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Social Security Administration

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NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANYONE with a problem, no matter how severe - or even how minor - could count on a listening ear from Clinton H. Muir. "If you needed it, he would plead a case for you," said his longtime companion, Goldie Kennedy. "He was a magnificent man, very generous, and always reaching out to help someone. " Clinton Muir, retired administrator for the Social Security Administration, a devoted churchman and civic leader, died last Monday of a heart attack. He was 93 and lived in Oak Lane.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Shaun Stanert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Kathleen Runner received an official-looking letter telling her it was important to register her newborn daughter with the Social Security Administration, she mailed in the $15 the letter requested. Runner, 21, of Levittown, knew she needed to register her daughter, Courtney, but, she said, "I had no idea the service was free. " John McBeath, district manager of the county's regional office of the Social Security Administration in Bristol Township, said Runner was the victim of a scam that uses deceptive wording to mislead people into paying for a service that is free - and just a phone call away.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Ivy Maude Jones could still work, life would be easier. Cleaning houses, caring for the sick, toiling in corporate cafeterias - Jones always had money coming in, right up until the North Philadelphia woman retired two years ago at age 74, when her heart and thyroid conspired to end her clock-punching days. But like many American elderly, Jones is now struggling without a paycheck. Her tiny pension and Social Security income can't save her from a crushing poverty that could soon have her living on the streets.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN and BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THE SOCIAL Security Administration yesterday expanded a Philadelphia-area pilot program nationally to help bar criminals from controlling benefits on behalf of the disabled and elderly. The program was launched locally in June 2012 in the wake of the Tacony dungeon case. That case made headlines after police rescued four mentally disabled people from a filthy basement where Linda Ann Weston and four co-defendants allegedly held them captive in a scheme to steal their Social Security benefits.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not every child is born with a silver spoon, but beginning Sunday, every newborn in the Philadelphia area can at least have his or her own Social Security number. Federal and state officials yesterday announced that, beginning Jan. 1, new mothers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and 23 other states will have the option of ordering their child a Social Security number when they fill out the baby's birth certificate. If this seems like the federal government is literally tracking the individual from cradle to grave, officials hope new parents will see the option as a convenience: a way to avoid some postpartum paper work.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Charlotte Ann Conaway was described by those who knew her as a "social butterfly. " That was because she had a passion for entertaining and treating friends and family with her gourmet cooking skills. Besides party guests, Char, as she was called by family and friends, favored a great-nephew, Zachary Tyler Coates, with her special homemade pound cake every birthday. "Her love of baking could be tasted in every bite of her original delicacies," her family said. Charlotte Conaway, a 28-year employee of the Social Security Administration and a devoted churchwoman, died June 26 after a lengthy illness.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former patient accused Ancora Psychiatric Hospital officials in a lawsuit filed yesterday of misappropriating her Social Security benefits. Martha Patricia Hance of Vineland said in the suit filed in U.S. District Court in Camden that the hospital improperly took her money and used it to pay her hospital bills at Ancora. Even though an Ancora physician found that Hance was capable of handling her financial affairs, the suit said, the hospital applied to the federal Social Security Administration to become her "representative payee" - meaning that Hance's benefits would go to the hospital, which would administer them on her behalf.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1988 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Would you like to make sure you get every penny due you from Social Security when you retire, or if you become disabled? And assure that your spouse and children will get the maximum Social Security benefits if you die? Of course you would. The first step is to check your Social Security earnings record - now - to make sure the maximum possible earnings have been credited toward your Social Security. The penalty for not checking could be the loss of hundreds of dollars in benefits payments later on. To be sure, the chance of losing a really large amount of money is slim.
NEWS
January 8, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten months after her husband died of cancer, Karen Capato of North Jersey chose to have his children. This week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia ruled that Capato's twin boys, conceived by artificial insemination, were entitled to Social Security survivor benefits. "This is, indeed, a new world," the three-judge panel wrote in Wednesday's decision. The boys, now 7, were conceived with sperm that their father, sick with metastasized esophageal cancer, deposited with a sperm bank about three months before his death in 2002.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By Tim Funk and Liz Chandler INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress is moving to knock down barriers that bar the IRS and Social Security Administration from sharing information that could help law enforcement identify illegal immigrants and the businesses that employ them. The two agencies routinely collect strong evidence of potential workplace crimes, including names and addresses of millions of people who are using bogus Social Security numbers, their wage records, and the identities of the bosses who knowingly hire them. But the agencies don't analyze their data to sift out likely immigration fraud - and, citing privacy rules, they won't share their millions of records so that law enforcement agencies could do that either.
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NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANYONE with a problem, no matter how severe - or even how minor - could count on a listening ear from Clinton H. Muir. "If you needed it, he would plead a case for you," said his longtime companion, Goldie Kennedy. "He was a magnificent man, very generous, and always reaching out to help someone. " Clinton Muir, retired administrator for the Social Security Administration, a devoted churchman and civic leader, died last Monday of a heart attack. He was 93 and lived in Oak Lane.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I'VE GOT A birthday coming up, and as a gift to myself, I checked my Social Security statement. If you ask, I'll say I'm 29. But truth be told, I'm getting pretty close to retirement age. (By the way, this doesn't mean I'll stop working when the time comes. Just means I won't be working as hard as I do now.) It used to be that a few months before each birthday, you would get a statement from the Social Security Administration with your estimated benefit if you elected to take it early, at 62, at your full retirement age (it's 67 for me)
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edna Faye Dubbin Sulat, 61, of West Deptford, who retired in 2011 as a field services specialist for the Social Security Administration regional office in Philadelphia, died of cancer at her home Tuesday, March 18. Most recently, she was the designer for a Social Security field office at Two Penn Center, her husband, Gerald, said. The design was complex, he said, "because not only does it include a typical field office, but it is attached to a Social Security card center. " And that combination is rare, he said, because usually a card center "does nothing but issues Social Security cards as well as replacements.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN and BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THE SOCIAL Security Administration yesterday expanded a Philadelphia-area pilot program nationally to help bar criminals from controlling benefits on behalf of the disabled and elderly. The program was launched locally in June 2012 in the wake of the Tacony dungeon case. That case made headlines after police rescued four mentally disabled people from a filthy basement where Linda Ann Weston and four co-defendants allegedly held them captive in a scheme to steal their Social Security benefits.
NEWS
January 22, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
IN OCTOBER 2011, Philadelphia police rescued four mentally disabled people from a filthy Tacony basement, where Linda Ann Weston and four codefendants allegedly held them captive in a scheme to steal their Social Security benefits. In the wake of the Tacony dungeon case, outraged congressional leaders called for swift changes to how the Social Security Administration screens and monitors people who receive benefits on behalf of the elderly and disabled. But more than two years later, advocates for senior citizens and those with disabilities say that Social Security has taken minimal steps to root out fraud and abuse within the "Representative Payee Program.
NEWS
January 22, 2014 | BY BARBARA LAKER & WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writers lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
WHEN THE cop first laid eyes on Sakinah Robinson last August, he thought she was dead. Her wrists and ankles were tightly bound to the four corners of a soiled bed. Except for a urine-soaked adult diaper, she was naked. Sgt. William McNamee saw raw burn marks on her right shoulder, cuts, bruises and burns of varying sizes and shades on her face, chest, abdomen and legs. Her emaciated body was etched with wounds. She lay motionless, her head tilted to the side; her eyes open, but vacant.
NEWS
November 8, 2013
YOU'VE HEARD of Veterans Day deals. Well, there's one special offer - access to an online tool to help the members of the nation's military maximize their Social Security benefits - that could put more money in the pockets of veterans. But it's free Monday only. The Social Security Administration's website is pretty user-friendly, and you can get a lot of free information about the options for collecting benefits. However, you won't get specific advice on what you should do. So this Veterans Day, Kiplinger Washington Editors (publisher of Kiplinger's Personal Finance magazine)
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Ivy Maude Jones could still work, life would be easier. Cleaning houses, caring for the sick, toiling in corporate cafeterias - Jones always had money coming in, right up until the North Philadelphia woman retired two years ago at age 74, when her heart and thyroid conspired to end her clock-punching days. But like many American elderly, Jones is now struggling without a paycheck. Her tiny pension and Social Security income can't save her from a crushing poverty that could soon have her living on the streets.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN'S "We Take Care of Our Own" blared as local labor leaders and a top Democrat rallied against possible federal cuts to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid and tax breaks for the rich. Taking care of their own was indeed the vibe Thursday in front of the Social Security Administration building at 4th and Spring Garden streets. "Do not mess with our Social Security. Don't mess with Medicare. Do not mess with Medicaid," U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, the city Democratic leader, told a crowd of union members and community supporters.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - More than 56 million Americans on Social Security will get raises averaging $19 a month come January, one of the smallest hikes since automatic adjustments for inflation were adopted in 1975, the government announced Tuesday. Much of the 1.7 percent increase in benefits could get wiped out by higher Medicare premiums, which are deducted from Social Security payments. At the same time, about 10 million working people who make more than $110,100 will be hit with a tax increase next year because more of their wages will be subjected to Social Security taxes.
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