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NEWS
December 27, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren A. Witte, 74, of Newtown, who worked throughout the country to offer aid and social assistance through Quaker organizations, died Wednesday, Dec. 17, at Temple University Hospital of an acute respiratory infection. Born in Wauwatosa, Wis., Mr. Witte spent much of his life in social service through the American Friends Service Committee and Friends Services for the Aging. After retiring in 2006, he remained involved in service through a committee he established to assist Bosnians and the Friends Board Training and Support Project, Chandler Hall and George School.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
Getting a man on the moon and winning the ground war in Kuwait in 100 hours were easy, compared to what faces us at home. America must overcome the devastation of poverty, ignorance, and hopelessness that control our inner cities. That war requires no high-tech, just common sense. Forget most of the social service jargon that has helped create the mess and stop listening to the apologists for the poor who promote all these programs. Those apologists for the poor have become poverticians ruling over a 20th century plantation.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chanting and waving signs, a group of Pennsylvania social services employees - fuming over proposed layoffs and budget cuts - staked out Dugan's Restaurant and Banquets in the Northeast yesterday morning to confront Gov. Casey on his way to a breakfast there. But the governor, riding in a black Lincoln Towne Car, eluded the 40 protesters and hardly noticed the rally. As he slipped into Dugan's to meet with members of the Northeast Catholic High School alumni association, he said: "It's their First Amendment right to do what they're doing, and it's their right to express their opinions.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, and Robert J. Terry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
Carmen Bolden, executive director of Congresso de Latinos Unidos, the state's largest Hispanic social service agency, resigned suddenly yesterday after heading the organization for 15 years. Bolden could not be reached for comment. But her attorney, Obra Kernodle, said Bolden's resignation was the result of a "mutual agreement" between her and the agency's board of directors. "There were differences and concerns raised by the board with respect to actions she has taken," Kernodle said.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By STEWART L. COHEN, ESQ
TORTURE. Inhumanity. Madness. Words are inadequate to describe the atrocities against the children and adults with mental and physical disabilities discovered in Philadelphia recently - and this is not the first time such circumstances have occurred. These individuals represent some of the most vulnerable members of society, and deserve our protection and support. The moral test of our society is how we protect our children, the elderly and disabled. In the headlines, we see the needs so clearly.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The people who work every day to help the poor of Bucks County gathered yesterday, their heads still reverberating from the U.S. Senate's vote two days ago to end the federal guarantee of aid to the poor. In a dimly lit auditorium at Bucks County Community College, 100 employees of county government, charities and private-assistance groups listened to the latest news from Washington, swallowed hard, and mulled a future they say looks bleak for their agencies and the people who depend on their services.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homeowners and apartment dwellers in Spring Garden and Francisville chose their neighborhoods for definite reasons: They are close to Center City, but far enough away to allow space for planting trees and flowers. There is easy access to public transportation and other public facilities. They have a racial, cultural and economic mix that adds flavor to their rowhouse blocks. Those are the same reasons operators of residential social service programs chose the neighborhoods.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Social service providers asked the county commissioners Wednesday to distribute county funds early to tide the agencies over during the state budget impasse. Representatives of three community mental health centers that contract to provide services for the county's Mental Health/Mental Retardation Department asked the commissioners to provide the county's matching funds even if the state does not contribute its share. The commissioners are expected to vote on the matter Wednesday.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five nonprofit social service groups excluded from the Abington Township budget this year because of the loss of federal revenue-sharing aid could receive money after all. But the township is considering taking away $6,000 from the Visiting Nurses Association to do it. "You rob Peter to pay Paul - it's always the case," said Elissa Dellamonica, the director of professional services for the nurses group. "It's frustrating in health care, because everybody's cutting. " At the Feb. 12 board meeting, the township voted to advertise a supplemental budget appropriation that called for contributions of $4,587 to the Willow Grove Senior Citizens Center; $1,147 to the Crestmont Day Care Center; $1,000 to the Aldersgate Youth Service Bureau; $428 to Vital Age, and $287 to Homemaker Health Aides.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gospel choir had the audience on its feet and clapping. And the high-profile speakers - including the White House's John DiIulio and former Philadelphia Mayor W. Wilson Goode - held their listeners' close attention. But some of the 300 local religious leaders attending a "growth and vision conference" sponsored yesterday by the University of Pennsylvania said they were unsure whether the Bush administration's plan to expand financing to faith-based social-service ministries was a good idea.
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NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE HUB OF HOPE is headed back home. After Project HOME's seasonal social-services center for the homeless was inexplicably shut out of its old space inside Suburban Station, it was told that it could return. Talk about a welcome about-face. In November, the landlord who had donated the space for the past three winters sent word that he no longer would be able to do so, "due to complaints from tenants and brokers. " What those complaints were was anyone's guess, because no one in the know was talking.
NEWS
December 27, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren A. Witte, 74, of Newtown, who worked throughout the country to offer aid and social assistance through Quaker organizations, died Wednesday, Dec. 17, at Temple University Hospital of an acute respiratory infection. Born in Wauwatosa, Wis., Mr. Witte spent much of his life in social service through the American Friends Service Committee and Friends Services for the Aging. After retiring in 2006, he remained involved in service through a committee he established to assist Bosnians and the Friends Board Training and Support Project, Chandler Hall and George School.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yuliana Vazquez of Kennett Square was 25 with an 8-month-old baby girl when doctors found a lump in her breast. Her cancer was even scarier because she did not understand her diagnosis at first. Vazquez is from Mexico, has a middle school education, and speaks little English. Add in complex medical terms and the unreliable interpreter she had found, and Vazquez was lost. She missed some of her treatments. She had to delay some appointments. The cancer later spread to her liver and bones.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THEY WERE foster kids. And disabled kids. Children who needed help. Instead, a group of tax preparers with a Southwest Philadelphia company and a former social worker with Catholic Social Services allegedly used the kids' identities to profit in a scheme by falsely claiming them as dependents on clients' income-tax returns, according to documents unsealed yesterday by the U.S. Attorney's Office. The alleged scheme lasted from about January 2008 to April 2013 and involved tax preparers with Medmans Financial Services, on 65th Street near Chester Avenue and on Woodland Avenue near 66th Street.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie made an obscure service famous when he urged people in need of social services to call the 211 hotline. In Philadelphia, that gubernatorial endorsement only drove home the absence of a similar service across the river from New Jersey. But on Monday, officials with the United Way here announced the launch of a 211 hotline for the five-county Philadelphia area. Jill Michal, president and chief executive of the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, said the current economic climate and recent nearby crises such as Sandy prompted the Pennsylvania United Way to finally fund the service.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Residents of Southeastern Pennsylvania can now dial a special phone number, 211, for help navigating social services. Kudos are due to the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey and the city of Philadelphia, which made the nearly $1 million investment needed to launch and operate the system. Too many people seeking government or charity help, especially for the first time, aren't sure where to turn, and many go without the help they need as a result. With its formal launch set for today - this being 2/11 - the new number is designed to serve as a clearinghouse for assistance, helping those in need make their way through the maze of health and human-services agencies.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - With The Who's "My Generation" playing on his earphones, dressed in crocs and plaid pajama pants, Keith Stell, 57, was happy to tell how he got to Atlantic City two months ago, a paranoid schizophrenic off his meds, a long rap sheet of drug and other arrests, just out of a Gloucester County jail. "A cop car," he said, sitting on a bench in the yard of the Atlantic City Rescue Mission with several other men who all attend the Atlantic Behavioral Health program. He said he was now on Seroquel.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Moving to protect the military from a crippling wave of budget cuts next year, a key House committee voted Monday to cut instead food aid, health care, and social services such as Meals on Wheels. The measure would require federal employees to contribute more to their pensions, saving taxpayers more than $80 billion over the coming decade, while illegal immigrants would be denied tax refunds from the $1,000-per-child tax credit. There's no companion legislation moving in the Democratic-controlled Senate, and the proposal doesn't stand a chance of making it to President Obama's desk for signature.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG — A bipartisan Senate budget plan that would restore cuts to state-supported universities, public schools, hospitals, nursing homes, and social services cleared committee and is on track for full Senate passage Wednesday. Its fate after that is less clear. The $27.7 billion spending plan, which increases spending by $500 million over Gov. Corbett's proposed budget, won rare unanimous approval in the Senate Appropriations Committee on Tuesday. The Senate plan also restores $245 million of the $253 million that was sliced from funding for the 18 schools in the State System of Higher Education, said Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Jake Corman (R., Centre)
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