CollectionsSocial Security Administration
IN THE NEWS

Social Security Administration

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANYONE with a problem, no matter how severe - or even how minor - could count on a listening ear from Clinton H. Muir. "If you needed it, he would plead a case for you," said his longtime companion, Goldie Kennedy. "He was a magnificent man, very generous, and always reaching out to help someone. " Clinton Muir, retired administrator for the Social Security Administration, a devoted churchman and civic leader, died last Monday of a heart attack. He was 93 and lived in Oak Lane.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Shaun Stanert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Kathleen Runner received an official-looking letter telling her it was important to register her newborn daughter with the Social Security Administration, she mailed in the $15 the letter requested. Runner, 21, of Levittown, knew she needed to register her daughter, Courtney, but, she said, "I had no idea the service was free. " John McBeath, district manager of the county's regional office of the Social Security Administration in Bristol Township, said Runner was the victim of a scam that uses deceptive wording to mislead people into paying for a service that is free - and just a phone call away.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors Friday unsealed an indictment charging a Wynnewood doctor with Social Security fraud. Frederick Douglas Burton, 67, of the Burton Wellness & Injury Center on City Avenue in Wynnewood, has been charged with two counts of mail fraud and attempted mail fraud. He is accused of defrauding the Social Security Administration by signing and sending letters on behalf of another doctor, Dennis Erik Fluck Von Kiel, of Lehigh County. The two letters, sent in the fall of 2013 to a law firm that helps clients obtain Social Security disability benefits, falsely contended that Burton had been treating Von Kiel for about seven years, and that Von Kiel suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and was unable to work, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 22, 2016
A Bucks County couple were sentenced to federal prison for stealing Social Security benefits intended for a relative who died in 1998, prosecutors said. Roger White, 58, and Audria White-Nunnally, 61, both of New Hope, pleaded guilty in October in federal court in Philadelphia to collecting $68,462 in retirement payments intended for a relative of White. The couple also tried to fool Social Security Administration employees during a visit into believing another elderly relative was the dead relative, prosecutors said.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN and BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THE SOCIAL Security Administration yesterday expanded a Philadelphia-area pilot program nationally to help bar criminals from controlling benefits on behalf of the disabled and elderly. The program was launched locally in June 2012 in the wake of the Tacony dungeon case. That case made headlines after police rescued four mentally disabled people from a filthy basement where Linda Ann Weston and four co-defendants allegedly held them captive in a scheme to steal their Social Security benefits.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not every child is born with a silver spoon, but beginning Sunday, every newborn in the Philadelphia area can at least have his or her own Social Security number. Federal and state officials yesterday announced that, beginning Jan. 1, new mothers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and 23 other states will have the option of ordering their child a Social Security number when they fill out the baby's birth certificate. If this seems like the federal government is literally tracking the individual from cradle to grave, officials hope new parents will see the option as a convenience: a way to avoid some postpartum paper work.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Charlotte Ann Conaway was described by those who knew her as a "social butterfly. " That was because she had a passion for entertaining and treating friends and family with her gourmet cooking skills. Besides party guests, Char, as she was called by family and friends, favored a great-nephew, Zachary Tyler Coates, with her special homemade pound cake every birthday. "Her love of baking could be tasted in every bite of her original delicacies," her family said. Charlotte Conaway, a 28-year employee of the Social Security Administration and a devoted churchwoman, died June 26 after a lengthy illness.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former patient accused Ancora Psychiatric Hospital officials in a lawsuit filed yesterday of misappropriating her Social Security benefits. Martha Patricia Hance of Vineland said in the suit filed in U.S. District Court in Camden that the hospital improperly took her money and used it to pay her hospital bills at Ancora. Even though an Ancora physician found that Hance was capable of handling her financial affairs, the suit said, the hospital applied to the federal Social Security Administration to become her "representative payee" - meaning that Hance's benefits would go to the hospital, which would administer them on her behalf.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Would raising the Social Security age fix the system? Not in an equitable manner, says Gary Burtless, a senior fellow at Brookings Institution, armed with data showing that lower-income folks tend not to live as long, and thus do not collect as much from Social Security. In fact, Social Security favors the "One Percent," who have more income and better health care. As a result, high-income Americans live longer and thus reap more benefits from Social Security. Full benefits begin at 65 or 66 for those born between 1943 and 1954.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1988 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Would you like to make sure you get every penny due you from Social Security when you retire, or if you become disabled? And assure that your spouse and children will get the maximum Social Security benefits if you die? Of course you would. The first step is to check your Social Security earnings record - now - to make sure the maximum possible earnings have been credited toward your Social Security. The penalty for not checking could be the loss of hundreds of dollars in benefits payments later on. To be sure, the chance of losing a really large amount of money is slim.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Would raising the Social Security age fix the system? Not in an equitable manner, says Gary Burtless, a senior fellow at Brookings Institution, armed with data showing that lower-income folks tend not to live as long, and thus do not collect as much from Social Security. In fact, Social Security favors the "One Percent," who have more income and better health care. As a result, high-income Americans live longer and thus reap more benefits from Social Security. Full benefits begin at 65 or 66 for those born between 1943 and 1954.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Now comes the happy ending - with a few conditions. Maziah Mills-Sorrells, 4, of West Philadelphia, has lived with the lifeless dangle of a paralyzed left arm since she was injured during childbirth. Her impoverished mother and father, who work minimum-wage jobs in fast-food restaurants, have fought for years to cope with the hardship. First, they sued the hospital where they claim Maziah was hurt. That litigation is ongoing. Then, they began a sapping three-year campaign to wrest child-disability benefits from the Social Security Administration, only to have their application denied by the federal agency three times.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors Friday unsealed an indictment charging a Wynnewood doctor with Social Security fraud. Frederick Douglas Burton, 67, of the Burton Wellness & Injury Center on City Avenue in Wynnewood, has been charged with two counts of mail fraud and attempted mail fraud. He is accused of defrauding the Social Security Administration by signing and sending letters on behalf of another doctor, Dennis Erik Fluck Von Kiel, of Lehigh County. The two letters, sent in the fall of 2013 to a law firm that helps clients obtain Social Security disability benefits, falsely contended that Burton had been treating Von Kiel for about seven years, and that Von Kiel suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and was unable to work, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 22, 2016
A Bucks County couple were sentenced to federal prison for stealing Social Security benefits intended for a relative who died in 1998, prosecutors said. Roger White, 58, and Audria White-Nunnally, 61, both of New Hope, pleaded guilty in October in federal court in Philadelphia to collecting $68,462 in retirement payments intended for a relative of White. The couple also tried to fool Social Security Administration employees during a visit into believing another elderly relative was the dead relative, prosecutors said.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
AM GOLDWIRE, who also went by the name Fredrick, died in 1998. But as far as the Social Security Administration knew, he was still alive and kicking 14 years later. His wife, Shirley Gregg Goldwire, had kept him alive on paper to receive more than $250,000 in his retirement benefits. She was sentenced yesterday to 18 months in federal prison on two counts of theft of government funds and must pay $264,021 in restitution, according to court sentencing documents. She pleaded guilty in April to converting government funds.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANYONE with a problem, no matter how severe - or even how minor - could count on a listening ear from Clinton H. Muir. "If you needed it, he would plead a case for you," said his longtime companion, Goldie Kennedy. "He was a magnificent man, very generous, and always reaching out to help someone. " Clinton Muir, retired administrator for the Social Security Administration, a devoted churchman and civic leader, died last Monday of a heart attack. He was 93 and lived in Oak Lane.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I'VE GOT A birthday coming up, and as a gift to myself, I checked my Social Security statement. If you ask, I'll say I'm 29. But truth be told, I'm getting pretty close to retirement age. (By the way, this doesn't mean I'll stop working when the time comes. Just means I won't be working as hard as I do now.) It used to be that a few months before each birthday, you would get a statement from the Social Security Administration with your estimated benefit if you elected to take it early, at 62, at your full retirement age (it's 67 for me)
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edna Faye Dubbin Sulat, 61, of West Deptford, who retired in 2011 as a field services specialist for the Social Security Administration regional office in Philadelphia, died of cancer at her home Tuesday, March 18. Most recently, she was the designer for a Social Security field office at Two Penn Center, her husband, Gerald, said. The design was complex, he said, "because not only does it include a typical field office, but it is attached to a Social Security card center. " And that combination is rare, he said, because usually a card center "does nothing but issues Social Security cards as well as replacements.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN and BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THE SOCIAL Security Administration yesterday expanded a Philadelphia-area pilot program nationally to help bar criminals from controlling benefits on behalf of the disabled and elderly. The program was launched locally in June 2012 in the wake of the Tacony dungeon case. That case made headlines after police rescued four mentally disabled people from a filthy basement where Linda Ann Weston and four co-defendants allegedly held them captive in a scheme to steal their Social Security benefits.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|