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NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Mitt Romney has lost his central asset. It is no longer obvious that he is the Republican with the best chance of defeating President Obama. Romney was never fully trusted or liked by the staunchest conservatives. But until now, enough of them have been willing to swallow their doubts at critical moments because they believed the former Massachusetts governor could win the election. This is not true anymore. Reflecting the damage Romney's image has suffered in the six weeks since voting started in Iowa, he is running little better than Rick Santorum, now his main opponent, in matchups with the president.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian conservative and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who drew wide attention when he publicly accused the administration of failing to live up to the values it espoused, died Friday in Charlotte, N.C. He was diagnosed a decade ago with brain cancer, his wife, Kimberly, said. After leaving his post as deputy director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives in 2003, Mr. Kuo became an open critic of that operation.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Most candidates who emerge from the relative shadows to take the lead in a presidential campaign start to throttle back on the rhetorical thunderbolts and settle into a groove with a winning script full of phrases predigested by pollsters and focus groups. Not Rick Santorum, apparently. In recent days, the former Pennsylvania senator has accused President Obama of a "phony theology," suggested that a new federal requirement that insurance companies cover some prenatal testing would increase abortions, and compared Americans' patience with Obama - in the face of what Santorum calls the administration's threat to freedom - to America's initial indifference to Hitler's rise.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
By Arthur Caplan When I was a kid growing up in the suburbs of Boston in the late 1960s, I had little firsthand contact with minorities. But I knew a lot about one African American man who kept showing up on our new color television and in the sports pages that I devoured every day: Muhammad Ali. Due to chronic illness, Ali can't speak as eloquently as he once did. But that doesn't mean he hasn't been heard. During my youth, there was no more prominent athlete than Ali. His every deed and word - and there were plenty of them - was news.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | by Christine James-Brown
Last week marked introduction of an important advancement in measuring the impact and effectiveness of services to the community. Established by the United Way of America, a training organization for 1,400 independent United Ways nationwide, it is called the United Way State of Caring Index. As a measure of a compassionate America in the 21st century, this was created as a new approach to check the health and well-being of our nation. It tracks multi-year trends, from 1988 to 1998, and provides critical information on pressing social issues.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | Cynthia Burton
In the Republican primary for U.S. Senate, polls show voters don't know the candidates' names, let alone their positions on issues or qualifications for office. None of the party's better-known politicians even tried for a chance to take on Democratic U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, perhaps remembering that Casey ousted Republican former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum by 17 points in 2006. In the Republican primary field of five, the two most credible candidates are largely self-funded millionaires: Steve Welch and Tom Smith.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though David Adamany would ultimately make his name as a highly touted university president, his career as an academic started almost on a whim. A Harvard Law School graduate, Adamany returned to Wisconsin in the 1960s to work in the state Attorney General's Office. Because of his interest in social issues, he took a few night courses in political science at the University of Wisconsin, just for fun. But the university, in an enrollment boom, hired Adamany as a teaching assistant.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | Freelance
A LOT OF PEOPLE were smiling Tuesday afternoon. People who excel at irony and sarcasm, especially when writing about a certain breed of conservative. People who think that talking about "good" and "evil" as if they were quantitative, tangible things is a sign of mental illness. People who pretend to tolerate differences, but only when those differences don't offend their own personal sense of fairness. When Rick Santorum announced that he was abandoning his campaign at the most sacred site in Pennsylvania, you had the sense that there was joy in newsrooms and campaign headquarters and colleges across the Keystone State.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | Annette John-Hall
I probably wasn't the only one who braced for a backlash after the NAACP followed President Obama's lead and came out with a resolution supporting same-sex marriage. How could I not? As a black Christian, I've seen the eye-rolling disapproval among plenty of fellow believers. I've heard the self-righteous vestibule chatter, felt the thick tension in the sanctuary when pastors mention homosexuality from the pulpit — if they dare. I'm not saying African Americans have cornered the market on the gay-marriage debate.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
RICHARD Mourdock, a conservative Republican who is favored to win a U.S. Senate seat in Indiana, pulled a Todd Akin on Monday night, pontificating that pregnancies from rape or incest are "something God intended" - and therefore the victims should not be able to obtain abortions. But this time, the reaction of the Republican Party establishment was quite different from the reaction to Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin's assertion in August that, if a rape is "legitimate" (that is, the woman didn't secretly want it)
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