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Social Justice

NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
For the second time this year, a group of Occupy Philly protesters have walked out of court free and clear after a Philadelphia judge on Thursday dismissed all charges against them. "I feel like this is a good day for the First Amendment and for the right of people to speak out against economic injustice," Dustin Slaughter, 32, said after leaving the courtroom at the city's Criminal Justice Center. The freelance journalist and photographer was one of 30 defendants on trial for obstruction of a highway, failure to disperse and conspiracy stemming from a protest sparked when police forced the Occupiers from their Dilworth Plaza encampment outside City Hall on Nov. 30. After hearing from the lone prosecution witness, police Capt.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
In March 2011, a former Rider University professor went to Philadelphia International Airport to meet a woman and her 13-year-old daughter he had met in an online chat room. In reality, Austin Ayers Winther had been communicating with an undercover police officer from Boise, Idaho, who was posing as both the woman and her daughter, "Jen. " Winther arrived at the airport expecting to have sex with the pair at a nearby hotel. Instead, he was met by federal agents. Winther, 65, of West Mount Airy, was sentenced Friday to more than seven years in federal prison and 10 years of supervised release.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the third day in August in 1965 when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. held street-corner rallies throughout Philadelphia. Thousands waited for hours to see him at 13th and Fitzwater Streets, in the heart of the notorious Hawthorne Square high-rises, a public-housing project that was like a vertical slum. King was planning his March on Washington, and Louise Hanible, 72, can recall his plea that day. "He said, 'If you can't run, walk. If you can't walk, crawl, but make it your business to be part of the March on Washington,' " Hanible said.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Elizabeth Catlett, 96, a sculptor and printmaker renowned for her dignified portrayals of African American and Mexican women who was barred from her home country for political activism, died Monday in Cuernavaca, Mexico, where she had lived since 1976. Born in Washington, D.C., Ms. Catlett moved to Mexico in 1946, became friends with great Mexican muralist Diego Rivera and others in his circle, and married Mexican artist Francisco Mora. She became known for her commitment to winning greater rights for black people, women and workers in the United States and her adopted country.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Reity O'Brien and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Reity O’Brien and Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Fatimah Ali, 56, a fierce advocate for social justice who broadcast her views on local radio and wrote a column for the Philadelphia Daily News from 2006 to 2011, died in her sleep Monday, Jan. 23, in her North Philadelphia home. One of her daughters, Khadija Ahmaddiya, said the cause of death was not known. "She lived life on her own terms," said her former husband, State Sen. Vincent Hughes. "She was very thoughtful, very insightful, very intelligent, and very committed to social change.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Lewis L. Gould
President Obama recently spoke in Osawatomie, Kan., the site of Theodore Roosevelt's New Nationalism speech in August 1910, to set the major themes for his 2012 reelection campaign. What would the Rough Rider have thought of his successor's invocation of his call for social justice and a strong president to implement that program? While it is impossible to say what a man who died in 1919 would have thought of contemporary events, the broad themes of Obama's speech - economic inequality, the need for regulation, and the use of government power - echoed what Roosevelt had to say a century ago in his own race for the White House.
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