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Social Issues

NEWS
February 7, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
GRAND JUNCTION, COLO. - Sensing a possible threat, Mitt Romney criticized Rick Santorum's time in the Senate as "not effective" because of his past support for pork-barrel spending as he worked to fend off an unexpected challenge in the next states to vote. Santorum countered that Romney, the front-runner in the GOP presidential race, "should not be our nominee" because he was "dead wrong on the most important issue of the day" when, as governor, he signed a health-care overhaul in Massachusetts.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
AIKEN, S.C. - Rick Santorum yesterday branded Mitt Romney a liberal, said Newt Gingrich's policy positions have been "all over the place" and laughed that Ron Paul has been running for president "since 1938," looking to capture the GOP presidential nomination even if it takes harsh words for fellow Republicans. Santorum, a longtime footnote in the GOP contest now attracting scrutiny, tried to punch his way to the top of the pack with scathing critiques of his rivals ahead of Saturday's South Carolina primary.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
I recently bought Pat Meehan a beer in an Amtrak coach car on a late-night train from Washington to Philadelphia. Meehan, the former U.S. attorney, is locked in one of the hottest House races in the nation against State Rep. Brian Lentz in Pennsylvania's Seventh District. I have known Meehan for years, but we hadn't planned to take the same train. We shared an observation about this election cycle: the lack of conversation about social issues. Meehan told me that out on the stump, it is all about the economy.
NEWS
March 13, 2008 | By Rick Santorum
I attended the Council for National Policy meeting last week in New Orleans and listened to John McCain address the who's who of Hillary Rodham Clinton's vast right-wing conspiracy. It was another chance for McCain to, in his words, "not just unite, but reignite the base. " How did the crowd think he did? Let's just say it's hard to ignite anything with cold water and no fire. He talked about two legs of the Republican stool - spending/taxes and national security. But the third leg - social issues - went unmentioned.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Supreme Court is one of the most closely watched and well-regarded state courts in the nation, with a reputation for scholarly legal analysis and political independence. And as yesterday's decision opening the door to same-sex marriage showed, it certainly doesn't shy away from the difficult issues of the day. "There's just a long list of cases in which the New Jersey Supreme Court has been in the forefront, and often other states have fallen into place after the New Jersey Supreme Court paves the way," said Sally F. Goldfarb, a law professor at Rutgers School of Law in Camden.
NEWS
September 29, 2006 | By Marlene Nadle
President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's easy slide to victory in the Brazilian election this Sunday may be prevented by the disillusioned people in the social movements who originally put him in power. "We may vote for Sen. Heloisa Helena in the first round of the election," said Marcus Arruda from the Institute for Policy Alternatives. That could prevent Lula from getting more than 50 percent of the vote and force him into a runoff on Oct. 29. Heloisa Helena Lima de Moraes is a former member of Lula's Workers' Party.
NEWS
September 19, 2006 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Bucks County audience was partisan, sporting "I Like Mike" and "Murphy '06" campaign badges. And vocal, with boos and cheers prompting the moderator to remind the crowd, "This is not a pep rally. " The spectators' questions yesterday steered the first public debate between the two candidates for Congress away from the official but broad subject of health care to the more divisive issues of embryonic stem-cell research and abortion. Incumbent U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.)
NEWS
November 25, 2005 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
China's environmental problems are so widespread that they have begun to generate social instability. Choking on vile air, sickened by toxic water, citizens in some corners of this vast nation are rising up to protest the high environmental cost of China's economic boom. In one recent incident, villagers in this hilly coastal region grew so exasperated by contamination from nearby chemical plants that they overturned and smashed dozens of vehicles and beat up police officers who arrived to quell what was essentially an environmental riot.
NEWS
September 21, 2005 | By Terri Akman
When I first listened to the playback message on my answering machine and heard that it was Charles Ronkin, principal of Voorhees Middle School, I couldn't imagine what my son might have done wrong already. He had only been to the school for a 2 1/2-hour orientation, hardly enough time to get into real trouble. So, as I listened further to his message, my dread turned to relief, and then amazement, to discover that the principal was merely calling to find out how orientation had gone.
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