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Social Justice

NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Love is a lot like death: Cupid doesn't discriminate. And, it seems, he has struck again: US Weekly claims Scarlett Johansson , 26, is "smitten" with Sean Penn , who at 50 is 24 years her senior. This comes just weeks after ScarJo split up with hub Ryan Reynolds (whose dad, by the way, was with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police). Guess both are on the rebound: Sean, not so long ago, re-broke-up yet again with the divine Robin Wright after 14 years of marriage.
NEWS
January 15, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Mia Farrow, the actress and humanitarian whose persistent advocacy of human rights in sub-Saharan Africa has earned her international recognition, will receive the Marian Anderson Award in May, Mayor Nutter announced Friday. The prize is named for the Philadelphia-born contralto who used her celebrity to effect social change. Since 1998, it has been given to entertainer/activists such as Bill Cosby, Sidney Poitier, and Gregory Peck. When Anderson (1897-1993), the celebrated African American singer, met with racial intolerance, she gracefully fought for social justice.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caroline "Cary" Isard, 91, of Drexel Hill, an advocate for social justice, died of pneumonia at Delaware County Memorial Hospital on Wednesday, Dec. 1. Her husband of 68 years, Walter Isard, died Nov. 6. In 1956, Mrs. Isard and her husband, an economist who had just joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, moved to Drexel Hill. The corner property with seven bedrooms had plenty of room for their large family and a history appropriate for the new owners, who were Quaker civil rights activists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010
African American Women and Religion By Bettye Collier-Thomas Alfred A. Knopf. 695 pp. $37.50 Reviewed by Marla Frederick Bettye Collier-Thomas' Jesus, Jobs and Justice is a tour de force for the study of women and religion. It navigates within and beyond the walls of institutional religion to delineate the tremendous contributions of African American women of faith to the larger American project. Collier-Thomas, professor of history at Temple University, makes the convincing argument that it was, indeed, the amazing networks of organizations that women developed in the 1920s and '30s that laid the foundation for the success of the civil rights movement.
SPORTS
August 5, 2010
BETHLEHEM - The Eagles and the NFL should just concern themselves with the rehabilitation of Michael Vick as a football player. If that were the case, things would be easy. It simply would be a matter of whether the quarterback could still play. The other stuff - saving his soul, changing his culture, creating an agent of social change - is way beyond their pay grade. Humans have tried for millions of years to bridge the gaps of cultural differences, so that we can better understand and help one another navigate difficult times.
NEWS
June 7, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phyllis Brown, 84, formerly of Cherry Hill, co-owner of the popular Paperback Forum Cherry Hill Books when the Cherry Hill Mall opened and through the early 1980s, died of emphysema Tuesday, May 25, at her home in Oakland, Calif. For the first 15 years of Ms. Brown's marriage to her ex-husband Stanley Pogran, she focused on raising a family. But they both had envisioned owning a little bookstore one day, their daughter Lynn Kahn said. When the couple heard about Cherry Hill Mall's opening, they jumped at the chance to open a bookstore there.
NEWS
October 13, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps, by sheer volume or the absence of merit, blogs that allow anyone to publish and cell phones that make photographers of us all ultimately will dull our reactions to the strife that surrounds us. But if that happens, don't blame Harvey Finkle. A documentary photographer whose black-and-white stills are extensively exhibited and published, Finkle records the struggles of individuals in need and the activists who rally on their behalf. At demonstrations where the cause was accessibility for the disabled, justice for the criminally accused, protection for workers, or respect for cultural difference, Finkle, now 75, has stood vigil for more than 30 years on Philadelphia's streets, training his lens on emotions that exceed words.
NEWS
June 26, 2009 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
'WHERE is my vote?" screamed the protesters in the streets of Tehran. Bloodied opponents of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad made their disenfranchisement public and demanded that the world pay attention. And we did, using the magic of the Internet, logging on to Twitter and YouTube, and sharing, in real time, the agony of the Iranian people. We watched, horrified, as one young woman was murdered by government thugs and we witnessed the beatings of countless others. Votes are precious currency.
NEWS
November 18, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Maya Angelou makes me cry," the filmmaker Jonathan Demme said of the poet and co-recipient of the Marian Anderson Award, bestowed at a Kimmel Center gala last night. "And Norman Lear makes me crack up," Demme noted of Angelou's co-honoree, the TV pioneer and social activist. The event was star-studded and politically connected. Harry Belafonte, the first recipient of the award given in the name of the Philadelphia contralto who used her art in the service of social justice, sat for dinner with Demme and Judge Marjorie O. Rendell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Norman Lear, once and future king of television, manfully struggles with the remote. The new flat screen is not working, and he wants to share his latest production, "Born-Again American," an inspirational music video. Forget the uncontrollable remote. Nothing flaps the jaunty Lear, 86. His step is bouncy. His smile is wider even than the 180-degree view from his office, an aerie over Wilshire Boulevard. One week after a historic election, the man in the porkpie hat is thrilled that Declare Yourself, his voter-registration initiative, processed 2.2 million first-time voters.
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