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March 6, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading her grandmother's diary descriptions on the way to Philadelphia, Susan Gibbs imagined the great ship in its heyday: ladies in their mink stoles, ballroom dancing, indoor pool, champagne, luxurious spa, and pleasant sea breezes. Her grandfather, William Francis Gibbs of Rittenhouse Square, had designed the world's fastest, safest, and most technologically advanced ocean liner - the SS United States - and saw its launch in 1951. His "queen of the seas" represented, for many, America's optimism and can-do spirit after World War II. The 2,000-passenger ship still holds the transatlantic speed record.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Anastasia Dellaccio grew up in Wynnewood and is a senior outreach associate with the
After months of hard work and planning, I took my seat on a Tuesday morning in the Rio+Social audience, plugged in my computer, my phone, and my other phone, opened up all of my social-media channels, and waited anxiously for the program to begin.   As others took their seats and plugged in, I witnessed firsthand a connection between those in the room and the thousands of tweets that began to stream in with the hashtag #RioPlusSocial. From prominent figures such as Leonardo DiCaprio to concerned global citizens, tweets poured in, creating a global conversation.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the stock market event of the year, sure to make millions of dollars for venture capitalists, investment banks and other financiers, and billions for Facebook's founders and earliest backers. It was a cultural benchmark - the day when the phenomenon of "social media," a term many consider synonymous with the company Mark Zuckerberg created, finally cashed in on years of massive and growing buzz. But Thursday's initial public offering for Facebook shares - the most ballyhooed IPO since Google, and successful enough to value Facebook at $104 billion - arrived with some large question marks posted on its wall.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that Rick Santorum has suspended his campaign and the race is on between President Obama and Mitt Romney, an unprecedented media war has begun. We've seen big media battles before. But in money, in woman- and man-hours, and in technical and strategic sophistication, this will be the biggest ever. Especially in Pennsylvania and other swing states, you'll see television ads from both camps, and from the semianonymous political action committees that have become the coin of the 2012 realm.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | By Dan Gross
LOCAL TATTOO ARTIST Shane O'Neill is Spike TV's "Ink Master. " O'Neill, 39, won $100,000 and a profile in Inked magazine on the show's finale last night. O'Neill, who operates Infamous Tattoo Co. locations in Willow Grove and in Middletown, Del., told the People's Paper's Lauren McCutcheon that he had a feeling all season that he would win. "I was winning the most challenges. At the very end, I wasn't surprised, but I wasn't expecting it either," O'Neill said.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sofia Westin, DOWNINGTOWN EAST HIGH SCHOOL
At Downingtown East High School, teacher Amy Tordone has to compete with Twitter and Facebook for students' attention. She also knows that her students must work on skills often missing from a world of 140-character tweets and minute-by-minute status updates. So Tordone has changed her curriculum by reemphasizing basic concepts, ways of thinking, and note-taking in her Advanced Placement Government class. She always has something for students to read, then follows it up with some form of social media.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I KNOW the press is powerful. But wow, folks, really? The media got Kathryn Knott fired? Color me shocked by the readers who have taken issue with "the media" for some very critical coverage of Knott, the Lansdale Hospital ER tech who posted breathtakingly degrading Tweets about her patients. In my last column, I dared to suggest that Knott wasn't worthy of her job. Apparently, the hospital's parent company, Abington Health, thought she wasn't, either. On Thursday, they canned Knott, which one reader blames me for. "Congratulations.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Starting next school year, New Jersey public school districts will be called on to teach middle schoolers about responsible use of social media, according to recently passed legislation. Another bill, if signed by Gov. Christie, will require districts to create written policies about electronic communication between students and staff. With both pieces of legislation, the Garden State stands to become more of a part of a conversation - some would say movement - that is gaining momentum nationally.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Kierra Walker-Crafton, CONSTITUTION HIGH SCHOOL
Two years ago, two friends at a Philadelphia high school turned on each other and began a hallway fight sparked by a rumor on Twitter and Facebook. As the fight escalated, onlookers pulled out their smartphones and began recording the action. Shortly thereafter, the "winner" of this school brawl posted the unsettling video on Facebook for all to see. This incident spurred a debate at Constitution High about what role social media have, if any, in conflict resolution. "Social media is funny, in that we can see fights from across the country from somewhere like Los Angeles," said Kathleen Melville, an English teacher at Constitution High.
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NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can public conversation be social work? That question arose again in a grand conversation among hundreds of thousands of people on Twitter amid the turmoil and soul-searching of an extraordinary week. When grand juries decided not to indict police either time, marches in Philadelphia and across the country over the Aug. 9 death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., dovetailed into more marches over the July 17 death of Eric Garner on Staten Island. The question hovering over all was: Do this country's legal and law-enforcement system protect whites and African Americans equally?
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second of two parts   'We have to support the people in Ferguson," said Kashara White, 22. "We can't let them be shot by rubber bullets while we sit here twiddling our thumbs worrying about who got shot next. We have to put our bodies on the line. " White was standing in the streets of Philadelphia on Nov. 25, the day after a grand jury decided not to indict police officer Darren Wilson, who on Aug. 9 fatally shot Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. White took part in a peaceful demonstration in Philadelphia, one organized largely via social media.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
First of two parts 'Nothing should be normal or everyday about accepting all this," says Ferguson, Mo., Democratic committeewoman Patricia Bynes. "Social media has helped ensure the images and agony stay fresh in people's minds. " Ferguson stays fresh. On Sunday, members of the St. Louis Rams did a pregame salute in protest of what they saw as police violence in the fatal Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown. That angered the St. Louis Police Association, which called on the National Football League to punish the players.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The night of Ferguson was a study, according to someone who is there, in "how social media make everything everyone's business, whether you want that or not. " Ferguson Democratic Committeewoman Patricia Bynes, speaking by phone from the St. Louis suburb, said social media - "Facebook, Twitter, Vine, Vimeo, YouTube" - had helped local people share their fears and feelings. "It has kept the conversation going," she said, "and it has helped inform people about the evidence and circumstances.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day you're told to go to a dark parking lot in Southwest Philadelphia where a man will talk to you about your missing dog. "I thought that was a little bizarre," said J.J. Pierce, the Philadelphia schoolteacher whose 2-year-old black Lab, Louie, had been missing for more than a month. But bizarre or not, Pierce was game on Friday night; "no questions asked" had been her modus operandi. "Anything for Louie," she said Sunday. Members of "TeamLouie" - friends and friends of friends and soft-hearted, quick-witted social-media followers - were handling many of the details of the Louie search and told her the Friday meeting was "promising.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dawn Wells is the mother of two young boys, one of whom will turn 3 in February. It is the same age Scott McMillan was when, police say, he was beaten to death nearly three weeks ago by his mother and her boyfriend in their home in Chester County. At her home in Nova Scotia, Canada, Wells heard about the case through social media. "It doesn't matter what part of the world you're from, everyone's affected by this," she said. "It just broke my heart. " She wanted to do something for McMillan and his 6-year-old brother, who police say also was abused.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2014
HATE ON Kim Kardashian and that big, oiled-up booty of hers if you want. But she's winning. Definitely not from a moral perspective, but Kardashian isn't worried about getting laid off from work like many of the rest of us. At 34, Kim K stands to earn $85 million just for her video game (Kim Kardashian: Hollywood), according to Forbes magazine. She earned about $28 million from June 2013 to June of this year for her other endeavors, the magazine estimated in its "Celebrity 100" list, on which Kim ranked 80th.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oh, golly, yes, social media have changed the face of retirement. " So says Donna Held, 61, of Salisbury Township. She is retired and a big proponent of social media. Like Held, an increasing proportion of retired people use social media for connection, support, education, even business (call it "retirement lite"). "It sure has changed retirement," says Howard Levin, 85, of Cherry Hill. "Of course, it can become addictive - not a big problem if you're retired. " For more and more seniors it offers, in the words of Judy Shepps Battle, 71, of Kendall Park, N.J., "an experience that just wasn't there before.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abington Health requires its employees to complete computer-based training on patient-privacy regulations and responsible use of social media when they are hired. Then, there are annual reviews. These apparently were not enough to protect it from humiliation when outsiders checked out the Twitter account of an emergency-room tech after she was arrested in an attack on a gay couple in Center City. In 140-character increments, Kathryn Knott showed herself as a hard-drinking, homophobic mean girl.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I KNOW the press is powerful. But wow, folks, really? The media got Kathryn Knott fired? Color me shocked by the readers who have taken issue with "the media" for some very critical coverage of Knott, the Lansdale Hospital ER tech who posted breathtakingly degrading Tweets about her patients. In my last column, I dared to suggest that Knott wasn't worthy of her job. Apparently, the hospital's parent company, Abington Health, thought she wasn't, either. On Thursday, they canned Knott, which one reader blames me for. "Congratulations.
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