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Social Justice

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a boom box hanging from one shoulder, an old mailbag with his possessions slung over the other shoulder and a walking stick in hand, Junebug Jabbo Jones strolls onto the stage at the Painted Bride Art Center. The bearded, middle-age black man is dressed in denim overalls topped by a sport coat. A red bandanna is tied around his throat, and a brand new trilby hat sits jauntily on his head. He looks like an odd mixture of working man, tramp and sport. Junebug is the creation of actor John O'Neal, the star and only performer in Don't Start Me to Talkin' or I'll Tell You Everything I Know: Sayings From the Life and Writings of Junebug Jabbo Jones.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | By Suzanne Gordon and Isabel Marcus
The vice-presidential candidacy of Sen. Joe Lieberman, an Orthodox Jew, should evoke alarm, not celebration, in the American Jewish community. As admirable as his religious views may be to many fellow believers, Jewish and Gentile alike, what really defines Lieberman is his repudiation of the Jewish tradition of secular humanism and support for social and economic justice. Since arriving in the United States in large numbers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the vast majority of Jews have been secular humanists who have championed public education and social insurance programs for the sick, poor, disabled and elderly.
NEWS
September 29, 2006 | By Marlene Nadle
President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's easy slide to victory in the Brazilian election this Sunday may be prevented by the disillusioned people in the social movements who originally put him in power. "We may vote for Sen. Heloisa Helena in the first round of the election," said Marcus Arruda from the Institute for Policy Alternatives. That could prevent Lula from getting more than 50 percent of the vote and force him into a runoff on Oct. 29. Heloisa Helena Lima de Moraes is a former member of Lula's Workers' Party.
NEWS
July 29, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Coates Walker, 83, of Cheyney, an advocate for peace and social justice, died of complications of diabetes July 11 at Barclay Friends Nursing Home in West Chester. In 1991, after more than 50 years as a peace activist, Mr. Walker traveled to India to receive the Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation Award, which recognizes those who promote the nonviolent ideals of Mahatma Gandhi. During World War II, Mr. Walker, a Quaker and conscientious objector, went to jail rather than fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010
African American Women and Religion By Bettye Collier-Thomas Alfred A. Knopf. 695 pp. $37.50 Reviewed by Marla Frederick Bettye Collier-Thomas' Jesus, Jobs and Justice is a tour de force for the study of women and religion. It navigates within and beyond the walls of institutional religion to delineate the tremendous contributions of African American women of faith to the larger American project. Collier-Thomas, professor of history at Temple University, makes the convincing argument that it was, indeed, the amazing networks of organizations that women developed in the 1920s and '30s that laid the foundation for the success of the civil rights movement.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caroline "Cary" Isard, 91, of Drexel Hill, an advocate for social justice, died of pneumonia at Delaware County Memorial Hospital on Wednesday, Dec. 1. Her husband of 68 years, Walter Isard, died Nov. 6. In 1956, Mrs. Isard and her husband, an economist who had just joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, moved to Drexel Hill. The corner property with seven bedrooms had plenty of room for their large family and a history appropriate for the new owners, who were Quaker civil rights activists.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - While the Vatican has picked the highly disciplined Jesuits as advance men for planning papal pilgrimages and to run its worldwide broadcasting network, the notion of a Jesuit pope is still being absorbed in the Holy See. Before Pope Francis, no one from the nearly 500-year-old missionary order had been pope. Previous popes have punished Jesuit theologians for being too progressive in preaching and teaching. The last pontiff, Benedict XVI, sent a polite but firm letter inviting the order's worldwide members to pledge "total adhesion" to Catholic doctrine, including on divorce, homosexuality, and liberation theology.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Tamaccio, 62, a man of conviction who loved this country and Philadelphia yet chose a prison term instead of fighting in Vietnam, died Dec. 21 of lymphoma at Vancouver General Hospital in British Columbia. Mr. Tamaccio moved to Vancouver Island in 2005 after decades as an activist in Philadelphia-area political, environmental and social justice causes, such as opposing nuclear energy and overdevelopment, and advocating clean water and urban housing. A longtime resident of West Mount Airy, Mr. Tamaccio was a sought-after political consultant who got out the vote through door-to-door canvassing of thousands of households, and was a leader for decades in citizen-action groups seeking to change government policies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
It was an unfortunate incident, but one that propelled artist Michelle Ortiz into a career as a muralist dedicated to social change: Ortiz was a teenager, one of the few Latinas in her private high school. Fresh from art class, she went to the school store to look for a gift for her sister. The teacher in charge told her to stop handling the goods. "She told me, 'Don't touch that because your hands are dirty,' " Ortiz recalled of the conversation in 1996. Ortiz looked at her hands, puzzled.
NEWS
May 23, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James T. Ryan, of Lansdowne, 71, a labor educator and social justice activist, died of cancer Tuesday at home. For 26 years, Dr. Ryan was director of the Training and Upgrading Fund of District 1, Local 199C of the National Union of Hospital and Healthcare Employees, AFL-CIO. The fund was created in 1974 in a collective-bargaining agreement between the union and nine Philadelphia hospitals. Its purpose is to provide educational benefits to assist union members and the community to upgrade job skills and to keep pace with increasing technological demands.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
Back in 1965, when now-U.S. Rep. John Lewis led hundreds of protesters across the Edmund Pettus Bridge from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., members of African Methodist Episcopal churches were among them. A half-century later, after two black men died at the hands of police last week in Louisiana and Minnesota, A.M.E. Church members from around the world took to the streets of Center City in protest. They were among about 30,000 A.M.E. members in the city for the denomination's quadrennial conference, which ends Wednesday at the Convention Center.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
T he Ballad of Trayvon Martin is a world premiere celebrating New Freedom Theatre's soon-to-be 50th anniversary in the beautiful Edwin Forrest mansion on North Broad Street. This docu-drama, by Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj (who also directs and choreographs) and Thomas J. Soto, is about the 2012 murder of an African American teenager Trayvon Martin. George Zimmerman, who shot and killed Martin, was later acquitted in Florida. The Black Lives Matter movement sprang from these dire events.
NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia DJs are a wise bunch. They're not just here to amuse you, but to educate and illuminate. Along with Old City's newly opened Scratch Academy Philadelphia , run by local spinner Cosmo Baker and teaching tricks of the DJ trade along with cultural and musical life lessons, comes "Dust + Dignity" at the Painted Bride Art Center . The new show uses 100 album covers and their music to promote dialogue about social justice - and to shake...
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
A GROUP of city educators who think their union has grown complacent and needs challenging is making a run at the leadership of the powerful Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The Caucus of Working Educators, a grassroots group of about 500 school staffers and others, said it has tried to effect change - more contact with members, better organization of the union's 11,000-plus members, a stronger focus on social justice - from the inside. "But we just felt like we were hitting our head against a brick wall," said Kelley Collings, a teacher at Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences who is running for a vice president position.
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
A group of city educators who think their union has grown complacent and needs challenging is making a run at the leadership of the powerful Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The Caucus of Working Educators, a grassroots group of about 500 school staffers and others, said it has tried to effect change - more contact with members, better organization of the union's 11,000-plus members, a stronger focus on social justice - from the inside. "But we just felt like we were hitting our head against a brick wall," said Kelley Collings, a teacher at Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences who is running for a vice president position.
NEWS
December 21, 2015
Armando Valladares is the author of the best-selling memoir "Against All Hope" and the recipient of the Becket Fund's 2016 Canterbury Medal In December of 1785, George Washington received a letter from Quaker abolitionist Robert Pleasants pleading with him to make a priority of ending slavery. Eighty years later - 150 years ago this month - he got his wish. This month marks the sesquicentennial of the ratification of the 13th Amendment, which officially ended the scourge of slavery in America.
SPORTS
November 12, 2015 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Columnist
HE IS PALE and unconscious now, adrift and half-frozen on a chunk of ice in the middle of the sea. You wonder what his colleagues will think when they pull Timothy Wolfe back aboard. Will they see the madness on his face? Will they hear the melancholy in his voice? Will they understand the lesson of his strange and perilous tale? This much is clear: The monster created by Wolfe and his fellow Division I presidents has escaped from the laboratory table. And the implications are staggering.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Any pope who travels from Havana to the United States on a mission to persuade Congress to uplift the poor and address global warming has to be pretty audacious. So on his coming trip, Pope Francis will no doubt spark speculation about his potential for diplomatic miracles. The Vatican is no stranger, of course, to high-level diplomacy or dialogue with communist leaders (although dealing with the current crop of U.S. legislators may be tougher). Yet it is especially fascinating to watch Pope Francis' energetic efforts to address international crises ranging from refugee flows to violence in the Mideast and Ukraine to global inequality.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some circles, Washington law professor Edgar S. Cahn, 80, is a social justice icon and poverty law pioneer whose many accomplishments changed the legal landscape. "The people who know him think he's a saint, but far too few people know him," said Martin Friedman, executive director of EducationWorks. Friedman and his local nonprofit, which runs after-school and social-justice programs in Philadelphia, Chester, and Camden, wants to change that. It hopes to increase Cahn's public profile in the region by awarding him EducationWorks' inaugural Social Justice Award at the National Constitution Center gala on Sept.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
SOMETHING beautiful happened last night at Mother Bethel AME Church. In the wake of the massacre that left nine dead Wednesday night at Emanuel AME Church, a sister church in Charleston, S.C., the parishioners were not solemn during a memorial prayer service at Mother Bethel, the original African Methodist Episcopal church. In fact, they cheered together with folks of several faiths as the church choir delivered a rousing rendition of Richard Smallwood's 1996 hymn "Total Praise. " As the choir began to end the song, Mother Bethel's own the Rev. Mark Tyler took to the podium and began to speak.
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