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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading her grandmother's diary descriptions on the way to Philadelphia, Susan Gibbs imagined the great ship in its heyday: ladies in their mink stoles, ballroom dancing, indoor pool, champagne, luxurious spa, and pleasant sea breezes. Her grandfather, William Francis Gibbs of Rittenhouse Square, had designed the world's fastest, safest, and most technologically advanced ocean liner - the SS United States - and saw its launch in 1951. His "queen of the seas" represented, for many, America's optimism and can-do spirit after World War II. The 2,000-passenger ship still holds the transatlantic speed record.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Anastasia Dellaccio grew up in Wynnewood and is a senior outreach associate with the
After months of hard work and planning, I took my seat on a Tuesday morning in the Rio+Social audience, plugged in my computer, my phone, and my other phone, opened up all of my social-media channels, and waited anxiously for the program to begin.   As others took their seats and plugged in, I witnessed firsthand a connection between those in the room and the thousands of tweets that began to stream in with the hashtag #RioPlusSocial. From prominent figures such as Leonardo DiCaprio to concerned global citizens, tweets poured in, creating a global conversation.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the stock market event of the year, sure to make millions of dollars for venture capitalists, investment banks and other financiers, and billions for Facebook's founders and earliest backers. It was a cultural benchmark - the day when the phenomenon of "social media," a term many consider synonymous with the company Mark Zuckerberg created, finally cashed in on years of massive and growing buzz. But Thursday's initial public offering for Facebook shares - the most ballyhooed IPO since Google, and successful enough to value Facebook at $104 billion - arrived with some large question marks posted on its wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | By Dan Gross
LOCAL TATTOO ARTIST Shane O'Neill is Spike TV's "Ink Master. " O'Neill, 39, won $100,000 and a profile in Inked magazine on the show's finale last night. O'Neill, who operates Infamous Tattoo Co. locations in Willow Grove and in Middletown, Del., told the People's Paper's Lauren McCutcheon that he had a feeling all season that he would win. "I was winning the most challenges. At the very end, I wasn't surprised, but I wasn't expecting it either," O'Neill said.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that Rick Santorum has suspended his campaign and the race is on between President Obama and Mitt Romney, an unprecedented media war has begun. We've seen big media battles before. But in money, in woman- and man-hours, and in technical and strategic sophistication, this will be the biggest ever. Especially in Pennsylvania and other swing states, you'll see television ads from both camps, and from the semianonymous political action committees that have become the coin of the 2012 realm.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sofia Westin, DOWNINGTOWN EAST HIGH SCHOOL
At Downingtown East High School, teacher Amy Tordone has to compete with Twitter and Facebook for students' attention. She also knows that her students must work on skills often missing from a world of 140-character tweets and minute-by-minute status updates. So Tordone has changed her curriculum by reemphasizing basic concepts, ways of thinking, and note-taking in her Advanced Placement Government class. She always has something for students to read, then follows it up with some form of social media.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I KNOW the press is powerful. But wow, folks, really? The media got Kathryn Knott fired? Color me shocked by the readers who have taken issue with "the media" for some very critical coverage of Knott, the Lansdale Hospital ER tech who posted breathtakingly degrading Tweets about her patients. In my last column, I dared to suggest that Knott wasn't worthy of her job. Apparently, the hospital's parent company, Abington Health, thought she wasn't, either. On Thursday, they canned Knott, which one reader blames me for. "Congratulations.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER, And Daniel Victor, PHILLY.COM
Before President Obama announced that Osama bin Laden was dead, the news already had spread to all corners of the world and a lot of it was pushed out through social media. A computer programmer working late near bin Laden's mansion in Abbottabad, Pakistan, realized - after the fact - that he had inadvertently written the first public account of the military operation on Twitter.com. "Helicopter hovering above Abbottabad at 1AM (is a rare event)," tweeted Sohaib Athar at 4 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.
SPORTS
January 31, 2013 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
LeSean McCoy deleted the Twitter account he used to attack the mother of his child over the weekend. That was considerate of him. Unfortunately, he can't come around and scrub all of our memories, one by one. So we can't pretend we don't know way too much about McCoy, his character, and his personal life. You may feel that this whole thing is nobody's business and so shouldn't be the subject of a column. I would counter that it's the subject of a column only because McCoy inflicted his ugly personal business on the rest of us. When a college football player was very nice to a woman who didn't exist, it became the biggest story in the country.
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NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dan Reimold, a journalism professor at St. Joseph's University who founded the influential blog College Media Matters, died unexpectedly this week. Hours after the school announced his death Friday, tributes to Reimold, 34, were growing on nearly every media-industry blog in the country - Poynter.org, Nieman Journalism Lab, MediaShift, the Associated Collegiate Press, and others. "He was undisputedly the foremost scholar on college media today," College Media Association president Rachele Kanigel said in an article.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twitter, Facebook, Instagram - the trinity of social media - have changed the way public relations professionals do business. Where once they worked mostly to get their clients in print, more PR professionals now are needed to curate a company's Web content, devise online campaigns, and develop strategies to deal with complaints and maintain corporate reputations. "The advent and continual evolution of social media has made PR even more critical to organizations," said Kate Shields, president of Vault Communications in Plymouth Meeting.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an age of viral marketing, Methacton School District officials are learning a lesson about how a PR campaign can become toxic in a hurry. In February, a news release heralding a unanimous board vote to consider closing an elementary school was written up and circulated by a school director. But it was written before the meeting took place, as inquisitive parents and activists would later learn from a right-to-know request that unearthed other embarrassing documents. One mapped out a public-relations strategy, warning that an "emotional environment" required "some visible response.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2015
D EAR ABBY: A family member has recently lost more than 100 pounds running and doing yoga. She looks fantastic. Yoga is the focus of her life now, and she posts daily photos of herself on social media. In many of them she is scantily clad and in poses some might consider risque. Whenever she attends family gatherings or outings to public places, she wants to take pictures of herself in various poses. This makes some of the people she's with uncomfortable. She says she doesn't care what others think, but there have been quite a few negative comments about this, and people have "unfollowed" her on social media.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the season of musical acts got underway this summer at the Mann Center, general manager Jerry Grabey noticed a trend: "More and more of our artist riders were asking that selfie sticks not be allowed in. " So in the interest of having a single, unified policy for the entire season, he and his staff made the call: Selfie sticks are out. "It's a question of safety," Grabey said. "It's also an inconvenience to other patrons. " But with the ruling came a new marketing opportunity: A selfie station at the Citizens Bank kiosk on the Mann's campus, complete with a scenic backdrop and selfie sticks that are distributed for use and then carefully reclaimed.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
The search for whoever assaulted hitchBOT over the weekend, tearing the little globe-trotting robot limb from limb, took a dark turn Tuesday on social media, where speculation grew that video of the attack may have been a prank - and, late in the day, two pranksters appeared to say as much. Typical of the prevailing sentiment was this post from Metro Philly: "The surveillance vid of #hitchBOT's demise was just a crude ploy by 2 local funnymen to further their own fame. " The main focus of the posts was Jesse Wellens, who early Saturday tweeted a picture showing the bot in the backseat of a car, and later that night chastised the city for the attack on hitchBOT.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I am concerned about one of our children, a college student. We tried to raise her with good values and a moral code. We always strongly discouraged heavy drinking and casual sex; she is also aware of the dangers of both. I've learned now, however, that she enjoys going out drinking most weekends, uses bad language in social media (though we've definitely discussed that Internet history may live forever) and has no problem with "hooking up," though it doesn't appear she's done that often.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - What to do when you have barely $100 to your name and a retail dream you can't let go of? Two sisters, Lisa Muratore, 30, and Jaime Hannigan, 31 - neither of whom had worked in retail before - are riding the social media wave. They are using online to grow their business that started from Muratore's car trunk nearly a decade ago, and now has grown to three stores near the Jersey Shore. They started White Lotus, a women's apparel, accessories and jewelry retailer in Sea Isle City, in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
If you're under the impression that only Kim Kardashian's backside can break the Internet, clearly you're not in the know about online happenings. The fashion world's latest cyber-slayer is 18-year-old Kyemah McEntyre of East Orange, N.J., who is dazzling social media Solange Knowles-style in a brilliant red and stained-glass print prom dress made of kente cloth. The series of photos McEntyre posted of her June 4 senior prom at the Cicely L. Tyson Community School of Performing and Fine Arts has since been retweeted more than 5,000 times - complete with flaming emojis that represent fiyah (or fire)
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a closely watched case testing the limits of free speech, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday overturned the Philadelphia federal court conviction in 2011 of an Allentown-area man for threatening on his Facebook page to kill his estranged wife and an FBI agent. The case has drawn national attention, in part because of its potential to define how the government can prosecute violent statements made on social media and on the Internet. Writing for the majority, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said prosecutors must show that defendants knowingly intended in their threatening statements to issue a real threat in order to secure a conviction.
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