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Social Security Numbers

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NEWS
April 15, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last of 34 South Jersey cement masons admitted in federal court in Camden yesterday that they used false Social Security numbers to deceive New Jersey and the Internal Revenue Service. The masons, who gathered at the federal courthouse in Camden yesterday, Tuesday and Wednesday were accused of giving false Social Security numbers, and in some cases false names, to various contractors who employed them on short-term cement-finishing jobs while they were improperly collecting unemployment compensation.
NEWS
June 8, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Andrea Mento is upset. The 59-year-old lifelong Downingtown resident received one of about 16,600 letters the Downingtown Area School District sent May 19, saying that a freshman at Downingtown West High School had downloaded files that included their Social Security numbers, birthdays, and addresses. Now Mento, like many of the roughly 41,000 people whose info was copied, is keeping tabs on her credit records in case of identity theft, while wondering how this happened. The district, which has admitted that an employee's mistake made the information available to student access, is scrambling to make upgrades to its network.
NEWS
February 28, 2006 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's requirement that buyers provide a Social Security number to purchase a gun or obtain a concealed-weapons permit was struck down yesterday by a federal judge. The state law violated the federal Privacy Act, U.S. District Judge Juan R. Sanchez ruled. "This issue has been largely overlooked in Pennsylvania and other states for a long time," said lawyer J. Dwight Yoder, who brought the case on behalf of a retired U.S. Army officer from Lancaster. "This ruling is about privacy, not guns.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A former cellular-phone salesman was charged yesterday with stealing thousands of dollars in telephones from his employers and air time from telephone companies over the last two years. Police here and in Maple Shade, N.J., said yesterday that Pamfilo Dacua, 30, who has several Philadelphia addresses, was charged with theft and fraud. They said Dacua had used the names and Social Security numbers of numerous cellular-phone clients to fill out applications for additional cellular numbers.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Officials at Cheyney University urged students Friday to check their credit reports after an inadvertent release of their personal data, including Social Security numbers. The historically black college in Chester County apologized to students in a letter sent Friday. Cheyney said it was using a credit-monitoring firm to prevent misuse of the information. An administrative e-mail sent to all students on Thursday accidentally included a file with personal data, the university said.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Medicine Tuesday announced a data breach involving receipts from Penn Medicine Rittenhouse that were stolen last month from a locked office in Pennsylvania Hospital. Notifications of the theft were sent to 661 patients Monday, said Susan Phillips, a senior vice president and spokeswoman for the health system. She said no arrests have been made. There have been no instances of identity theft related to theft. Phillips said that was a "very low risk. " Many of the receipts were found on hospital grounds.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As the Council Rock School District implements its 1 percent earned-income tax, some residents have noticed something unusual on their tax forms. In some cases, the part of the form labeled "Your S.S. #" is filled in with nine numbers that aren't the taxpayers' Social Security numbers. They're actually fictitious Social Security numbers, assigned as "tracers" for people whose real Social Security numbers are not yet on file with Berkheimer Associates, the Exton-based tax-collection agency hired by the district.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2005 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
A Senate committee will hold hearings on identity theft and information brokers following the revelation that a data bank with information on millions of people was accessed by criminals, the committee chairman said yesterday. Democrats, including Sens. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, Dianne Feinstein of California and Charles Schumer of New York, have been calling for a Judiciary Committee inquiry into whether more regulation of companies such as ChoicePoint Inc. that buy and sell personal data is needed.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A NINTH PERSON charged in a case involving a Southwest Philadelphia tax company accused of fraudulently using the identities of foster and disabled kids on tax returns may plead guilty next week. Mohamed Conteh, of Collingdale, Delaware County, has a plea hearing slated for June 25 before U.S. District Judge Legrome Davis, according to an entry filed yesterday in his court docket. Conteh had worked as a tax preparer at Medmans Financial Services at its Woodland Avenue office, near 66th Street.
NEWS
January 19, 2005 | By J. Gary Augustson
Pennsylvania State University has always rigorously sought to ensure the privacy of personal information for those associated with the university. This security just got better. Last month, more than 138 million records were converted and 90,000 identification cards reissued in a project that has been under way for the last two years. It's all part of an effort to enhance the privacy of more than 100,000 students, faculty and staff, and the 200,000 others who have been associated with the university over the last 25 years.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Medicine Tuesday announced a data breach involving receipts from Penn Medicine Rittenhouse that were stolen last month from a locked office in Pennsylvania Hospital. Notifications of the theft were sent to 661 patients Monday, said Susan Phillips, a senior vice president and spokeswoman for the health system. She said no arrests have been made. There have been no instances of identity theft related to theft. Phillips said that was a "very low risk. " Many of the receipts were found on hospital grounds.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A NINTH PERSON charged in a case involving a Southwest Philadelphia tax company accused of fraudulently using the identities of foster and disabled kids on tax returns may plead guilty next week. Mohamed Conteh, of Collingdale, Delaware County, has a plea hearing slated for June 25 before U.S. District Judge Legrome Davis, according to an entry filed yesterday in his court docket. Conteh had worked as a tax preparer at Medmans Financial Services at its Woodland Avenue office, near 66th Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
New word: doxxing , the practice of piecing together detailed personal information from initial stuff you glean from Internet-available sources - such as when you find an e-mail address, then burrow through that to find phone numbers, addresses, info on chat rooms. It's a form of stalking. Hacker(s?) on the website exposed.su have either doxxed or hacked directly into celebrity private info, publishing photos, credit reports, mortgage details, Social Security numbers, etc. And now, says the FBI, the louts are "using" the info.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States is vulnerable to cyberattacks that could shut down financial services or destroy information that companies need for daily operations, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee said Sunday. Rep. Mike Rogers (R., Mich.) says that 95 percent of private-sector networks are vulnerable and that most have already been hit. What's being stolen? Personal identities, Social Security numbers, money from banks, blueprints for next-generation jobs. At risk are private companies and public agencies.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Officials at Cheyney University urged students Friday to check their credit reports after an inadvertent release of their personal data, including Social Security numbers. The historically black college in Chester County apologized to students in a letter sent Friday. Cheyney said it was using a credit-monitoring firm to prevent misuse of the information. An administrative e-mail sent to all students on Thursday accidentally included a file with personal data, the university said.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
AFORMER Main Line housekeeper accused of stealing a rare bust of Benjamin Franklin valued at more than $3 million was denied bail on Friday. Andrea Lawton, 46, who was arrested in Maryland on Sept. 21 by the FBI while in possession of the bust, must remain in custody pending trial. U.S. Magistrate M. Faith Angell deemed Lawton, 46, who showed up in court in a black head scarf and an olive prison jumpsuit, to be a flight risk. According to court papers, Lawton had told FBI and IRS agents that she had come to Maryland to sell the bust on the black market.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Md. man charged in 'joker' threat UPPER MARLBORO, Md. - A man accused of referring to himself as "a joker" and threatening to shoot up his workplace has been charged with misdemeanor telephone misuse, prosecutors said Wednesday. Neil E. Prescott, 28, of Crofton, was taken into custody Friday after police said they found ammunition and a cache of about two dozen weapons in his apartment. He has been undergoing an emergency psychiatric evaluation at a hospital since then. The "joker" comment prompted concern because of a mass shooting a week earlier at a Colorado movie theater screening the latest Batman movie.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | Erin Arvedlund
As if the drama in Greece weren't tragic enough, here at home we're facing "taxmageddon," a fiscal cliff, and potentially, hackers breaking into our bank and brokerage accounts. Take a deep breath. The FBI is here to help — at least with the hackers. The FBI's Philadelphia field office offers tips for investors about how to avoid getting scammed — and who to call if you do. We don't think of G-men tackling securities and investment fraud, but in fact, they do most of the nitty-gritty investigating for the regulators such as the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman and Daily News Staff Writer
A Wissinoming tax preparer was sentenced Tuesday to 10 years in prison for filing more than 1,600 bogus federal income-tax returns for tax years 2007 through 2009. Miguel Vazquez, 45, also was ordered by U.S. District Judge James Knoll Gardner to pay $1.6 million in restitution to the IRS and to surrender to the Bureau of Prisons on July 26. Federal prosecutors said the bogus returns prepared by Vazquez resulted in the payment of almost $7.5 million in refunds. The government said Vazquez, a native of Puerto Rico who has 13 children with 12 women, also lied on his own tax returns and failed to pay more than $250,000 in taxes on his illegally gained income.
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