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Social Media

ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The ink on Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill's deal with Rick Ross' record label is only five months old. But the 24-year-old master of the mix tape already has a massive audience with nearly 200,000 Twitter followers and a slew of popular YouTube videos, some of which have more than half a million hits. And even though Meek isn't nearly as famous as Jay-Z, or even 50 Cent, he was able to debut a line of men's activewear at Villa last week. Meek's lyrics may be pretty hard-core, even violent, but his fashion sense is skateboarder friendly.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
Don't miss the free Small Business Services breakfast event, "How Technology and Social Media Can Benefit Your Small Business," Thursday in the Public Meeting Room at The Inquirer, 400 N. Broad St. Networking starts at 7:30 a.m., and the event is scheduled to run until 9:30 a.m. You'll learn how small businesses are integrating new technologies and social media into their business models. The forum examines Philadelphia's obsession with good food and the small businesses that provide the best digital edge in serving their customers.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Brenden Graulau, CONSTITUTION HIGH
While players and coaches may not agree about social media, they know to be careful with it. Once the game starts, Cardinal O'Hara's Thadd Smith puts away the cell phone. "I have to stay off and stay focused," he said. But off the field, the junior football player stays active on social media as he tweets out his scholarship offers and recruiting trips. With each football scholarship he receives, Thadd Smith goes straight to social media to spread the world. "Just picked up my 5th offer," Smith tweeted on Feb. 21 after receiving a scholarship offer from Toledo.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Katie Denshaw, PENNSBURY HIGH SCHOOL
As the confetti fell from the ceiling and President Obama took the stage for his 2012 victory speech, there may have been a factor he forgot to thank - social media. And as Republican candidate Mitt Romney learned of his defeat, there may have been a factor that wasn't foremost in his mind - social media. In a world where people yearn for information at lightning speed, where perception via social media sites like Twitter and Facebook can be a candidate's best friend or worst enemy, it has become increasingly crucial for today's politician to master the information technology of the day. Kevin Arceneaux, an associate professor of political science at Temple University, has watched the use of social media grow from 2004, where they played a minor role, to the present day, where they have become "a central tool for campaigns.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Mary Kate Foley, DOWNINGTOWN WEST HIGH
Gone are the days of just buttons and banners for politicians to reach their constituents. Welcome to the new political arena full of commercials, blog posts, and hundreds of tweets. Through social media, politicians are now able to constantly display their message through endless commercials, see direct responses to their actions via Facebook or Twitter, and connect with a single person at the push of a button. As State Sen. Andy Dinniman (D., Chester) introduced legislation last year that would strengthen Pennsylvania's animal cruelty laws, his camp was overwhelmed with positive feedback from the animal-loving community.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The night of Ferguson was a study, according to someone who is there, in "how social media make everything everyone's business, whether you want that or not. " Ferguson Democratic Committeewoman Patricia Bynes, speaking by phone from the St. Louis suburb, said social media - "Facebook, Twitter, Vine, Vimeo, YouTube" - had helped local people share their fears and feelings. "It has kept the conversation going," she said, "and it has helped inform people about the evidence and circumstances.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - More than two weeks after the end of riots in London and other English cities, Britain's government and police met social-media executives Thursday to discuss how to prevent their services from being used to plot violence. But authorities did not seek new powers to shut down Facebook, Twitter, or BlackBerry Messenger in times of crisis. Police and politicians contend that young criminals used them to coordinate looting during riots in England this month. Prime Minister David Cameron has said police and intelligence agents would look at whether there should be limits on the use of social-media sites or services such as BlackBerry Messenger, which is largely cost-free, in times of disorder.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joyce Carol Oates has a point. The eminent writer was on Twitter Wednesday, discussing the political demonstrations throughout the country this year. She tweeted: "Critics of 'social media' need to acknowledge how, for all its flaws, this is a revolutionary new consciousness. " That's no writerly exaggeration. In a tumultuous year, much of the tumult was relayed, focused, stoked, and distributed through media channels other than newspapers, radio, TV, or film. From Hong Kong to Ferguson, from Mexico City to Philadelphia, social media repeatedly were harnessed to inform, create groups that shared goals and values, express outrage, solidarity, and aspiration, and organize protests.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Red Alert Israel is an app, and it is harrowing. Tied into Israel's early-warning system, it sends an alert to your phone whenever a rocket is fired into Israel. With the current Israel-Hamas conflict, it goes off all the time. Lawrence Husick, senior fellow and codirector of the center for the study of terrorism at the Foreign Research Policy Institute, calls Red Alert Israel "a punch in the gut" that "gives a dramatic sense of what it's like to live in a state of threat. " Welcome to the social-media war-within-the-war.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Normally two islands in a sea of social media, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia have had recent audience triumphs radically revising old notions that Twitter and other social media work only for young millennials. On Oct. 2, the Philadelphia Orchestra played to a full Verizon Hall on six hours' notice, aided by social media, after a prestigious visiting engagement at Carnegie Hall was abruptly canceled. The strategy: Massive contacts via e-mail, Facebook, and Twitter.
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