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Social Issues

NEWS
October 26, 1994 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's where government changes the lives of the most vulnerable: the poor, the young, the sick. And here's where voters can see whether the politicians have anything to say - or are just saying anything. In the third of a series on the issues, we look at where the two major candidates for governor, Republican Tom Ridge and Democrat Mark Singel, stand on social questions, and we present the story of one woman on welfare. WELFARE REFORM RIDGE APPROACH: PEOPLE MUST BE PUSHED.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An old-time studio mogul once notoriously dismissed movies that aspired to social conscience with the advice: "If you want to send a message, call Western Union. " In the 1950s and 1960s, you would have been better advised to call Stanley Kramer, especially if you wanted your message shaped in an accessible way that reached masses of filmgoers. Mr. Kramer, 87, who died of pneumonia on Monday in Woodland Hills, Calif., was a prolific and influential producer-director in postwar Hollywood.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Sana Musasama's ceramic sculpture solo at Swarthmore College's List Gallery is the kind of exhibit that aims to put the old-style art aficionado out for the count. Her show is a reminder that in recent decades much attention has been devoted to the art of display in museums and galleries, and many artists have responded by coming up with an art of pure display and nothing else. But there are other artists who demonstrate that our era is better than that. One of these is New Yorker Musasama, among the most prominent American women ceramic sculptors and a teacher at Hunter College.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | BY CAL THOMAS
The social issues that dominated the elections of 1980, '82 and '84 seemed nearly absent from the recently concluded campaign. Hardly anyone talked about abortion, busing or school prayer this time around, and few, if any, TV analysts mentioned them as having played a prominent part in the voters' consideration of candidates. Shortly after President Reagan was inaugurated in 1981, House Minority Leader Robert Michel said that Congress ultimately must come to grips with the social issues, as distasteful as they might be to many members, because "they deal with basic values and therefore have the ability to inflame passions on all sides.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | By Neal Peirce
Maybe America's New Right and its Religious Right aren't headed straight for the divorce court. But the duo that was so instrumental in the Reagan political revolution is under heavy strain. And the problems go a lot deeper than differences over evangelist Pat Robertson's presidential candidacy. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the country's leading conservative think tank for state legislators, has jettisoned such social issues as abortion, school prayer, creationist textbooks and permitting corporal punishment in the schools.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
TAMPA - Rick Santorum stared at his smartphone, monitoring his wife, Karen, who was 10 yards away at the anchor desk in the CNN Grill, appearing as part of an on-air panel during Tuesday's session of the Republican National Convention. He was getting ready, as he might say, to take it to 'em. Two of his daughters and a couple of aides hunched over him at his table, blocking the noise of all the people who wanted to get at him. Afterward, Santorum was mobbed by well-wishers and fans, wanting to know about his coming speech in the convention hall; his disabled daughter, Bella; and his take on the man who Tuesday claimed the prize Santorum had wanted.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | BY MOLLY IVINS
In the face of increasingly bad economic news, Bush and the Republicans have increasingly pitched the re-election campaign on 'family values,' a nebulous phrase that the GOP hopes connotes a social permissiveness on the part of Democrats, especially the party's support for homosexual rights. - news story in the Houston Chronicle, July 29. The Chronicle's analysis is conventional wisdom already. The Republicans are going to run against gays. Last time out, they used Willie Horton and our fear of black criminals to take our minds off the Iran/Contra scandal, the S&L crisis, the faltering economy and the whole greedfest of the '80s.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leslie Florio, 27, a free-lance newspaper reporter who was remembered for bringing a special passion and sensitivity to stories about social justice, died Saturday at Riddle Memorial Hospital after a short illness. A resident of Media for several months, she had previously lived in Germantown and West Philadelphia. During several years as a journalist in the Philadelphia area, Ms. Florio wrote more than 120 bylined stories for the Inquirer's Delaware County Neighbors section, covering everything from high school sports and local government to peace marches and political refugees.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio, the bishop-elect for the Diocese of Camden, only needs to look out the window of his fifth-floor office at Sixth and Market Streets to see there is plenty of work the church can do. "I think housing is a major issue. It's so obvious people need a place to live. " He noted that in Newark, where he was an auxiliary bishop, "I was founder of what was called the Domus Corporation. It's a Latin name that means housing. It was aimed at low-income and special-needs housing for people . . . As I am leaving, we have about 300 units we have developed over the last three years.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following is a quiz. It centers on nature's most mystical relationship, on a concept America has adopted as her own along with apple pie, on something that most people take for granted - motherhood. In Long Beach, Calif., in 1983, a woman was artificially inseminated with the sperm of a man whose wife could not produce eggs of her own. Five days later, the tiny embryo - or more accurately, pre-embryo, or conceptus - was washed out of the woman's body and implanted in the womb of the man's wife.
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