CollectionsSocial Media
IN THE NEWS

Social Media

NEWS
December 27, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN CAPT. LOU Campione drives down the streets of South Philly, people stop. They jump at that chance to say hi to "Lou," to ask him how everything's going, to swap information. On a recent snowy afternoon, Campione chatted up the staff of Rosica Pharmacy on Snyder Avenue near 21st Street, speculating on how deep the falling snow would pile. This wasn't police work - although Campione did visit the business to sign off on one of his district's 84 community police logs - just conversation.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
This is the year the social medium stopped being new and took its well-established place as an information source and cultural force - and farce. Not new anymore. Facebook, which turns 10, sort of, in February (when undergrad Mark Zuckerberg and pals launched Thefacebook.com at Harvard), is now a billion users strong. Its gewgaw, Instagram, the beautiful images-and-video site, passed 150 million in September. Meantime, Twitter is now big biz. At an estimated 462 million users in January, Twitter zapped past 500 million by June and now entertains an estimated 557 million registered users.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the world of social media and digital communications, 2007 was the olden days. That year, the musical NERDS debuted, to great applause, at the Philadelphia Theatre Company. The musical satire tracks the careers of Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, the world's two most famous (and richest) nerds. Now it's back, same place, running from Friday to Dec. 29. Problem is, in the world of social/mobile computing/com, 2007 is unimaginably long ago . . . pre-iPhone ! "With writing a show on technology, the blessing is, it's always relevant," says Erik Weiner, speaking from the show's rehearsal space in Manhattan with coauthor Jordan Allen-Dutton.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ten high-school students were in police custody Monday after a fight broke out at Overbrook High School, officials said. Police said no one had yet been charged in the incident. District spokesman Fernando Gallard said the fight broke out Monday morning in a third floor hallway. Four girls started the altercation, but 10 were eventually detained by police, said Gallard. Trouble began brewing between the young women over the weekend, on social media, Gallard said. A staffer visiting Overbrook from the district's central office twisted her knee trying to break up the fight.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
NINE OVERBROOK High School students were arrested yesterday by Philadelphia police after a brawl inside the school that started with a social-media spat between two girls. Six males and three females were charged with disorderly conduct, said district spokesman Fernando Gallard. At least one adult suffered minor injuries and was taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, said Officer Tanya Little, a police spokeswoman. Two of the females, ages unknown, began to fight on the third-floor hallway shortly after 10 a.m., Gallard said.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A 17-YEAR-OLD BOY has been arrested for allegedly intimidating a witness through social media in connection with a 2012 shooting. The Inquirer , citing law-enforcement sources, reported that Nasheen Anderson was pulled out of Martin Luther King High School yesterday and taken into police custody for allegedly using Twitter to post pictures of the victim of an attempted shooting, along with statements the victim made to police. The information Anderson allegedly posted was supposed to have been kept secret because it was part of a grand-jury investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
The last status update that Brendan DeVoue posted to his Facebook profile was a birthday greeting to his older brother. That was more than two months ago - an eternity in social-media time. The King of Prussia 18-year-old, though, has been sharing plenty online with his friends over at Twitter, the telegraphic platform that limits posts to 140 characters. DeVoue tweets about high school, soccer, and random life observations (I get cranky when I'm sick) multiple times a day. He also shares Vines, six-second-or-less looping videos.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA In an age when everybody has a camera and a Facebook page, it seemed for sure, for a while, that the carriage horse was dead. And even when it was plain that the horse was alive, it didn't lessen the animosity between those who want horse-drawn carriages off the streets of Philadelphia and those who think animal activists live to create drama. It was about 5 p.m. Saturday when the horse, Silver, stumbled and fell near Seventh and Sansom Streets in Center City. Juan Carlos Cruz, who on Twitter describes himself as a communications executive in Philadelphia, posted a photo of the white horse lying on its side in the street, the carriage awkwardly turned toward the sidewalk.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I think it feels divided because it is divided," says Sue Halpern by e-mail, "not only culturally, but within ourselves. " She's talking about our love-dread of social media. In a recent New York Review of Books article, Halpern, a professor at Middlebury College in Vermont, surveyed seven books, all of which worry, profoundly, about surveillance and the Web. About governments looking at our e-mail, our posts, our tweets, our info. "Many of us rely on the Internet," Halpern says, "take pleasure in social media sites like Facebook and Instagram, and yet understand that we are also leaving ourselves vulnerable - whether to employers or to the government or to advertisers and marketers or to anyone who might use the information we share in ways that we never imagined.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
ON THIS NIGHT, 75 years ago, nothing happened in a little slice of New Jersey no one's ever heard of, and the story's only grown ever since. It was Oct. 30, 1938, and Orson Welles and cast members of the "Mercury Theatre on the Air" put their own twist on the H.G. Wells science-fiction classic, War of the Worlds , telling CBS radio listeners that Martians had landed on the Wilmuth Farm in the Grover's Mill section of West Windsor Township, about...
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|