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NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Ian Deitch, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - An Israeli protester set himself alight during a rally Saturday night marking the anniversary of a wave of demonstrations that swept the country to protest the high cost of living and other social issues, authorities said. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the man in his 40s poured flammable liquid over himself at a protest in Tel Aviv and set himself on fire. He was later rushed to a hospital, where he was being treated for serious burns, Rosenfeld said. Israel's Channel 10 TV showed footage of the man on fire.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Declaring "the days of Rambo are over," a top general said Tuesday that cultural, social and behavioral concerns may be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military's special operations units. Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that having seen women working alongside commando teams in Afghanistan, he is less concerned about their physical strength than the social issues that could arise.
NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn and Kasie Hunt, Associated Press
RENO, Nev. - The presidential candidates tried to put aside politically risky talk of gay rights Friday and return to Americans' top worry, the economy, in two states critical to the hopes of President Obama and his rival Mitt Romney. Obama discussed how to help homeowners seeking to avoid foreclosure in hard-hit Nevada, while Romney was focusing on jobs in North Carolina - more evidence that each views the sluggish economic recovery as the key issue in November's election. For both, it was a day to move past the week's back-and-forth on gay marriage, punctuated by Obama's announcement that he now supports it. Romney, who reiterated his opposition to same-sex marriage repeatedly, was distracted by a news report that led him to apologize for decades ago mistreating a high school classmate who was gay. "There are things that we can do right now to help create jobs, to help restore some of the financial security that so many families have lost," Obama told Nevada voters after he met with struggling homeowners.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer
COULD FORMER U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum's chances to win his home state's presidential primary election be slipping away? Santorum holds a razor-thin 2-percentage-point lead over former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in Pennsylvania's April 24 Republican primary, according to a Daily News /Franklin & Marshall College Poll to be released Wednesday. Romney, who took 28 percent to Santorum's 30 percent, has room to grow since 24 percent of the 505 registered Republicans in the poll said that they are undecided.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Most presidential candidates would have brushed aside the young woman's challenge, perhaps mumbling something polite about agreeing to disagree. Not Rick Santorum, on that January afternoon in a hotel ballroom full of college students in Concord, N.H. He was going to convince her (and the entire room) that, no, the inherent right to happiness does not mean society should permit two gay men to marry. "So if you're not happy unless you're married to five other people, is that OK?"
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
I recently bought Pat Meehan a beer in an Amtrak coach car on a late-night train from Washington to Philadelphia. Meehan, the former U.S. attorney, is locked in one of the hottest House races in the nation against State Rep. Brian Lentz in Pennsylvania's Seventh District. I have known Meehan for years, but we hadn't planned to take the same train. We shared an observation about this election cycle: the lack of conversation about social issues. Meehan told me that out on the stump, it is all about the economy.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From 1828 to 1888, Hiram Corson practiced medicine from an office in rural Montgomery County, making house calls as a matter of routine and delivering about 3,000 babies. But his impact was also felt nationally in the medical community. And along with his work as a doctor, he was a leading liberal advocate on the pressing social issues of his day. "Dr. Corson was a progressive in both medicine and on controversial social issues," said Louis A. Meier, a Norristown surgeon and student of local medical history.
NEWS
November 12, 2004
Now, having taken down my Kerry-Edwards lawn sign, I have concluded that the Democrats lost because they continue to move further and further to the left on social issues, exalting "anything goes" as equally beneficial for society and better public policy. Consider the overwhelming 11-for-11 passage of state constitutional amendments codifying marriage as an exclusively heterosexual institution and prohibiting any facsimile of such in most cases. America can see what Democrats are trying to do with their support for "civil unions" and activist judges.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Robert W. Patterson
For 20 years, Republican strategists have advised presidential candidates to steer clear of "controversial" social issues. Favoring a disciplined focus on "pocketbook" priorities to reach upscale suburban voters, that conventional wisdom not only sounds appealing when the economy struggles, but also comes naturally to Mitt Romney, who personifies the party's alleged advantage on economic and fiscal matters. Indeed, Romney is under pressure to name a running mate who reinforces his reputation for businesslike competence.
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NEWS
July 8, 2013
Taliban sighting in Harrisburg? Regarding State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe's silencing of Rep. Brian Sims (D., Phila.) as Sims attempted to praise the recent Supreme Court decision overturning the Defense of Marriage Act, I didn't realize Butler County Republican Metcalfe was elected to the Pennsylvania legislature to promote God's law ("House members debate God's law," June 28). Aren't we fighting a war in Afghanistan against this kind of thing? Ron Ranieri, Dresher Greetings from Butler County As a native of Butler County, I would like to inform my fellow Philadelphians that not everyone from that county or from Western Pennsylvania condones the bigoted, uninformed, and mean-spirited positions taken by State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler)
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Declaring "the days of Rambo are over," a top general said Tuesday that cultural, social and behavioral concerns may be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military's special operations units. Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that having seen women working alongside commando teams in Afghanistan, he is less concerned about their physical strength than the social issues that could arise.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Facing lingering tensions in his party, the chairman of the Republican National Committee urged religious conservatives Saturday to support the GOP's plans to expand. "I would just ask you that we come together and that we pray for the future of this country," Reince Priebus said on the final day of the Faith and Freedom Coalition conference that brought several Republicans leaders together with evangelical activists. "I'm a Christian. I'm a believer. God lives in my heart.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian conservative and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who drew wide attention when he publicly accused the administration of failing to live up to the values it espoused, died Friday in Charlotte, N.C. He was diagnosed a decade ago with brain cancer, his wife, Kimberly, said. After leaving his post as deputy director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives in 2003, Mr. Kuo became an open critic of that operation.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
I'M A SUCKER for long-shot candidates running campaigns that seem to stem more from political fiction than any reality. As such, I cannot ignore one Max Myers, who is now officially running for governor. How much of a long shot is he? Well, the only reason he has a prayer is that he's an ordained minister. How unusual is his campaign? He's a Pentecostal minister from central Pennsylvania running as a Democrat. He's traveling the state on an announcement tour that started Monday in Philly at the William Way LGBT Community Center and ends Wednesday at an Allentown brewery.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - New Pennsylvania laws that take effect in the coming days toughen penalties for underage drinking, mandate training for school workers on how to recognize and report child abuse, and require more humane methods of putting down animals. Others increase worker and employee contributions to the state's Unemployment Compensation Trust Fund; require contractors on public-works projects to make sure through the federal E-Verify system that their employees are legal residents; and simplify voting rules for servicemen and women and others living overseas.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
RICHARD Mourdock, a conservative Republican who is favored to win a U.S. Senate seat in Indiana, pulled a Todd Akin on Monday night, pontificating that pregnancies from rape or incest are "something God intended" - and therefore the victims should not be able to obtain abortions. But this time, the reaction of the Republican Party establishment was quite different from the reaction to Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin's assertion in August that, if a rape is "legitimate" (that is, the woman didn't secretly want it)
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | Robert W. Patterson
Robert W. Patterson is editor of the public-policy journal the Family in America When Sen. John Kerry sought to unseat President George W. Bush eight years ago, journalist Thomas Frank thought he could help the challenger from Massachusetts. In a 2004 bestseller, What's the Matter With Kansas? , Frank claimed Republicans were playing dirty tricks by leveraging cultural "wedge" issues to dupe voters in his native state from voting their economic interests - in other words, for Democrats.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
By Arthur Caplan When I was a kid growing up in the suburbs of Boston in the late 1960s, I had little firsthand contact with minorities. But I knew a lot about one African American man who kept showing up on our new color television and in the sports pages that I devoured every day: Muhammad Ali. Due to chronic illness, Ali can't speak as eloquently as he once did. But that doesn't mean he hasn't been heard. During my youth, there was no more prominent athlete than Ali. His every deed and word - and there were plenty of them - was news.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
TAMPA - Rick Santorum stared at his smartphone, monitoring his wife, Karen, who was 10 yards away at the anchor desk in the CNN Grill, appearing as part of an on-air panel during Tuesday's session of the Republican National Convention. He was getting ready, as he might say, to take it to 'em. Two of his daughters and a couple of aides hunched over him at his table, blocking the noise of all the people who wanted to get at him. Afterward, Santorum was mobbed by well-wishers and fans, wanting to know about his coming speech in the convention hall; his disabled daughter, Bella; and his take on the man who Tuesday claimed the prize Santorum had wanted.
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