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Social Programs

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NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Incumbent Darby Township Commissioner Lamont Jacobs says he will try to expand the township's offering of social programs if he is re-elected. Jacobs, 37, a Democrat representing the township's First Ward, said last week that he wanted to begin a program for single mothers on welfare in the township that would teach the women job-application skills. Jacobs said he had proposed the plan to the nonprofit group Community Action, which he hopes will agree to fund it. The project also would provide baby-sitting for the mothers going to job interviews.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Pam Belluck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry L. Webster, 70, who helped establish community and social service programs in Chester, Bucks and Montgomery Counties, died Friday at Leader Nursing Home in Lansdale. Mr. Webster lived in West Chester and Doylestown for more than 40 years and spent much of that time working to help local communities establish health clinics, education programs, community centers and camps. Mr. Webster was born in Coaldale, W.Va. He was a decorated Army platoon sergeant and a veteran of World War II. In 1947, he married Christine Clark and moved to West Chester, where he worked as a supervisor for Lukens Steel in Coatesville and taught science at Downingtown Industrial School.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Lori Montgomery, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Negotiations to avert the year-end fiscal cliff advanced at a glacial pace Wednesday, with a dispute over how to tackle the soaring cost of federal retirement programs emerging as the latest roadblock to progress. Democrats complained that Republicans have yet to name their price for enacting legislation that would preserve tax cuts for the vast majority of Americans next year while raising revenue from the wealthiest 2 percent. Republicans, meanwhile, insisted that it is up to President Obama to offer a plan to restrain the cost of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security - the government's biggest and fastest-growing programs - in exchange for GOP concessions on taxes.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | By Acel Moore
On Monday I had the opportunity to talk and listen to Rick Santorum, junior U.S. Senator for Pennsylvania, as he spoke to The Inquirer's Editorial Board about his favorite subjects: tax cuts, and how well the war in Iraq has gone. I know I am in danger of being called unpatriotic, but I was against the war, and from my urban perspective the jury is still out on the success of the Iraqi invasion. Now that Saddam has been deposed, the hard part comes: establishing a new governing body.
NEWS
January 16, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The attractive woman in the gray tailored suit looked the teenager in the eye and asked, "Three years from now, where do you see yourself?" LaTara Johnson, 16, cuddled her five-month-old daughter, Zahara, on her lap and confidently answered the familiar question: "Coming out of school. Going to a job. And taking care of Zaza. " "And not pregnant," the woman prompted. "Right!" the teen said. Only time will tell whether Johnson achieves her goals, but the very fact that she has set them is a good sign - and a testament to the influence of Sara Eldridge, 38, the woman in the suit.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | For The Inquirer / LAURENCE KESTERSON
The Rev. Gibbs Peterson uses music to attract people to The Potter's House, a nondenominational church he founded in a vacant building in Upper Darby. He and his wife, Marian, from Santa Fe, N.M., say they will establish social programs.
NEWS
March 18, 1986
Americans have been force-fed the argument of social programs versus defense long enough. Social programs have been the main course for decades and this tasty temptation to spend large sums of money to help the least among us has in effect become unappetizing. Is it too much of a good thing or is it too much of a bad one? Social programs, in general, have had some benefit for very few people. It is arguable that those people have been absorbed into a formidable mainstream that would have been impossible for them without some assistance.
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
Criticizing the Reagan administration's record toward the poor, a panel of prominent Democrats met yesterday to call for new directions in social programs to help the poor help themselves. The panel of nationally recognized scholars and politicians warned that if the government continues to pretend there is no problem, America soon could be faced with a lost generation of jobless, hopeless and unproductive people. "Several million people, unless we do something about it, are heading toward a permanent status as wards of the state," said former Virginia Gov. Charles S. Robb, chairman of the Democratic Leadership Council that co- sponsored the forum.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | BY MICHAEL MACFEAT
ALTHOUGH IT is great to see the Daily News endorse the work of a living Philadelphia artist, the photographer Zoe Strauss, the most interesting part of this article is that the Daily News shares the concerns regarding the Mural Arts Program put forth a decade ago by the Heretical Society, which was an independent artists' organization that provided a critique of the culture industry in Philadelphia, and which disbanded in 2001. The final statement of the Daily News editorial is very similar to the last line of the Heretical Society tract, the essay "No More Ugly Murals.
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | By Roger Mahony
Thirty years ago, the persistent condition of poor people in America gave birth to the War on Poverty. Having enjoyed two decades of economic prosperity, the country was disposed to extend assistance to those who did not benefit from that growth. Americans embraced both the spirit and purpose of those social programs with the best of America's values, intentions and tradition. Today, the rewards and benefits of economic growth are enjoyed by fewer people. While stock prices, corporate profits and productivity have climbed steadily, real wages have fallen.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Lori Montgomery, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Negotiations to avert the year-end fiscal cliff advanced at a glacial pace Wednesday, with a dispute over how to tackle the soaring cost of federal retirement programs emerging as the latest roadblock to progress. Democrats complained that Republicans have yet to name their price for enacting legislation that would preserve tax cuts for the vast majority of Americans next year while raising revenue from the wealthiest 2 percent. Republicans, meanwhile, insisted that it is up to President Obama to offer a plan to restrain the cost of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security - the government's biggest and fastest-growing programs - in exchange for GOP concessions on taxes.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Ian James and Frank Bajak, Associated Press
CARACAS, Venezuela - President Hugo Chavez won reelection Sunday, defeating challenger Henrique Capriles and gaining six more years to cement his legacy and press ahead with his crusade for socialism in Venezuela. With about 90 percent of votes counted, Chavez had more than 54 percent of the vote, and Capriles had 45 percent, National Electoral Council president Tibisay Lucena said. She said 81 percent of the nearly 19 million registered voters cast ballots, one of the largest turnouts in years.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
When President Obama in February unveiled his proposed budget, it was dismissed by Republicans as little more than a political statement because they weren't about to let Congress pass it. Since the Republican budget, which passed Thursday in the Republican-controlled House, has no chance of getting through the Democratic-majority Senate, that must make it a political statement, too. But, oh, what a statement. With its emphasis on eviscerating social programs that help the poor and downtrodden while preserving current tax rates for the wealthy - all in the name of debt reduction - the budget largely crafted by Rep. Paul Ryan (R., Wis.)
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | BY MICHAEL MACFEAT
ALTHOUGH IT is great to see the Daily News endorse the work of a living Philadelphia artist, the photographer Zoe Strauss, the most interesting part of this article is that the Daily News shares the concerns regarding the Mural Arts Program put forth a decade ago by the Heretical Society, which was an independent artists' organization that provided a critique of the culture industry in Philadelphia, and which disbanded in 2001. The final statement of the Daily News editorial is very similar to the last line of the Heretical Society tract, the essay "No More Ugly Murals.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seeking to influence the state budget debate, about 100 social service and early childhood education providers and their allies, many still hurting from funding delays incurred last year in the protracted budget battle, rallied Thursday outside the Delaware County government center in Media. Their message: Increase business taxes to help close the state budget gap, rather than cutting education and social services. They carried signs that read "We Pay Our Fair Share; Big Business Should Too," "Show Some Guts: No Service Cuts," and "Cutting Services Undercuts Children.
NEWS
January 16, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The attractive woman in the gray tailored suit looked the teenager in the eye and asked, "Three years from now, where do you see yourself?" LaTara Johnson, 16, cuddled her five-month-old daughter, Zahara, on her lap and confidently answered the familiar question: "Coming out of school. Going to a job. And taking care of Zaza. " "And not pregnant," the woman prompted. "Right!" the teen said. Only time will tell whether Johnson achieves her goals, but the very fact that she has set them is a good sign - and a testament to the influence of Sara Eldridge, 38, the woman in the suit.
NEWS
November 27, 2005 | By Alison Acosta Fraser
When Congress returns from Thanksgiving recess, lawmakers will move forward on a long-term mandatory spending budget package. This is a fancy term for programs such as Medicare and Medicaid that grow automatically each year without any budget deliberation. This spending is set to explode as the baby boomers retire. The House version of the package would save nearly $50 billion over five years, the Senate's $35 billion. Congress is right to try to rein in this spending, which threatens to dump huge debts on the backs of younger generations.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a stunning breakdown of Republican unity, House leaders failed yesterday to muster enough votes to pass $50 billion in budget savings, their ranks torn between moderate and conservative wings that rejected pleas for party discipline. The GOP leaders, who also faced unified Democratic opposition, were forced to pull the budget bill off the House floor rather than see it defeated. At the same time, rebellion by Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, a moderate Republican from Maine, blocked the Senate Finance Committee from approving a $70 billion tax-cut package, another Republican priority.
NEWS
June 1, 2005 | By Kadia Ly
I voted NO, and I'm not afraid to say it. I voted no on Sunday in a referendum on a constitution for the European Union. I said no because for me it was the right thing to do. But I have to confess, at first it was a complete yes. I didn't even know why, but I simply took one thing as a given: The idea of all of us Europeans under the same democratic constitution couldn't be a bad idea. It could only make things better for all of us, especially countries from Eastern Europe.
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