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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading her grandmother's diary descriptions on the way to Philadelphia, Susan Gibbs imagined the great ship in its heyday: ladies in their mink stoles, ballroom dancing, indoor pool, champagne, luxurious spa, and pleasant sea breezes. Her grandfather, William Francis Gibbs of Rittenhouse Square, had designed the world's fastest, safest, and most technologically advanced ocean liner - the SS United States - and saw its launch in 1951. His "queen of the seas" represented, for many, America's optimism and can-do spirit after World War II. The 2,000-passenger ship still holds the transatlantic speed record.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Anastasia Dellaccio grew up in Wynnewood and is a senior outreach associate with the
After months of hard work and planning, I took my seat on a Tuesday morning in the Rio+Social audience, plugged in my computer, my phone, and my other phone, opened up all of my social-media channels, and waited anxiously for the program to begin.   As others took their seats and plugged in, I witnessed firsthand a connection between those in the room and the thousands of tweets that began to stream in with the hashtag #RioPlusSocial. From prominent figures such as Leonardo DiCaprio to concerned global citizens, tweets poured in, creating a global conversation.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the stock market event of the year, sure to make millions of dollars for venture capitalists, investment banks and other financiers, and billions for Facebook's founders and earliest backers. It was a cultural benchmark - the day when the phenomenon of "social media," a term many consider synonymous with the company Mark Zuckerberg created, finally cashed in on years of massive and growing buzz. But Thursday's initial public offering for Facebook shares - the most ballyhooed IPO since Google, and successful enough to value Facebook at $104 billion - arrived with some large question marks posted on its wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | By Dan Gross
LOCAL TATTOO ARTIST Shane O'Neill is Spike TV's "Ink Master. " O'Neill, 39, won $100,000 and a profile in Inked magazine on the show's finale last night. O'Neill, who operates Infamous Tattoo Co. locations in Willow Grove and in Middletown, Del., told the People's Paper's Lauren McCutcheon that he had a feeling all season that he would win. "I was winning the most challenges. At the very end, I wasn't surprised, but I wasn't expecting it either," O'Neill said.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that Rick Santorum has suspended his campaign and the race is on between President Obama and Mitt Romney, an unprecedented media war has begun. We've seen big media battles before. But in money, in woman- and man-hours, and in technical and strategic sophistication, this will be the biggest ever. Especially in Pennsylvania and other swing states, you'll see television ads from both camps, and from the semianonymous political action committees that have become the coin of the 2012 realm.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Kierra Walker-Crafton, CONSTITUTION HIGH SCHOOL
Two years ago, two friends at a Philadelphia high school turned on each other and began a hallway fight sparked by a rumor on Twitter and Facebook. As the fight escalated, onlookers pulled out their smartphones and began recording the action. Shortly thereafter, the "winner" of this school brawl posted the unsettling video on Facebook for all to see. This incident spurred a debate at Constitution High about what role social media have, if any, in conflict resolution. "Social media is funny, in that we can see fights from across the country from somewhere like Los Angeles," said Kathleen Melville, an English teacher at Constitution High.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sofia Westin, DOWNINGTOWN EAST HIGH SCHOOL
At Downingtown East High School, teacher Amy Tordone has to compete with Twitter and Facebook for students' attention. She also knows that her students must work on skills often missing from a world of 140-character tweets and minute-by-minute status updates. So Tordone has changed her curriculum by reemphasizing basic concepts, ways of thinking, and note-taking in her Advanced Placement Government class. She always has something for students to read, then follows it up with some form of social media.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I KNOW the press is powerful. But wow, folks, really? The media got Kathryn Knott fired? Color me shocked by the readers who have taken issue with "the media" for some very critical coverage of Knott, the Lansdale Hospital ER tech who posted breathtakingly degrading Tweets about her patients. In my last column, I dared to suggest that Knott wasn't worthy of her job. Apparently, the hospital's parent company, Abington Health, thought she wasn't, either. On Thursday, they canned Knott, which one reader blames me for. "Congratulations.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER, And Daniel Victor, PHILLY.COM
Before President Obama announced that Osama bin Laden was dead, the news already had spread to all corners of the world and a lot of it was pushed out through social media. A computer programmer working late near bin Laden's mansion in Abbottabad, Pakistan, realized - after the fact - that he had inadvertently written the first public account of the military operation on Twitter.com. "Helicopter hovering above Abbottabad at 1AM (is a rare event)," tweeted Sohaib Athar at 4 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF THEATER CRITIC
Massacres erupt from San Diego to Paris. Archaeologists recently announced the discovery in Kenya of human remains from a prehistoric tribe that met a brutal end about 10,000 years ago. And then there's Syria and Ukraine. Is deadly violence simply basic to human DNA? Are we all just sharks on land? So it would seem, judging from the undermotivated widespread carnage in the enterprising, entertaining - but not quite fully thought-out - Kristoffer Diaz play #therevolution , presented by InterAct Theatre, in which two giggly lesbian millennials have murdered enough people that they now rule the world.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2016
Long before prom queens became a focus of reality TV, South Philadelphia's Zinni family was outfitting young women for the big dance. What Jennie and Louis Zinni did not have to contend with when they opened for business on South 12th Street in 1946 was social media. In the retail business, it can be both a blessing and a curse, said Carolyn Zinni, the daughter who carries on Zinni's of Philadelphia, albeit in Springfield, Delaware County. Lousy reviews on Yelp or snarky remarks on Twitter can reach thousands in no time and ruin a business.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I've realized that every time I talk to a particular friend, I come away exhausted from our interactions. She thinks she's a failure, she thinks all effort toward any achievement is a waste because she's doomed to fail, other people do better than her at some things, so why bother, etc. I've tried to incorporate advice you've given before, like asking her what steps she wants to take, or recommending a counselor. But as soon as I ask, she no longer has an interest in continuing the conversation, and says, "Oh, I think once I find time to do X, it'll be better, so I don't need to stop saying mean things about myself now. " But then she never does X. And I just . . . I'm at a loss.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, STAFF WRITER
Amid a slew of social media posts and rampant rumors about out-of-control fighting and violence in two schools, Coatesville Area School District officials say they are beefing up security, adding private guards, and planning a walk-through with local law enforcement to scope out any trouble spots. The tighter safety measures come as officials in the Chester County district continue to insist that fighting at the 9/10 Center - the school for high school freshmen and sophomores - is no worse than in previous years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
If there is one thing the world doesn't need any more of, it's grown women judging other grown women's character based on fashion choices. It's old. It's tired. It's unnecessary. But with Twitter, it's all too easy. That is why Ayesha Curry's unsolicited and judgmental commentary on the state of women's fashion is still trending hard on the social media site. The 26-year-old wife of Golden State Warriors' point guard Stephen Curry, and mom of little girl Riley, was thumbing through her Style Weekly Saturday night when she realized that - gasp - women in Hollywood show a lot of skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plight of girls bullied by other girls has yielded several good films, from Lindsay Lohan in Tina Fey's 2004 comedy, Mean Girls to last year's sophisticated faux-documentary, A Girl Like Her , by indie auteur Amy S. Weber. Mean Girls was too slick and funny to be taken seriously as social commentary, while Weber's offering was perhaps a bit too cerebral to win a mass audience. Actor-turned-director Tara Subkoff walks the fine line between popular success and serious critique with her visually arresting satire, #Horror . A rich, layered story that stitches together elements from teen comedies and slasher films, #Horror mounts a fearless, savage - if seriously over-the-top - attack on the shortcomings of a generation of girls raised on social media.
NEWS
November 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two tumultuous weeks, Richie Torres will return to the campus of Washington College following the holiday break with a mission: Get fellow students to stop using Yik Yak. The app, a social-media platform used to post anonymous messages, has exploded in popularity on college campuses. Administrators even use it to gauge student moods. But Torres and other friends blame cyberbullying, in part, for the suicide of Jacob Marberger, the Cheltenham Township teen whose disappearance this month sparked a multistate search, halted classes, and brought a national spotlight to the small college in Chestertown, Md. "We're all telling people to uninstall Yik Yak, because it's harmful," said Torres, a Washington College sophomore who was close friends with Marberger.
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Tredyffrin/Easttown School District is among the elite of the region, but Chester County officials say it has at least one thing in common with every district in the county - and others across the country: students barely in their teens sexting. A fourth T/E student has been charged with distributing sexually explicit images, District Attorney Tom Hogan announced Thursday, in a case that continues to roil the district's middle and high schools, which are among the top-ranked in the state academically.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Carolyn Roth was 10 when she lost her grandmother to Alzheimer's. Later, as an adult, when she became chairwoman of the Philadelphia Walk to End Alzheimer's, she considered a tattoo: It would be a lasting memorial to her grandmother, and, at the same time, draw attention to a cause near and dear to her heart. So, three years ago, she got on her shoulder some carnations to represent her grandmother's January birthday, Latin words that translate to "Grandmother, I carry your memory in my heart," and a forget-me-not - the logo of the Alzheimer's Association.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The romance began on Facebook and ended on the third date, after Laura Selvage's new boyfriend made some "creepy comments" when she fell asleep near him as they watched a movie at her parents' Baltimore-area home. Then followed a campaign of abusive calls and text messages, and the sabotage of her social media accounts and emails. Selvage said she sought a restraining order, but was denied. Baltimore County authorities did not seem interested in prosecuting, she said. But in October 2011, Selvage told a Philadelphia jury Tuesday, a Baltimore police officer called and said she should contact Philadelphia police detectives.
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