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NEWS
February 12, 2016
HOWELL, N.J . - Charges against a New Jersey woman who nursed two abandoned baby squirrels back to health have been dropped on a technicality. Maria Vaccarella, of Howell, had faced up to $500 in fines after she took in a pair of baby squirrels abandoned by their mother. Vaccarella used social media to document the rehab, which caught the attention of state Fish and Wildlife officials. She was charged in July with illegal possession of wildlife. NJ.com reports a judge dismissed the charges after finding that the summons she was issued didn't charge her with the correct offense.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF THEATER CRITIC
Massacres erupt from San Diego to Paris. Archaeologists recently announced the discovery in Kenya of human remains from a prehistoric tribe that met a brutal end about 10,000 years ago. And then there's Syria and Ukraine. Is deadly violence simply basic to human DNA? Are we all just sharks on land? So it would seem, judging from the undermotivated widespread carnage in the enterprising, entertaining - but not quite fully thought-out - Kristoffer Diaz play #therevolution , presented by InterAct Theatre, in which two giggly lesbian millennials have murdered enough people that they now rule the world.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2016
Long before prom queens became a focus of reality TV, South Philadelphia's Zinni family was outfitting young women for the big dance. What Jennie and Louis Zinni did not have to contend with when they opened for business on South 12th Street in 1946 was social media. In the retail business, it can be both a blessing and a curse, said Carolyn Zinni, the daughter who carries on Zinni's of Philadelphia, albeit in Springfield, Delaware County. Lousy reviews on Yelp or snarky remarks on Twitter can reach thousands in no time and ruin a business.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I've realized that every time I talk to a particular friend, I come away exhausted from our interactions. She thinks she's a failure, she thinks all effort toward any achievement is a waste because she's doomed to fail, other people do better than her at some things, so why bother, etc. I've tried to incorporate advice you've given before, like asking her what steps she wants to take, or recommending a counselor. But as soon as I ask, she no longer has an interest in continuing the conversation, and says, "Oh, I think once I find time to do X, it'll be better, so I don't need to stop saying mean things about myself now. " But then she never does X. And I just . . . I'm at a loss.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, STAFF WRITER
Amid a slew of social media posts and rampant rumors about out-of-control fighting and violence in two schools, Coatesville Area School District officials say they are beefing up security, adding private guards, and planning a walk-through with local law enforcement to scope out any trouble spots. The tighter safety measures come as officials in the Chester County district continue to insist that fighting at the 9/10 Center - the school for high school freshmen and sophomores - is no worse than in previous years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
If there is one thing the world doesn't need any more of, it's grown women judging other grown women's character based on fashion choices. It's old. It's tired. It's unnecessary. But with Twitter, it's all too easy. That is why Ayesha Curry's unsolicited and judgmental commentary on the state of women's fashion is still trending hard on the social media site. The 26-year-old wife of Golden State Warriors' point guard Stephen Curry, and mom of little girl Riley, was thumbing through her Style Weekly Saturday night when she realized that - gasp - women in Hollywood show a lot of skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plight of girls bullied by other girls has yielded several good films, from Lindsay Lohan in Tina Fey's 2004 comedy, Mean Girls to last year's sophisticated faux-documentary, A Girl Like Her , by indie auteur Amy S. Weber. Mean Girls was too slick and funny to be taken seriously as social commentary, while Weber's offering was perhaps a bit too cerebral to win a mass audience. Actor-turned-director Tara Subkoff walks the fine line between popular success and serious critique with her visually arresting satire, #Horror . A rich, layered story that stitches together elements from teen comedies and slasher films, #Horror mounts a fearless, savage - if seriously over-the-top - attack on the shortcomings of a generation of girls raised on social media.
NEWS
November 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two tumultuous weeks, Richie Torres will return to the campus of Washington College following the holiday break with a mission: Get fellow students to stop using Yik Yak. The app, a social-media platform used to post anonymous messages, has exploded in popularity on college campuses. Administrators even use it to gauge student moods. But Torres and other friends blame cyberbullying, in part, for the suicide of Jacob Marberger, the Cheltenham Township teen whose disappearance this month sparked a multistate search, halted classes, and brought a national spotlight to the small college in Chestertown, Md. "We're all telling people to uninstall Yik Yak, because it's harmful," said Torres, a Washington College sophomore who was close friends with Marberger.
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Tredyffrin/Easttown School District is among the elite of the region, but Chester County officials say it has at least one thing in common with every district in the county - and others across the country: students barely in their teens sexting. A fourth T/E student has been charged with distributing sexually explicit images, District Attorney Tom Hogan announced Thursday, in a case that continues to roil the district's middle and high schools, which are among the top-ranked in the state academically.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Carolyn Roth was 10 when she lost her grandmother to Alzheimer's. Later, as an adult, when she became chairwoman of the Philadelphia Walk to End Alzheimer's, she considered a tattoo: It would be a lasting memorial to her grandmother, and, at the same time, draw attention to a cause near and dear to her heart. So, three years ago, she got on her shoulder some carnations to represent her grandmother's January birthday, Latin words that translate to "Grandmother, I carry your memory in my heart," and a forget-me-not - the logo of the Alzheimer's Association.
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