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March 6, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading her grandmother's diary descriptions on the way to Philadelphia, Susan Gibbs imagined the great ship in its heyday: ladies in their mink stoles, ballroom dancing, indoor pool, champagne, luxurious spa, and pleasant sea breezes. Her grandfather, William Francis Gibbs of Rittenhouse Square, had designed the world's fastest, safest, and most technologically advanced ocean liner - the SS United States - and saw its launch in 1951. His "queen of the seas" represented, for many, America's optimism and can-do spirit after World War II. The 2,000-passenger ship still holds the transatlantic speed record.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Anastasia Dellaccio grew up in Wynnewood and is a senior outreach associate with the
After months of hard work and planning, I took my seat on a Tuesday morning in the Rio+Social audience, plugged in my computer, my phone, and my other phone, opened up all of my social-media channels, and waited anxiously for the program to begin.   As others took their seats and plugged in, I witnessed firsthand a connection between those in the room and the thousands of tweets that began to stream in with the hashtag #RioPlusSocial. From prominent figures such as Leonardo DiCaprio to concerned global citizens, tweets poured in, creating a global conversation.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the stock market event of the year, sure to make millions of dollars for venture capitalists, investment banks and other financiers, and billions for Facebook's founders and earliest backers. It was a cultural benchmark - the day when the phenomenon of "social media," a term many consider synonymous with the company Mark Zuckerberg created, finally cashed in on years of massive and growing buzz. But Thursday's initial public offering for Facebook shares - the most ballyhooed IPO since Google, and successful enough to value Facebook at $104 billion - arrived with some large question marks posted on its wall.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that Rick Santorum has suspended his campaign and the race is on between President Obama and Mitt Romney, an unprecedented media war has begun. We've seen big media battles before. But in money, in woman- and man-hours, and in technical and strategic sophistication, this will be the biggest ever. Especially in Pennsylvania and other swing states, you'll see television ads from both camps, and from the semianonymous political action committees that have become the coin of the 2012 realm.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | By Dan Gross
LOCAL TATTOO ARTIST Shane O'Neill is Spike TV's "Ink Master. " O'Neill, 39, won $100,000 and a profile in Inked magazine on the show's finale last night. O'Neill, who operates Infamous Tattoo Co. locations in Willow Grove and in Middletown, Del., told the People's Paper's Lauren McCutcheon that he had a feeling all season that he would win. "I was winning the most challenges. At the very end, I wasn't surprised, but I wasn't expecting it either," O'Neill said.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Starting next school year, New Jersey public school districts will be called on to teach middle schoolers about responsible use of social media, according to recently passed legislation. Another bill, if signed by Gov. Christie, will require districts to create written policies about electronic communication between students and staff. With both pieces of legislation, the Garden State stands to become more of a part of a conversation - some would say movement - that is gaining momentum nationally.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Kierra Walker-Crafton, CONSTITUTION HIGH SCHOOL
Two years ago, two friends at a Philadelphia high school turned on each other and began a hallway fight sparked by a rumor on Twitter and Facebook. As the fight escalated, onlookers pulled out their smartphones and began recording the action. Shortly thereafter, the "winner" of this school brawl posted the unsettling video on Facebook for all to see. This incident spurred a debate at Constitution High about what role social media have, if any, in conflict resolution. "Social media is funny, in that we can see fights from across the country from somewhere like Los Angeles," said Kathleen Melville, an English teacher at Constitution High.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Sofia Westin, DOWNINGTOWN EAST HIGH SCHOOL
At Downingtown East High School, teacher Amy Tordone has to compete with Twitter and Facebook for students' attention. She also knows that her students must work on skills often missing from a world of 140-character tweets and minute-by-minute status updates. So Tordone has changed her curriculum by reemphasizing basic concepts, ways of thinking, and note-taking in her Advanced Placement Government class. She always has something for students to read, then follows it up with some form of social media.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I KNOW the press is powerful. But wow, folks, really? The media got Kathryn Knott fired? Color me shocked by the readers who have taken issue with "the media" for some very critical coverage of Knott, the Lansdale Hospital ER tech who posted breathtakingly degrading Tweets about her patients. In my last column, I dared to suggest that Knott wasn't worthy of her job. Apparently, the hospital's parent company, Abington Health, thought she wasn't, either. On Thursday, they canned Knott, which one reader blames me for. "Congratulations.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oh, golly, yes, social media have changed the face of retirement. " So says Donna Held, 61, of Salisbury Township. She is retired and a big proponent of social media. Like Held, an increasing proportion of retired people use social media for connection, support, education, even business (call it "retirement lite"). "It sure has changed retirement," says Howard Levin, 85, of Cherry Hill. "Of course, it can become addictive - not a big problem if you're retired. " For more and more seniors it offers, in the words of Judy Shepps Battle, 71, of Kendall Park, N.J., "an experience that just wasn't there before.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abington Health requires its employees to complete computer-based training on patient-privacy regulations and responsible use of social media when they are hired. Then, there are annual reviews. These apparently were not enough to protect it from humiliation when outsiders checked out the Twitter account of an emergency-room tech after she was arrested in an attack on a gay couple in Center City. In 140-character increments, Kathryn Knott showed herself as a hard-drinking, homophobic mean girl.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I KNOW the press is powerful. But wow, folks, really? The media got Kathryn Knott fired? Color me shocked by the readers who have taken issue with "the media" for some very critical coverage of Knott, the Lansdale Hospital ER tech who posted breathtakingly degrading Tweets about her patients. In my last column, I dared to suggest that Knott wasn't worthy of her job. Apparently, the hospital's parent company, Abington Health, thought she wasn't, either. On Thursday, they canned Knott, which one reader blames me for. "Congratulations.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A second teenager has been charged in connection with the death of a 15-year-old student and the critical wounding of another teen outside Einstein Medial Center earlier this week. Quadir Gibson, also 15, has been charged as an adult with criminal conspiracy, murder, attempted murder, aggravated assault and related offenses in the death of Aisha Abdur Rhaman, a student at Delaware Valley Charter High School killed during a large fight near the hospital on Monday. Abdur Rhaman was a block away from the fight and walking with a friend when she was shot once in the back.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S GETTING to the point where Tattle will need to run with a disclaimer: Every juicy item, tidbit or rumor you read in today's column may be taken back in tomorrow's column. Yesterday, we wrote that the three-breasted woman was a two-breasted hoax. Today, it's the group who threatened to release hacked Emma Watson nude photos. Oh, there was a threat. But it wasn't from the hackers. According to the website Business Insider, the threat source was Rantic Marketing, which pretended to be a viral marketing agency, but which was really a social experiment run by Internet pranksters.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The video Philadelphia police posted online represented a major break in a horrific case - capturing images of a group suspected in a vicious Center City attack on a gay couple. The suspects in the video - a group of young men and women laughing, smiling, and dressed for a night out - had allegedly mocked two men walking near Rittenhouse Square before beating them badly, sending both to the hospital. One of the men was also robbed, police said. Word spread, and within hours, people took to Twitter and the Internet, trawling through social media in an attempt to identify the men and women in the video and forwarding their findings to police.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
As principal at John Wister Elementary School in East Germantown, Donna Smith is used to stretching scant resources. But this year is different. "Bare necessities are difficult," she said. "During the 13 years I've been here, it's never been as bad as it is right now. My entire budget for basic supplies is a little over $3,000 for the school year. " That's less than $7 per student, making things like copy paper unaffordable luxuries. As Philadelphia public schools reopened last week in the face of an $81 million deficit and the prospect of 1,000 layoffs if a cigarette-tax hike isn't approved, supplying paper was the least of Smith's worries - which include deep cuts to crucial supportive teaching staff.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sitting in a corner booth at PYT as the lunch-crowd hum blended with the thump of some '80s dance tune, Tommy Up laughed and clicked to refresh his e-mail. "You rock!" read the latest, No. 2,105. "Proud of you," went another. Then, this flattery: "Everybody needs a boss like you. " A pastor from Delaware passed along his approval. So did a cabdriver from Illinois. Alexander Grover sent "encouragement from Boston. " "The response has been insane," Up said, talking about his decision Monday to post on Facebook a photo of a receipt that showed Eagles running back LeSean McCoy tipped 20 cents on a $61 lunch.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine if Michael Bay, of Transformers and Bad Boys fame, had directed the rom-com Bridget Jones's Diary , or if Oliver Stone remade Sleepless in Seattle . We'd get totally different - in those cases, ridiculously different - movies. The question of how various directors might handle the same story has always fascinated Hollywood producer Chris Moore, who made his name with the acclaimed 1997 sleeper hit Good Will Hunting and his fortune with the wildly successful American Pie franchise.
SPORTS
August 28, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
AN ESPN segment on Michael Sam, the Rams' openly gay defensive end, received a lot of unintended criticism yesterday. While providing an update about the rookie out of Missouri - who announced he was gay in February - reporter Josina Anderson said a Rams "defensive player told me that 'Sam is respecting our space' and that, from his perspective, he seems to think that Michael Sam is waiting to take a shower, as not to make his teammates feel uncomfortable....
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