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NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Ian Deitch, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - An Israeli protester set himself alight during a rally Saturday night marking the anniversary of a wave of demonstrations that swept the country to protest the high cost of living and other social issues, authorities said. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the man in his 40s poured flammable liquid over himself at a protest in Tel Aviv and set himself on fire. He was later rushed to a hospital, where he was being treated for serious burns, Rosenfeld said. Israel's Channel 10 TV showed footage of the man on fire.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Declaring "the days of Rambo are over," a top general said Tuesday that cultural, social and behavioral concerns may be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military's special operations units. Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that having seen women working alongside commando teams in Afghanistan, he is less concerned about their physical strength than the social issues that could arise.
NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn and Kasie Hunt, Associated Press
RENO, Nev. - The presidential candidates tried to put aside politically risky talk of gay rights Friday and return to Americans' top worry, the economy, in two states critical to the hopes of President Obama and his rival Mitt Romney. Obama discussed how to help homeowners seeking to avoid foreclosure in hard-hit Nevada, while Romney was focusing on jobs in North Carolina - more evidence that each views the sluggish economic recovery as the key issue in November's election. For both, it was a day to move past the week's back-and-forth on gay marriage, punctuated by Obama's announcement that he now supports it. Romney, who reiterated his opposition to same-sex marriage repeatedly, was distracted by a news report that led him to apologize for decades ago mistreating a high school classmate who was gay. "There are things that we can do right now to help create jobs, to help restore some of the financial security that so many families have lost," Obama told Nevada voters after he met with struggling homeowners.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer
COULD FORMER U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum's chances to win his home state's presidential primary election be slipping away? Santorum holds a razor-thin 2-percentage-point lead over former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in Pennsylvania's April 24 Republican primary, according to a Daily News /Franklin & Marshall College Poll to be released Wednesday. Romney, who took 28 percent to Santorum's 30 percent, has room to grow since 24 percent of the 505 registered Republicans in the poll said that they are undecided.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
Most presidential candidates would have brushed aside the young woman's challenge, perhaps mumbling something polite about agreeing to disagree. Not Rick Santorum, on that January afternoon in a hotel ballroom full of college students in Concord, N.H. He was going to convince her (and the entire room) that, no, the inherent right to happiness does not mean society should permit two gay men to marry. "So if you're not happy unless you're married to five other people, is that OK?"
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
I recently bought Pat Meehan a beer in an Amtrak coach car on a late-night train from Washington to Philadelphia. Meehan, the former U.S. attorney, is locked in one of the hottest House races in the nation against State Rep. Brian Lentz in Pennsylvania's Seventh District. I have known Meehan for years, but we hadn't planned to take the same train. We shared an observation about this election cycle: the lack of conversation about social issues. Meehan told me that out on the stump, it is all about the economy.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From 1828 to 1888, Hiram Corson practiced medicine from an office in rural Montgomery County, making house calls as a matter of routine and delivering about 3,000 babies. But his impact was also felt nationally in the medical community. And along with his work as a doctor, he was a leading liberal advocate on the pressing social issues of his day. "Dr. Corson was a progressive in both medicine and on controversial social issues," said Louis A. Meier, a Norristown surgeon and student of local medical history.
NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BY NOW, we all know that Cecil the lion was slaughtered by a rich American dentist named Walter Palmer, who paid $50,000 to track and kill the magnificent beast in Zimbabwe in early July. I've never understood the allure of hunting animals for kicks, whether it's offing a squirrel with a .22 or ripping into a big cat like Cecil with a crossbow. A lot of Americans don't get it, either. Over 735,000 of them have signed a "Justice for Cecil" petition on change.org, urging punishment for those involved in Cecil's death (including the big-game tour guides Palmer hired to help hunt his prey)
NEWS
November 12, 2004
Now, having taken down my Kerry-Edwards lawn sign, I have concluded that the Democrats lost because they continue to move further and further to the left on social issues, exalting "anything goes" as equally beneficial for society and better public policy. Consider the overwhelming 11-for-11 passage of state constitutional amendments codifying marriage as an exclusively heterosexual institution and prohibiting any facsimile of such in most cases. America can see what Democrats are trying to do with their support for "civil unions" and activist judges.
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NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BY NOW, we all know that Cecil the lion was slaughtered by a rich American dentist named Walter Palmer, who paid $50,000 to track and kill the magnificent beast in Zimbabwe in early July. I've never understood the allure of hunting animals for kicks, whether it's offing a squirrel with a .22 or ripping into a big cat like Cecil with a crossbow. A lot of Americans don't get it, either. Over 735,000 of them have signed a "Justice for Cecil" petition on change.org, urging punishment for those involved in Cecil's death (including the big-game tour guides Palmer hired to help hunt his prey)
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may be surprised to learn the theme of Philadelphia's next TEDx conference could best be summarized by a pop song. But then you'd be underestimating the creativity of TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design), which draws inspiration from all quarters of culture. Called "And Justice for All," TEDx Philadelphia 2015 (that small x denotes a locally organized, as opposed to national, TED) will bring 14 speakers to the Temple Performing Arts Center for a daylong conference Thursday.
NEWS
April 9, 2015
I'M FEELING a little sorry for the Republican Party these days. For one thing, it can't really play in the mayor's race. And I mean no offense to Melissa Murray Bailey (the GOP candidate, in case you're wondering). For another thing, the party seems intent on reprising its off-message messes at the national and maybe even the state level. Doesn't it seem as if the national plan, as trotted out in Indiana, is stopping gays from getting married? Message: If only we could keep lesbians from buying bridal bouquets in Bloomington, the country could get back on track.
NEWS
April 8, 2015
For one thing, it can't really play in the mayor's race. And I mean no offense to Melissa Murray Bailey (the GOP candidate, in case you're wondering). For another thing, the party seems intent on reprising its off-message messes at the national and maybe even the state level. Doesn't it seem as if the national plan, as trotted out in Indiana, is stopping gays from getting married? Message: If only we could keep lesbians from buying bridal bouquets in Bloomington, the country could get back on track.
NEWS
February 5, 2015
LET'S TALK ABOUT two who'll never be president: Rick Santorum and Mike Huckabee. Both show up in a Quinnipiac poll released yesterday. Both trail Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania by 20 points. And that's because, if you listen to them lately, both still play to states that run north/south in the middle of the country. I know polling for a race a year away is mostly a test of name ID. I don't buy the inevitability of Hillary in 2016 just as I didn't in 2008. But two things I'm fairly certain of: Candidates with limited regional support can't win the White House; and candidates consistently selling intolerance and self-righteousness shouldn't win the White House.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Taliban sighting in Harrisburg? Regarding State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe's silencing of Rep. Brian Sims (D., Phila.) as Sims attempted to praise the recent Supreme Court decision overturning the Defense of Marriage Act, I didn't realize Butler County Republican Metcalfe was elected to the Pennsylvania legislature to promote God's law ("House members debate God's law," June 28). Aren't we fighting a war in Afghanistan against this kind of thing? Ron Ranieri, Dresher Greetings from Butler County As a native of Butler County, I would like to inform my fellow Philadelphians that not everyone from that county or from Western Pennsylvania condones the bigoted, uninformed, and mean-spirited positions taken by State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler)
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Declaring "the days of Rambo are over," a top general said Tuesday that cultural, social and behavioral concerns may be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military's special operations units. Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that having seen women working alongside commando teams in Afghanistan, he is less concerned about their physical strength than the social issues that could arise.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Facing lingering tensions in his party, the chairman of the Republican National Committee urged religious conservatives Saturday to support the GOP's plans to expand. "I would just ask you that we come together and that we pray for the future of this country," Reince Priebus said on the final day of the Faith and Freedom Coalition conference that brought several Republicans leaders together with evangelical activists. "I'm a Christian. I'm a believer. God lives in my heart.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian conservative and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who drew wide attention when he publicly accused the administration of failing to live up to the values it espoused, died Friday in Charlotte, N.C. He was diagnosed a decade ago with brain cancer, his wife, Kimberly, said. After leaving his post as deputy director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives in 2003, Mr. Kuo became an open critic of that operation.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
I'M A SUCKER for long-shot candidates running campaigns that seem to stem more from political fiction than any reality. As such, I cannot ignore one Max Myers, who is now officially running for governor. How much of a long shot is he? Well, the only reason he has a prayer is that he's an ordained minister. How unusual is his campaign? He's a Pentecostal minister from central Pennsylvania running as a Democrat. He's traveling the state on an announcement tour that started Monday in Philly at the William Way LGBT Community Center and ends Wednesday at an Allentown brewery.
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