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NEWS
October 12, 1987 | By Neal Peirce
Maybe America's New Right and its Religious Right aren't headed straight for the divorce court. But the duo that was so instrumental in the Reagan political revolution is under heavy strain. And the problems go a lot deeper than differences over evangelist Pat Robertson's presidential candidacy. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the country's leading conservative think tank for state legislators, has jettisoned such social issues as abortion, school prayer, creationist textbooks and permitting corporal punishment in the schools.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
TAMPA - Rick Santorum stared at his smartphone, monitoring his wife, Karen, who was 10 yards away at the anchor desk in the CNN Grill, appearing as part of an on-air panel during Tuesday's session of the Republican National Convention. He was getting ready, as he might say, to take it to 'em. Two of his daughters and a couple of aides hunched over him at his table, blocking the noise of all the people who wanted to get at him. Afterward, Santorum was mobbed by well-wishers and fans, wanting to know about his coming speech in the convention hall; his disabled daughter, Bella; and his take on the man who Tuesday claimed the prize Santorum had wanted.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | BY MOLLY IVINS
In the face of increasingly bad economic news, Bush and the Republicans have increasingly pitched the re-election campaign on 'family values,' a nebulous phrase that the GOP hopes connotes a social permissiveness on the part of Democrats, especially the party's support for homosexual rights. - news story in the Houston Chronicle, July 29. The Chronicle's analysis is conventional wisdom already. The Republicans are going to run against gays. Last time out, they used Willie Horton and our fear of black criminals to take our minds off the Iran/Contra scandal, the S&L crisis, the faltering economy and the whole greedfest of the '80s.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leslie Florio, 27, a free-lance newspaper reporter who was remembered for bringing a special passion and sensitivity to stories about social justice, died Saturday at Riddle Memorial Hospital after a short illness. A resident of Media for several months, she had previously lived in Germantown and West Philadelphia. During several years as a journalist in the Philadelphia area, Ms. Florio wrote more than 120 bylined stories for the Inquirer's Delaware County Neighbors section, covering everything from high school sports and local government to peace marches and political refugees.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio, the bishop-elect for the Diocese of Camden, only needs to look out the window of his fifth-floor office at Sixth and Market Streets to see there is plenty of work the church can do. "I think housing is a major issue. It's so obvious people need a place to live. " He noted that in Newark, where he was an auxiliary bishop, "I was founder of what was called the Domus Corporation. It's a Latin name that means housing. It was aimed at low-income and special-needs housing for people . . . As I am leaving, we have about 300 units we have developed over the last three years.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following is a quiz. It centers on nature's most mystical relationship, on a concept America has adopted as her own along with apple pie, on something that most people take for granted - motherhood. In Long Beach, Calif., in 1983, a woman was artificially inseminated with the sperm of a man whose wife could not produce eggs of her own. Five days later, the tiny embryo - or more accurately, pre-embryo, or conceptus - was washed out of the woman's body and implanted in the womb of the man's wife.
LIVING
April 10, 1994 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you're looking for excuses to hate Rod and Bob Jackson-Paris, you don't have to look far. You could dislike them for political or moral reasons. The Jackson-Paris guys are gay. They're gay and they're married. They're gay, married and making a pretty good living publicizing it. As if that weren't enough, they're gorgeous. Bob and Rod are buff. They're hunks. Bob, formerly Bob Paris, is a former Mr. Universe. He has curly brown hair and a voice as gravelly as a country road.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Supreme Court is one of the most closely watched and well-regarded state courts in the nation, with a reputation for scholarly legal analysis and political independence. And as yesterday's decision opening the door to same-sex marriage showed, it certainly doesn't shy away from the difficult issues of the day. "There's just a long list of cases in which the New Jersey Supreme Court has been in the forefront, and often other states have fallen into place after the New Jersey Supreme Court paves the way," said Sally F. Goldfarb, a law professor at Rutgers School of Law in Camden.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - New Pennsylvania laws that take effect in the coming days toughen penalties for underage drinking, mandate training for school workers on how to recognize and report child abuse, and require more humane methods of putting down animals. Others increase worker and employee contributions to the state's Unemployment Compensation Trust Fund; require contractors on public-works projects to make sure through the federal E-Verify system that their employees are legal residents; and simplify voting rules for servicemen and women and others living overseas.
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