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Social Policy

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NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By David Lightman, William Douglas, and Steven Thomma, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The threat of a government shutdown at 12:01 a.m. Saturday ticked closer Thursday night as White House and congressional budget negotiators again failed to reach a deal. But as the deadline neared, there were glimmers of hope that an agreement could be reached early Friday to fund the government through Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year. "We made some additional progress this evening," President Obama said after his second negotiating session of the day with House Speaker John A. Boehner (R., Ohio)
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | BY DAVID S. BRODER
The welfare-reform bill recently passed by the House may be the most consequential of the Republican Contract With America proposals yet approved on that side of the Capitol. It faces substantial alteration in the Senate and a potential presidential veto. But its passage by the House is still a dramatic reversal of 60 years of social policy. In essence, the House version ends the open-ended federal guarantee of income, food and other services to low-income families with children and, instead, provides a fixed-sum block grant for each state to use as it sees fit to assist single mothers and their kids.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony F. Bruno, 69, of Glenside, a professor of social sciences at Community College of Philadelphia and a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania, died Tuesday, Feb. 19, of cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Though his area of expertise was social work, Mr. Bruno "really was an educator. That's how he promoted himself and that's how he lived his life," said his wife, Joanne. "He was not a clinician. " Mr. Bruno, a professor at CCP since the 1970s, "specialized in teaching criminal justice courses from a social-work perspective," his wife said.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | BY LAWRENCE M. MEAD, From the New York Times
The conventional wisdom blamed racism for the Los Angeles riots. But the rioters actually seem rooted in a culture of despair beyond the reach of conventional social reform. This is the real tragedy of Los Angeles and other American cities. Most Democrats argue that urban social programs of the kind cut by Ronald Reagan should be restored. But nobody knows how to cure ghetto ills merely by providing the poor with cash or services (welfare, education, training, jobs, health care, child care)
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the behest of Gov. Mario Cuomo, a group of nationally prominent Democrats gathered in a hotel ballroom here yesterday to discuss what may become the next hot issue on the national agenda - the fate of the underclass. The issue, which has already generated considerable debate in academic and intellectual circles, concerns how best to break the cycle of dependency and despair afflicting several million welfare recipients, most of them unwed black mothers living with children in urban ghettos.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Geraldine Saunders Jones, 73, of Wyncote, a social worker and pastor's wife who did not let a physical handicap stop her from carrying out her life's work, died Monday, Oct. 27, at Dresher Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center. A Philadelphia native, Mrs. Jones married her college sweetheart, the Rev. G. Daniel Jones, on Nov. 27, 1965, in Tioga Presbyterian Church. The two built a life around his pastoral assignments and her social work. Three years later, as she was driving on Route 128 around Boston, an 18-wheel tractor-trailer collided with her car. The accident left Mrs. Jones a paraplegic using a wheelchair, but her spirit was undaunted.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Problems of the GOP As I read Robert W. Patterson's commentary, I found myself in agreement that the GOP has lost majority support of the middle class through its blind focus on "free-market and limited-government abstractions" ("Dissecting a loss: GOP ticket doomed to failure by its abandonment of middle-class America," Sunday). His argument takes a faulty turn on social policy and its implications, as he cites Democratic policies that supposedly destabilize the family. He implies that these policies, which "progressively" seek to include marginalized segments of the middle class and empower women to make choices in how they live their lives, are somehow responsible for the shrinking of the middle class.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By LINO A. GRAGLIA
The Ninth Amendment has had almost no role to play in our constitutional history up to now because it was meant to eliminate a fear on the part of the drafters of the Constitution that has proven groundless. That is, no one has suggested that because certain rights are enumerated, other rights can be "denied or disparaged. " Nonetheless, the Ninth Amendment has recently become a subject of intense interest by constitutional theorists. The reason is the desperate need of liberal theorists for a constitutional provision that they can claim provides support for controversial Supreme Court "constitutional" decisions that are, in fact, without basis in the Constitution.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 15 hours of nonstop negotiations, the leaders of the 12-nation European Community reached agreement early today on two treaties that have the potential to change the face of Western Europe. In an economic treaty, they resolved to establish a single European currency and a European central bank, perhaps as early as 1997, no later than the first day of 1999. And in a political treaty, they decided to cooperate in a wide range of areas, including foreign policy and immigration, and to establish a European defense arm that could one day become a true army.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | BY RICHARD P. NATHAN, From the New York Times
Social policy is at a frightening turning point. David Duke's racist spirit threatens to bury Franklin D. Roosevelt's liberal spirit. Welfare policy has varied in tone and style in the 1970s, '80s and the first two years of the '90s. In the '70s, Richard Nixon, while playing down his domestic-policy activism, was a big spender in what still was an ebullient period. His policies largely extended the upbeat ideas of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society. He proposed a family-assistance plan rooted in the idea of a so-called negative income tax, which Congress nearly passed.
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NEWS
April 2, 2015
IMAGINE YOU and a fellow worker were fired because you "liked" a Facebook post by a former co-worker. The post criticized the employer for allegedly making mistakes on their W-2s resulting in the worker owing additional state income tax. That's just one of several cases that may come up for discussion at a Philadelphia Society for Human Resource Management seminar here today and tomorrow. The case, which went before the National Labor Relations Board and was decided on Aug. 22, involved a waitress and a cook at Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille in Waterbury, Conn.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Geraldine Saunders Jones, 73, of Wyncote, a social worker and pastor's wife who did not let a physical handicap stop her from carrying out her life's work, died Monday, Oct. 27, at Dresher Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center. A Philadelphia native, Mrs. Jones married her college sweetheart, the Rev. G. Daniel Jones, on Nov. 27, 1965, in Tioga Presbyterian Church. The two built a life around his pastoral assignments and her social work. Three years later, as she was driving on Route 128 around Boston, an 18-wheel tractor-trailer collided with her car. The accident left Mrs. Jones a paraplegic using a wheelchair, but her spirit was undaunted.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abington Health requires its employees to complete computer-based training on patient-privacy regulations and responsible use of social media when they are hired. Then, there are annual reviews. These apparently were not enough to protect it from humiliation when outsiders checked out the Twitter account of an emergency-room tech after she was arrested in an attack on a gay couple in Center City. In 140-character increments, Kathryn Knott showed herself as a hard-drinking, homophobic mean girl.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By George Will
When on March 26 the Supreme Court hears oral arguments about whether California's ban on same-sex marriages violates the constitutional right to "equal protection of the laws," these arguments will invoke the intersection of law and social science. The court should tread cautiously, if at all, on this dark and bloody ground. The Obama administration says California's law expresses "prejudice" that is "impermissible. " But same-sex marriage is a matter about which intelligent people reasonably disagree, partly because so little is known about its consequences.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Gloucester County Board of Freeholders is scheduled to vote Wednesday on revising its social media policy for county employees in an effort to comply with a recent federal labor ruling. The policy, passed in a 5-2 vote last March, holds that employees must be "respectful" to the county and coworkers on sites such as Facebook and that "the use of social media to harass, threaten, libel, malign, or discriminate against" anyone associated with the county "will not be tolerated. " Violations can result in termination of employment.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony F. Bruno, 69, of Glenside, a professor of social sciences at Community College of Philadelphia and a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania, died Tuesday, Feb. 19, of cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Though his area of expertise was social work, Mr. Bruno "really was an educator. That's how he promoted himself and that's how he lived his life," said his wife, Joanne. "He was not a clinician. " Mr. Bruno, a professor at CCP since the 1970s, "specialized in teaching criminal justice courses from a social-work perspective," his wife said.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two employees of Gloucester County have filed a federal lawsuit against the county for adopting a social-media policy they say has a chilling effect on their First Amendment right to free speech. The suit, announced Thursday by the workers' union, says the scope of the county's policy, which includes Facebook, Twitter, and text messaging, is too broad. It was filed Monday by the firm of Weissman & Mintz in U.S. District Court on behalf of Vincent Gattuso, a traffic-signal electrician, and Michael Blaszczyk, a truck driver.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Problems of the GOP As I read Robert W. Patterson's commentary, I found myself in agreement that the GOP has lost majority support of the middle class through its blind focus on "free-market and limited-government abstractions" ("Dissecting a loss: GOP ticket doomed to failure by its abandonment of middle-class America," Sunday). His argument takes a faulty turn on social policy and its implications, as he cites Democratic policies that supposedly destabilize the family. He implies that these policies, which "progressively" seek to include marginalized segments of the middle class and empower women to make choices in how they live their lives, are somehow responsible for the shrinking of the middle class.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Jan Ransom and Daily News Staff Writer
The firefighters union's got their pants all in a tweet after the Nutter administration issued rules for firefighters' use of Twitter, Facebook and other social media websites this week. Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers issued a three-page memo Wednesday detailing social media guidelines that prohibit employees from using city property for social media while on duty, prohibit any comments or images about patients, racial slurs, any other defamatory comments and anything that may affect the efficiency or effective operation of the department.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By David Lightman, William Douglas, and Steven Thomma, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The threat of a government shutdown at 12:01 a.m. Saturday ticked closer Thursday night as White House and congressional budget negotiators again failed to reach a deal. But as the deadline neared, there were glimmers of hope that an agreement could be reached early Friday to fund the government through Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year. "We made some additional progress this evening," President Obama said after his second negotiating session of the day with House Speaker John A. Boehner (R., Ohio)
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