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Social Contract

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | By EDWARD SCHWARTZ
A crucial element in President Clinton's overall plan for the economy is the development of a new social contract for the poor. Under the existing social contract, government hands out minimal amounts of money to low-income households for basic income, food, rent and health care and then keeps them under constant scrutiny to insure that they absolutely need it. No one likes this social contract - not the taxpayers who pay for it, not the welfare...
NEWS
June 29, 1992
In attempting to cut taxes and still balance the budget, the Republicans running the New Jersey legislature are playing havoc with the state's social safety net and devastating programs designed to move poor people from welfare into jobs. These Republican leaders apparently have concluded that most of the homeless, welfare recipients, wayward youth and working poor who will lose services are city dwellers and thus the Democrats' concern. But the situation is not that simple. Unless Republican-voting suburbanites in what remains the second-richest state continue to invest in education, training and other forms of well-targeted assistance for the state's poorer residents, social problems will continue to multiply and the state's economy will inevitably suffer.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2001 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In forgotten parts of the city, a handful of new companies are taking root. What once was an aluminum-gutter factory in North Philadelphia now houses a specialized mail center; an abandoned rail yard in West Philadelphia will soon spawn a fish farm. Elsewhere, tires are being recycled, eyeglass lenses are being made, and offices are being cleaned. In all, a half-dozen companies - with 130 employees - have cropped up in some unlikely places thanks to an unusual Philadelphia-based venture capital firm called Capital to People/Murex Investments Inc. The firm's goal: help build businesses that, in turn, guarantee employees health benefits, above-minimum-wage salaries, and equity in their companies.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
He's only the second of eight City Council sponsors on a bill that would require all city contractors or recipients of city funds to pay a "living wage," defined as $7.90 per hour. But make no mistake, for freshman Democrat Richard Mariano, this bill, vehemently opposed by the Rendell administration and much of the business community, is the political Holy Grail. On Council, Mariano, a former electrician and union official, is Mr. Labor - and after years of sitting on the back bench, Mariano took a front and center role on this bill.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | BY LINDA CHAVEZ
Love blooms on the job, the item in a glossy magazine announced to the world, with pictures of the saucy, middle-aged couple inset into the story. The only hint that this was no ordinary courtship between two interesting and powerful people came buried in the piece: "Both will have to leave long-term marriages," the reporter noted, almost as an afterthought. The story made no further mention of the other lives left like so much flotsam in the wake of this romance: an abandoned wife and husband, a child who will spend his adolescence shuttling between two households.
NEWS
June 6, 2005
CITY OUNCIL members Blondell Reynolds Brown and W. Wilson Goode Jr. had nothing better to do than to get an ordinance adopted requiring corporations doing business with the city to disclose whether or not they had historical ties to slavery? I'm sure there are more pressing things in this city that they could have been working on. Why dig up bones from hundreds of years ago? What will this accomplish? Nothing. Brown said, "The message sent is that companies are willing to abide by the terms of a social contract and to be collectively responsible for their behavior.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
By William G. Durden Ask national security officials where the greatest threat to the homeland lies, and they're sure to tell you it's in ungoverned territory - those areas around the world where the absence of law and order allows terrorists to operate without fear of reprisal. In colleges, too, ungoverned student behavior can disrupt order and threaten safety. A small subset of students who ignore the social contract and do what they want, when they want to, can have a disproportionate impact on a campus.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
By Lanny Morgnanesi Lately there's been much reading of old but relevant documents, like the Constitution. For my part, I've been reading old but relevant books. One is The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His 18th-century writings helped inspire the French Revolution and probably the American Revolution. In this small book he uses a familiar term later picked up in our Declaration of Independence: "unalienable rights. " Until recently, I thought unalienable rights were ones that could not be taken away.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
IN RESPONSE to Glenn Stankovics' letter regarding the usefulness of the local slavery-disclosure ordinance, he should know that I intend to make full use of Wachovia's admission of financial ties to slavery to further address racial discrimination in their current lending and investment activities. Heretofore, my community reinvestment legislation has been restricted to combatting bank redlining of low- and moderate-income communities in Philadelphia. The laws that I crafted have led to the commitment of more than 5,000 small-business loans and more than 10,000 home-mortgage and -improvement loans to those neighborhoods since 2003.
NEWS
April 6, 1993 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Drug dealing. Public drinking. Crime. Residents of Queen Village want it to stop. The problem is getting everyone in this racially and economically diverse neighborhood to agree on a plan. The neighborhood is bordered by 6th Street, Washington Avenue, and the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers. It includes the huge Southwark Plaza public housing development at 4th Street and Washington Avenue. For years, the major stumbling block to attacking the community's problems has been the delay in the Philadelphia Housing Authority's $48 million reconstruction of Southwark.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Joseph Roy and George White
America's public schools have played a role in reducing inequality and increasing the bonds between people of diverse backgrounds. Yet, as we struggle through a particularly partisan era, a period in which the middle class is shrinking and income inequality is increasing, there is a growing movement to privatize public schools. Earlier this month, the Philadelphia School District announced that even more of the city's public schools will be given to charter organizations this fall, even though only 29 percent of the 80 charter schools met benchmarks.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
By Stephen M. Curtis, Jerome S. Parker, Stephanie Shanblatt, and Karen A. Stout Federal economists estimate that two million jobs go unfilled today as a result of skills, training, and education gaps. In Pennsylvania, a report submitted last year by the governor's Manufacturing Advisory Council noted that the number of new workers entering the industry, coupled with the growth in manufacturing, has left a staggering gap of available skilled workers. Simply put: Every decent-paying job today takes more skill and more education, but too many Americans are not ready.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
Equal voices I want to thank The Inquirer for running the excerpts from Betrayal of the American Dream by Donald L. Bartlett and James B. Steele. This is a very astute and honest presentation of what has been happening to the middle class in America and its message needs to be read and understood by all. The series points out the legislative and judicial policies driving the middle class to extinction: Companies outsourcing jobs without penalties; public education funds being drained for the benefit of charter schools; allowing corporations to have the rights of individual citizens; blatant attempts to debilitate and drain the safety nets created to help Americans in times of crisis; and the lack of courage to fairly tax the governing elites.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
By William G. Durden Ask national security officials where the greatest threat to the homeland lies, and they're sure to tell you it's in ungoverned territory - those areas around the world where the absence of law and order allows terrorists to operate without fear of reprisal. In colleges, too, ungoverned student behavior can disrupt order and threaten safety. A small subset of students who ignore the social contract and do what they want, when they want to, can have a disproportionate impact on a campus.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
By Lanny Morgnanesi Lately there's been much reading of old but relevant documents, like the Constitution. For my part, I've been reading old but relevant books. One is The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His 18th-century writings helped inspire the French Revolution and probably the American Revolution. In this small book he uses a familiar term later picked up in our Declaration of Independence: "unalienable rights. " Until recently, I thought unalienable rights were ones that could not be taken away.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
We're in the midst of a great four-year national debate on the size and reach of government, the future of the welfare state, indeed, the nature of the social contract between citizen and state. The distinctive visions of the two parties - social-democratic vs. limited-government - have underlain every debate since Barack Obama's inauguration: the stimulus, health-care reform, financial regulation. The debt ceiling is but the latest. The sausage-making may be unsightly, but the problem is not that Washington is "broken" - that ridiculous, ubiquitous cliché.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | By Stephanie Coontz
For the first time in 150 years, households headed by single adults and unmarried couples now outnumber married-couple families. In 1960, married-couple households represented more than 78 percent of American households. As late as 2000, married couples were 52 percent of all households. But in 2005, according to the recently released American Community Survey, households with a married couple at their core made up less than 50 percent of all households. That's a psychologically significant number, of course.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
IN RESPONSE to Glenn Stankovics' letter regarding the usefulness of the local slavery-disclosure ordinance, he should know that I intend to make full use of Wachovia's admission of financial ties to slavery to further address racial discrimination in their current lending and investment activities. Heretofore, my community reinvestment legislation has been restricted to combatting bank redlining of low- and moderate-income communities in Philadelphia. The laws that I crafted have led to the commitment of more than 5,000 small-business loans and more than 10,000 home-mortgage and -improvement loans to those neighborhoods since 2003.
NEWS
June 6, 2005
CITY OUNCIL members Blondell Reynolds Brown and W. Wilson Goode Jr. had nothing better to do than to get an ordinance adopted requiring corporations doing business with the city to disclose whether or not they had historical ties to slavery? I'm sure there are more pressing things in this city that they could have been working on. Why dig up bones from hundreds of years ago? What will this accomplish? Nothing. Brown said, "The message sent is that companies are willing to abide by the terms of a social contract and to be collectively responsible for their behavior.
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