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Social Issues

NEWS
May 14, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
Focusing on wrong issues First, let me say that I couldn't care less whom a person marries. On the list of issues in this country, gay marriage is probably about No. 12,454. Yet it has been on the front page of every newspaper and the lead story on all TV news shows for the last week ("Obama backs same-sex marriage," Thursday). I can understand President Obama wanting it that way, given the $15 trillion debt, the $1.5 trillion annual deficit, the high unemployment rate, a failed strategy in the Middle East, and 50 percent of the population paying no federal income tax in an ever-expanding entitlement society.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
I'M A SUCKER for long-shot candidates running campaigns that seem to stem more from political fiction than any reality. As such, I cannot ignore one Max Myers, who is now officially running for governor. How much of a long shot is he? Well, the only reason he has a prayer is that he's an ordained minister. How unusual is his campaign? He's a Pentecostal minister from central Pennsylvania running as a Democrat. He's traveling the state on an announcement tour that started Monday in Philly at the William Way LGBT Community Center and ends Wednesday at an Allentown brewery.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
Mitt Romney's small-town bus tour of swing states rolled across Pennsylvania Saturday, allowing the Republican presidential candidate to campaign as the champion of the middle class in picturesque, everyday American settings. Romney dodged a group of about 250 Democratic protesters, led by former Gov. Ed Rendell, by diverting from a scheduled stop at a Quakertown Wawato another Wawa three miles. The abrupt schedule change gave a taste of the fight ahead in what is likely to be a close presidential campaign, where every move is contested by one side or the other.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By James O'Toole, PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE
DETROIT - On a day when General Motors trumpeted record profits, Rick Santorum said that the auto industry would have done as well or better if the federal government, under the last two administrations, had not intervened to save the industry. Declaring himself an enemy of all federal bailouts, the former senator noted that Mitt Romney, his leading opponent in this state's crucial primary, had supported the Bush administration's TARP lifeline to Wall Street but had opposed the federal investment in GM and Chrysler.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
By Arthur Caplan When I was a kid growing up in the suburbs of Boston in the late 1960s, I had little firsthand contact with minorities. But I knew a lot about one African American man who kept showing up on our new color television and in the sports pages that I devoured every day: Muhammad Ali. Due to chronic illness, Ali can't speak as eloquently as he once did. But that doesn't mean he hasn't been heard. During my youth, there was no more prominent athlete than Ali. His every deed and word - and there were plenty of them - was news.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's where government changes the lives of the most vulnerable: the poor, the young, the sick. And here's where voters can see whether the politicians have anything to say - or are just saying anything. In the third of a series on the issues, we look at where the two major candidates for governor, Republican Tom Ridge and Democrat Mark Singel, stand on social questions, and we present the story of one woman on welfare. WELFARE REFORM RIDGE APPROACH: PEOPLE MUST BE PUSHED.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An old-time studio mogul once notoriously dismissed movies that aspired to social conscience with the advice: "If you want to send a message, call Western Union. " In the 1950s and 1960s, you would have been better advised to call Stanley Kramer, especially if you wanted your message shaped in an accessible way that reached masses of filmgoers. Mr. Kramer, 87, who died of pneumonia on Monday in Woodland Hills, Calif., was a prolific and influential producer-director in postwar Hollywood.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Sana Musasama's ceramic sculpture solo at Swarthmore College's List Gallery is the kind of exhibit that aims to put the old-style art aficionado out for the count. Her show is a reminder that in recent decades much attention has been devoted to the art of display in museums and galleries, and many artists have responded by coming up with an art of pure display and nothing else. But there are other artists who demonstrate that our era is better than that. One of these is New Yorker Musasama, among the most prominent American women ceramic sculptors and a teacher at Hunter College.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | BY CAL THOMAS
The social issues that dominated the elections of 1980, '82 and '84 seemed nearly absent from the recently concluded campaign. Hardly anyone talked about abortion, busing or school prayer this time around, and few, if any, TV analysts mentioned them as having played a prominent part in the voters' consideration of candidates. Shortly after President Reagan was inaugurated in 1981, House Minority Leader Robert Michel said that Congress ultimately must come to grips with the social issues, as distasteful as they might be to many members, because "they deal with basic values and therefore have the ability to inflame passions on all sides.
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