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NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By George Will
When on March 26 the Supreme Court hears oral arguments about whether California's ban on same-sex marriages violates the constitutional right to "equal protection of the laws," these arguments will invoke the intersection of law and social science. The court should tread cautiously, if at all, on this dark and bloody ground. The Obama administration says California's law expresses "prejudice" that is "impermissible. " But same-sex marriage is a matter about which intelligent people reasonably disagree, partly because so little is known about its consequences.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
TV's female commander-in-chief, Geena Davis, got cut in Round One. So did Al Franken. Oprah Winfrey made it to the "Sweet 16" but lost in a close match to real-life politician John Edwards. The favorites appear to be Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani. They rose to the "Elite Eight" this week, and that's how many candidates remain in Central High School's "Head of State 2008" forward-looking presidential contest, patterned after college basketball's "March Madness. " This is "April Madness" at the high-caliber magnet school in Philadelphia, and all seniors in social science classes are participating in the contest in which students research, write reports, debate, and vote on potential matchups.
NEWS
August 31, 2005 | David Brady
David Brady is an assistant professor of sociology at Duke University. Each August, we Americans tell ourselves a lie. Yesterday, the U.S. Census Bureau released the official poverty rates for 2004. Pundits, politicians, the media and the President almost certainly rehearsed empty remarks on why poverty is higher or lower than last year, and attributed this failure or success to things that really have nothing to do with poverty's true causes. This entire episode is profoundly dishonest.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kelly Colgan of St. Anastasia School in Newtown Square took the Best of Fair award and the 1997 Delaware County Science Fair Achievement award at the 38th annual Delaware County Science Fair, held recently at Granite Run Mall in Middletown. It featured projects by public, private and parochial middle school and high school students. Among other top award winners, the SmithKline Beecham Best of Category awards went to Nancy Hagerty, Cardinal O'Hara High School, behavioral and social science; Matthew Phillips, St. Cyril of Alexandria, biochemistry; Kristen Dickey, St. Mary Magdalen, botany; Kelly Ann Davis, St. Dorothy School, chemistry; Matthew Huenerfauth, Devon Preparatory School, computer science; Linda Harrison, Cardinal O'Hara, earth and space science; Dand Serpico, Ridley High School, engineering; Lauren Silio, St. Kevin School, environmental science; Rebecca Boudwin, St. Dorothy School, math; Kate Twilley, Cardinal O'Hara, medicine and health; John J. Newton, Ridley, microbiology; Badal Randhi, Upper Darby High School, physics; Jill Mercandante and Kristen Stewart, Ridley, team project; and Kathleen DeStefano, St. Mary Magdalen, zoology.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
Albert Hirschman, 97, who worked at prestigious colleges and institutes and wrote some of the most perceptive works of social science in his era, has died. Through his books, lectures, and essays, Dr. Hirschman, who died Dec. 10, sought to apply rigorous and rational social-science scholarship to clashes of political ideology and economic impasses - conflicts that have often fueled violence and repression. Having learned the stakes firsthand, he devoted his career to advancing economic development and the spread of democracy.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official school district document puts it blandly and euphemistically. "For the majority of his life, Aquil has not had a stable home life," it says. But the story that statement masks about 18-year-old Aquil McNair is nothing short of incredible: Since the age of 4, when his mother "put us away because she said she had to get her life together," Aquil has lived in seven foster homes and three group homes and attended 23 schools. He has been separated from his siblings and shunted from place to place, never quite knowing why. Now he's a senior at Benjamin Franklin High School, with all intentions of graduating in June and becoming a chef.
SPORTS
April 25, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Damion Lee, who had decided to transfer after playing three seasons at Drexel, will complete his final year of college basketball eligibility at Louisville. On Lee's Twitter account, there is a photo of Lee in a Louisville jersey with the words, "Louisville First Cards Forever. " The 6-foot-6 Lee, who was unavailable for comment, also mentioned on his Twitter page that he chose Louisville over Arizona, Gonzaga, Marquette, and Maryland. He will be eligible immediately and enroll at graduate school at Louisville after earning his undergraduate degree in general humanities social science at Drexel in June.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | BY ROBERT H. BORK
Virtuocracy - which may be defined as the bureaucratization of personal morality - is on the move again. We have just seen public hatred of tobacco companies whipped to a fever pitch with some dubious arguments. Now it is the turn of the liquor industry. Before we succumb once more, it would be well to examine social science and raise some questions that social science cannot answer. William J. Bennett recently noted that a high density of liquor stores and a high rate of crime often coincide.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
Moms on TV commercials are scarily omniscient, possessing Ph.D.-level knowledge of the gastrointestinal tract, sinuses, and peanut butter ("choosy mothers" and all that). Caring for kids with supreme efficiency, they lullaby and shepherd, empower and embrace. "Where," my daughter asked me one morning as we watched the endless mercantile momma-thons, "are the daddies?" Thank you, baby. The message from the tube - and the entire culture, for that matter - is that women are the superior parents, biologically built for the job. Fathers, on the other hand, are good only for barbecues and oil changes - just glorified baby-sitters, really, slightly less reliable than that nice 14-year-old Tiffany from down the street.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tomorrow is the last day for students to register for the 38th annual Delaware County Science Fair, scheduled for March 10 to 13 at Granite Run Mall in Media. Eligible students must be in sixth through 12th grades at public, private, parochial schools or home schools in the county. Projects may be entered in behavioral and social science, biochemistry, botany, chemistry, computer science, earth and space sciences, engineering, environmental science, mathematics, medicine and health, microbiology, physics, team projects and zoology.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
CELEBRITIES who worry about being pestered by fans could take a page from Richard Gere and walk around holding a cup in front of them. That will absolutely get folks to leave them alone, says Gere, who plays a homeless man in "Time Out of Mind" (opening here Friday) and who found pedestrians going out of their way to avoid him as he shot scenes for the movie in New York - in front of hidden cameras but completely undisguised. People see the cup, Gere said, not the person holding it. "We just walked out of a radio program, and there I was Richard Gere.
SPORTS
April 25, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Damion Lee, who had decided to transfer after playing three seasons at Drexel, will complete his final year of college basketball eligibility at Louisville. On Lee's Twitter account, there is a photo of Lee in a Louisville jersey with the words, "Louisville First Cards Forever. " The 6-foot-6 Lee, who was unavailable for comment, also mentioned on his Twitter page that he chose Louisville over Arizona, Gonzaga, Marquette, and Maryland. He will be eligible immediately and enroll at graduate school at Louisville after earning his undergraduate degree in general humanities social science at Drexel in June.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
HERE IS A shining example of how not to treat your opponents in elected office: U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., observes that her Republican colleagues are like wife beaters. Referring to the GOP's role in the government shutdown, she quips: "I have to say, when you start acting like you're committing domestic abuse, you've got a problem. 'I love you, dear, but you know, I'm shutting down your entire government. I love you, dear, but I'm going to default, and you're going to be weak.' Something is dreadfully wrong.
SPORTS
May 18, 2013
The men's lacrosse teams that will play for the NCAA Division I championship in Philadelphia will be determined this weekend. Winners of the quarterfinals Saturday and Sunday will advance to the semifinals at Lincoln Financial Field next Saturday at 2:30 and 5:30 p.m. The championship game is set for May 27 at 1 p.m. at the Linc. On Saturday, No. 1-seeded Syracuse will face unseeded Yale, and No. 3 Ohio State will meet unseeded Cornell at Maryland's Byrd Stadium. On Sunday, No. 4 Denver is set to play No. 5 North Carolina, and No. 2 Notre Dame will take on No. 7 Duke at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By George Will
When on March 26 the Supreme Court hears oral arguments about whether California's ban on same-sex marriages violates the constitutional right to "equal protection of the laws," these arguments will invoke the intersection of law and social science. The court should tread cautiously, if at all, on this dark and bloody ground. The Obama administration says California's law expresses "prejudice" that is "impermissible. " But same-sex marriage is a matter about which intelligent people reasonably disagree, partly because so little is known about its consequences.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama is concerned about the effect that looming, drastic across-the-board budget cuts will have on the middle class, his new chief of staff said Sunday. Congressional Republicans predicted the cuts would start as scheduled next month and blamed Obama not only for doing little to stop them but also for the idea itself. The cuts, called the sequester, would drain $85 billion from the government's budget over the next seven months. Actual cuts may be about 13 percent for defense and 9 percent for other programs, because lawmakers delayed their impact, requiring savings over a shorter period of time.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
Albert Hirschman, 97, who worked at prestigious colleges and institutes and wrote some of the most perceptive works of social science in his era, has died. Through his books, lectures, and essays, Dr. Hirschman, who died Dec. 10, sought to apply rigorous and rational social-science scholarship to clashes of political ideology and economic impasses - conflicts that have often fueled violence and repression. Having learned the stakes firsthand, he devoted his career to advancing economic development and the spread of democracy.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
LAST WEEKEND'S pre-election edition of the annual Bykofsky Family Fun Fest was held in Florida's I-4 "swing" corridor, rather than the usual location in deep-blue south Florida. We gathered in Orlando to decide the presidency and to celebrate my father's birthday (96 1/2) and mine (21++). Twelve adults and six juveniles were present, camped in a rented nine-bedroom hacienda (complete with in-ground pool, game room, 10-seat theater) - kind of a Mitt Romney-style vacation home. The $5,000 for four days was paid by patriarch Syd, the lifelong socialist who cannot make peace with the idea that he is comfortably middle class.
NEWS
June 8, 2012
By Charles Lane The Republican-dominated House has passed an amendment to cut off funding for political science research through the National Science Foundation, and you and I should be outraged. It's not the money, of course: Only $11 million of the NSF's $7 billion-plus budget goes to poli sci research. It's the principle of the thing. We can't let politicians like Jeff Flake, the Arizona Republican who sponsored the ban, decide what constitutes science worthy of federal support.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if society were changing, really rapidly, and no one noticed? Perhaps some glimpsed it here and there, but thought it was just something in the family. Or something a friend or two did. But no one ever put it all together. Eric Klinenberg, professor of sociology at New York University, says that's exactly what's happening. "More and more people are opting to live by themselves than ever before in our society," he says. "It's a global phenomenon, and in this country it's happened in the last 60 years, and we're not talking about it much.
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