CollectionsSocial Justice
IN THE NEWS

Social Justice

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a boom box hanging from one shoulder, an old mailbag with his possessions slung over the other shoulder and a walking stick in hand, Junebug Jabbo Jones strolls onto the stage at the Painted Bride Art Center. The bearded, middle-age black man is dressed in denim overalls topped by a sport coat. A red bandanna is tied around his throat, and a brand new trilby hat sits jauntily on his head. He looks like an odd mixture of working man, tramp and sport. Junebug is the creation of actor John O'Neal, the star and only performer in Don't Start Me to Talkin' or I'll Tell You Everything I Know: Sayings From the Life and Writings of Junebug Jabbo Jones.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | By Suzanne Gordon and Isabel Marcus
The vice-presidential candidacy of Sen. Joe Lieberman, an Orthodox Jew, should evoke alarm, not celebration, in the American Jewish community. As admirable as his religious views may be to many fellow believers, Jewish and Gentile alike, what really defines Lieberman is his repudiation of the Jewish tradition of secular humanism and support for social and economic justice. Since arriving in the United States in large numbers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the vast majority of Jews have been secular humanists who have championed public education and social insurance programs for the sick, poor, disabled and elderly.
NEWS
September 29, 2006 | By Marlene Nadle
President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's easy slide to victory in the Brazilian election this Sunday may be prevented by the disillusioned people in the social movements who originally put him in power. "We may vote for Sen. Heloisa Helena in the first round of the election," said Marcus Arruda from the Institute for Policy Alternatives. That could prevent Lula from getting more than 50 percent of the vote and force him into a runoff on Oct. 29. Heloisa Helena Lima de Moraes is a former member of Lula's Workers' Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010
African American Women and Religion By Bettye Collier-Thomas Alfred A. Knopf. 695 pp. $37.50 Reviewed by Marla Frederick Bettye Collier-Thomas' Jesus, Jobs and Justice is a tour de force for the study of women and religion. It navigates within and beyond the walls of institutional religion to delineate the tremendous contributions of African American women of faith to the larger American project. Collier-Thomas, professor of history at Temple University, makes the convincing argument that it was, indeed, the amazing networks of organizations that women developed in the 1920s and '30s that laid the foundation for the success of the civil rights movement.
NEWS
July 29, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Coates Walker, 83, of Cheyney, an advocate for peace and social justice, died of complications of diabetes July 11 at Barclay Friends Nursing Home in West Chester. In 1991, after more than 50 years as a peace activist, Mr. Walker traveled to India to receive the Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation Award, which recognizes those who promote the nonviolent ideals of Mahatma Gandhi. During World War II, Mr. Walker, a Quaker and conscientious objector, went to jail rather than fight.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caroline "Cary" Isard, 91, of Drexel Hill, an advocate for social justice, died of pneumonia at Delaware County Memorial Hospital on Wednesday, Dec. 1. Her husband of 68 years, Walter Isard, died Nov. 6. In 1956, Mrs. Isard and her husband, an economist who had just joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, moved to Drexel Hill. The corner property with seven bedrooms had plenty of room for their large family and a history appropriate for the new owners, who were Quaker civil rights activists.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - While the Vatican has picked the highly disciplined Jesuits as advance men for planning papal pilgrimages and to run its worldwide broadcasting network, the notion of a Jesuit pope is still being absorbed in the Holy See. Before Pope Francis, no one from the nearly 500-year-old missionary order had been pope. Previous popes have punished Jesuit theologians for being too progressive in preaching and teaching. The last pontiff, Benedict XVI, sent a polite but firm letter inviting the order's worldwide members to pledge "total adhesion" to Catholic doctrine, including on divorce, homosexuality, and liberation theology.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Tamaccio, 62, a man of conviction who loved this country and Philadelphia yet chose a prison term instead of fighting in Vietnam, died Dec. 21 of lymphoma at Vancouver General Hospital in British Columbia. Mr. Tamaccio moved to Vancouver Island in 2005 after decades as an activist in Philadelphia-area political, environmental and social justice causes, such as opposing nuclear energy and overdevelopment, and advocating clean water and urban housing. A longtime resident of West Mount Airy, Mr. Tamaccio was a sought-after political consultant who got out the vote through door-to-door canvassing of thousands of households, and was a leader for decades in citizen-action groups seeking to change government policies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
It was an unfortunate incident, but one that propelled artist Michelle Ortiz into a career as a muralist dedicated to social change: Ortiz was a teenager, one of the few Latinas in her private high school. Fresh from art class, she went to the school store to look for a gift for her sister. The teacher in charge told her to stop handling the goods. "She told me, 'Don't touch that because your hands are dirty,' " Ortiz recalled of the conversation in 1996. Ortiz looked at her hands, puzzled.
NEWS
May 23, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James T. Ryan, of Lansdowne, 71, a labor educator and social justice activist, died of cancer Tuesday at home. For 26 years, Dr. Ryan was director of the Training and Upgrading Fund of District 1, Local 199C of the National Union of Hospital and Healthcare Employees, AFL-CIO. The fund was created in 1974 in a collective-bargaining agreement between the union and nine Philadelphia hospitals. Its purpose is to provide educational benefits to assist union members and the community to upgrade job skills and to keep pace with increasing technological demands.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leaders of the National Urban League announced a $1 million grant to the organization's Philadelphia chapter and voiced concern Friday about fatal shootings by police in Ferguson, Mo., and New York City that have sparked protests over the last two weeks. With Mayor Nutter and U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) standing by, Marc H. Morial, president of the league, announced that the chapter would receive the five-year commitment to boost its programs for job-seekers, entrepreneurs, and youth development.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her father's polygraph machine drew her eye each time she passed her parents' bedroom, a sleek silver briefcase she knew could read her thoughts. "He would always say to us, 'I hope you're telling me the truth,' " Kristen Ruell said. " 'Because you know I can check.' " It was a playful threat. But it seems to have served its purpose. Ruell, a 39-year-old from Philadelphia, became a national voice in the call for accountability at the Department of Veterans Affairs last week when she spoke before Congress about mismanagement at the Germantown VA center where she works.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Debora Kodish arrived in Philadelphia in the early 1980s with her new doctorate in folklore from the University of Texas, there was no one in the city documenting everyday life in its many and varied neighborhoods. No one organization was looking at what the African drummers were doing, what the Hispanic street artists were up to, what the Vietnamese musicians were playing, what the Italians in South Philly were saying - or at why they were doing what they were doing and saying what they were saying.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE REV. Larry G. Patrick II of Redeem Baptist Church in Strawberry Mansion is equally at home at Wednesday night Bible class and at a protest by Philadelphia fast-food workers demanding a $15-an-hour livable wage. Indeed, Patrick feels his calling as a minister also compels him to fight poverty and gun violence in one of the city's roughest neighborhoods. "There's no way, as a minister, that I cannot stand up and say anything about that," said Patrick, referring to low-wage workers who need food stamps just to put food on their own table.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's so good listening to old records," Allen Toussaint sings on his new album. And it's so good to hear old masters Toussaint and Ry Cooder in such fine form on their new records. Their live sets are among a spate of our favorite new roots-related releases. Songbook ( Rounder **** ) captures just Touissant and his piano at New York's Joe's Pub in 2009. The 75-year-old giant of New Orleans music is known more as a composer and arranger than as a performer, but like the great soul songwriter Dan Penn, he's as good an interpreter of his own material as anyone.
SPORTS
September 11, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
BILLIE JEAN KING thumped Bobby Riggs 40 years ago. Pounded him, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. Some people might have said she beat him like a redheaded stepchild. Not around Billie Jean, because the phrase reeks sourly of child abuse and prejudice, and Billie Jean was wary of words that hurt, even back then. Beat him like a rented mule wouldn't have been acceptable either, a phrase tainted by animal cruelty, with harsh notes of slavery and sharecropping. But she did beat Riggs handily and the women's movement had a new heroine, a talented, determined athlete with a social conscience.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
JERSEY CITY, N.J. - Deploring high costs and destroyed human potential in America's prisons, Newark Mayor Cory Booker on Wednesday called for sweeping changes in Congress of the criminal justice system. Mass incarceration "transforms" human potential "into an expense we all must pay," Booker told a small crowd of parishioners and reporters at the Metropolitan A.M.E. Zion Church. Booker, the Democratic nominee in New Jersey's special U.S. Senate race, called for the elimination of mandatory minimum sentencing for low-level, nonviolent drug offenders.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS A TEMPLE University professor, Ben Kohl had this quaint idea that his students should think. Not just about whom to text next, or whether to attend a weekend party, but about society. About social problems and social justice. In other words, how to fix what's wrong with the world. " 'Learn, read, think' were his watch words," said his wife, Linda Farthing-Kohl. "He was always looking for ways to engage his students, to get them to think about the world. " Benjamin Kohl, a professor in Temple's Geography and Urban Studies Department, a leading expert on Bolivia and an urban redeveloper who made nearly a dozen decrepit properties in Philadelphia livable, died July 25 of a massive heart attack.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Pope Francis is proving himself to be a genuinely holy man, a brilliant politician, and a leader who knows that reform requires a keen understanding of how creating a better future demands sophisticated invocations of the past. Nothing demonstrated all three traits better than Francis' announcement that he would make both Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII saints. The obvious political analysis here is correct: On the whole, conservative Catholics will cheer swift sainthood for John Paul, while progressive Catholics will welcome the news that an overly long process of elevating John to the same status had reached its culmination.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
Pierre Mauroy, 84, who as France's prime minister in the early 1980s implemented radical social reforms that made life easier for French workers, has died. Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said Mr. Mauroy died Friday in a hospital in a Paris suburb. He had been suffering from cancer. Mr. Mauroy was prime minister from 1981 to 1984 under Socialist President Francois Mitterrand. His reforms included cutting the legal workweek, lowering the retirement age, and raising the number of paid holidays.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|