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Social Welfare

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NEWS
March 16, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Israeli social worker Asher Behrend tries his hand at clay modeling with youngsters at Archway Day Care and Preschool in Camden yesterday. Behrend and others from the Israel Ministry of Social Welfare are child-care policymakers who are on a 10-day tour of South Jersey child-care facilities. They were guests of Archway, a private, non-profit, federally subsidized child-care center, one of three facilities in the city that they visited yesterday. At Archway, they joined children at circle time, read books to them, made creatures with green Play Doh, and took notes of such novelties to Israel as toys with mirrors in them.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
So-called dark-money groups spent 27 percent more on this year's elections than they did in 2010, thanks to reckless Supreme Court decisions and regulatory failures allowing unlimited, undisclosed political contributions. The groups hide donors behind the tax code, disguising themselves as "social welfare" organizations. In fact, they are an increasingly powerful and poisonous political force. Analysts say they are just beginning to flex their muscles in preparation for the main event: the 2016 presidential election.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | By Christie Balka and Lori Ginzberg
Religious values have inspired some of the most important social movements in our nation's history, including those for civil rights and the abolition of slavery. But current proposals for religious institutions to become more involved in providing social welfare services ignore the lessons of the past. Throughout the 19th century, private religious institutions were the primary source of social welfare in the United States. Those who needed food, clothing and shelter turned to religious organizations, not the welfare office.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
The day after President Obama's reelection is a good time to reflect on how the campaign was affected by a tragically flawed Supreme Court decision and others that undermined efforts to add some common sense to political spending. This is the day after more than $6 billion was spent on election campaigns, with much of it coming from barely restrained and often secretive groups. Most of that money went to TV advertising that was generally negative and further served to erode the public's confidence not only in the candidates put before it, but also in an electoral system that is supposed to be the model for the rest of the world.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By Dianne E. Reed
In the last four years, the city's spending priorities have continued to shift away from traditional services - like parks, recreation and libraries - and toward social services. For example, in three years funding for the homeless has grown from nearly nothing to $32 million. Some of this shift is a reasonable response to the fact that the city's population has a growing proportion of disadvantaged families. Ideally, the needs of this impoverished population should be paid for by redistributing resources from higher levels of government.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | BY MOLLY IVINS
The family is under siege, and the choices in this election are clear: On one side, the advocates of the liberal agenda; on the other side are you and I and those values of family that we share. " - George Bush, last week in Garfield, N.J. The headline was, "Bush Says Liberals Imperil U.S. Families. " Of course, the headlines also say Texas' unemployment rate for June was 8.3 percent, the highest in four years. Guess there are lots of different ways to imperil the family. But I was struck by how little progress we've made in the political use of The Family as an issue.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By John J. DiIulio, Jr
In his first presidential campaign speech, George W. Bush rejected as "destructive" the idea that "if government would only get out of the way, all our problems would be solved. " He pledged support for "faith-based organizations, charities, and community groups. " Once in office, he promised to help mobilize adult mentors for at-risk urban youth, and to aid the big cities they call home. "No child left behind," he repeated, is his special "charge to keep. " Anyone privileged to be around him, as I was during the first 180 days of his administration, knows that President Bush is a strong moral leader with a true heart for the poor.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By MICHAEL B. KATZ
Jack Kemp, chosen to head the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Bush administration, proposes to launch a new War on Poverty. Will he succeed any better than Lyndon Johnson, who officially began the last one in 1964? What lessons should he learn? According to many current assessments, during the years from 1964 until 1972-73, when federal social benefits in real dollars peaked, Washington threw massive amounts of money into a futile attempt to eliminate poverty.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By HARRY SCHUTE JR
Many Americans have a vision of slashing the defense budget and gleefully standing by as coffers of gold come pouring out of the Pentagon. It would be nice if it were that simple. Indeed, dividends can be saved by careful trimming of some defense fat. The stark reality remains, however, that any peace dividend taken today will be paid for sooner or later. Large, inordinate defense cuts will do two things to this nation, which will force us to pay bills in blood or money, sometime down the road.
NEWS
November 20, 1988
THE TROUBLE WITH LIBERALISM IS EDITORS LIKE BOLDT "The trouble with liberalism . . . " by David R. Boldt delivers a message unbecoming to the editorial pages of The Inquirer. Mr. Boldt relies on the work of Charles Murray who has argued that welfare programs discourage the poor from working. But Mr. Boldt ignores the research of many social scientists, including the distinguished sociologist William Julius Wilson, who have challenged Mr. Murray's conclusion. These scholars have demonstrated that changes in the level of welfare benefits do not necessarily lead to corresponding changes in the number of people on welfare or the frequency of family malformation.
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NEWS
November 6, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
So-called dark-money groups spent 27 percent more on this year's elections than they did in 2010, thanks to reckless Supreme Court decisions and regulatory failures allowing unlimited, undisclosed political contributions. The groups hide donors behind the tax code, disguising themselves as "social welfare" organizations. In fact, they are an increasingly powerful and poisonous political force. Analysts say they are just beginning to flex their muscles in preparation for the main event: the 2016 presidential election.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
The day after President Obama's reelection is a good time to reflect on how the campaign was affected by a tragically flawed Supreme Court decision and others that undermined efforts to add some common sense to political spending. This is the day after more than $6 billion was spent on election campaigns, with much of it coming from barely restrained and often secretive groups. Most of that money went to TV advertising that was generally negative and further served to erode the public's confidence not only in the candidates put before it, but also in an electoral system that is supposed to be the model for the rest of the world.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By John J. DiIulio, Jr
In his first presidential campaign speech, George W. Bush rejected as "destructive" the idea that "if government would only get out of the way, all our problems would be solved. " He pledged support for "faith-based organizations, charities, and community groups. " Once in office, he promised to help mobilize adult mentors for at-risk urban youth, and to aid the big cities they call home. "No child left behind," he repeated, is his special "charge to keep. " Anyone privileged to be around him, as I was during the first 180 days of his administration, knows that President Bush is a strong moral leader with a true heart for the poor.
NEWS
February 3, 2000
Just call your reporter 'Florence'@@f Julie's articles on hep C may aid Hawaii firefighters I have been a firefighter in Honolulu more than 23 years. In 1981, I contracted hepatitis C and was told to just continue what I was normally doing. They had no drug therapy or anything else to treat it. Four years later, I became so ill, I had to go on drug therapy (a nightmare), which failed. My financial stability was failing as well, but I kept on working, not revealing my illness, for fear of losing my job. During one treatment after another, having to take six months off (using up sick leave and vacation)
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | By Christie Balka and Lori Ginzberg
Religious values have inspired some of the most important social movements in our nation's history, including those for civil rights and the abolition of slavery. But current proposals for religious institutions to become more involved in providing social welfare services ignore the lessons of the past. Throughout the 19th century, private religious institutions were the primary source of social welfare in the United States. Those who needed food, clothing and shelter turned to religious organizations, not the welfare office.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Bill Clinton went a long way last week toward defining what he hopes history will respect about his presidency. He proposed to balance the federal budget next year for the first time in a generation and to keep it balanced, even projecting surpluses thereafter. And he committed himself to reforming by the end of 1999 the nation's two giant social-insurance programs, Medicare and Social Security, to ensure that they are financially sound for the 21st century. Both are large, ambitious goals.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alarmed by the sweeping changes proposed for the nation's social-welfare safety net, the Chester County commissioners have agreed to set up a working group to monitor what emerges from Washington and see how it will affect the county. The working group will include representatives from the county's human- service agencies. With housing, day care, and subsidized school-lunch programs on the congressional chopping block, Commissioner Andrew Dinniman said he wanted to be sure the cuts wouldn't hurt people trying to make a better life for themselves and their families.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Sergio R. Bustos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clutching an AK-47 assault rifle as a prop, Democratic Sen. Harris Wofford said yesterday that Republican opponent Rick Santorum had voted against banning such weapons because he was in the pocket of the National Rifle Association. "These are among the 19 reasons Rick Santorum voted against the crime bill," said Wofford, pointing to three assault weapons he brought to an afternoon news conference in Montgomery County. Wofford said Santorum had earned an "A" rating from the NRA and had received twice as much in NRA political contributions as any other member of Congress.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
William Chertok, local businessman and hard-charging Democratic candidate for Congress, took aim at Republican incumbent Robert S. Walker's vote against the $30.2 billion crime bill last week. The vote shows, Chertok said in a news release, that Walker is "the champion of Washington gridlock," a man who is out of touch with his constituents, and a man whose vote was bought by the National Rifle Association, a group that lobbied hard against passage of the bill. Walker represents the 16th Congressional District, which includes the central and western parts of Chester County and the eastern part of Lancaster County.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Israeli social worker Asher Behrend tries his hand at clay modeling with youngsters at Archway Day Care and Preschool in Camden yesterday. Behrend and others from the Israel Ministry of Social Welfare are child-care policymakers who are on a 10-day tour of South Jersey child-care facilities. They were guests of Archway, a private, non-profit, federally subsidized child-care center, one of three facilities in the city that they visited yesterday. At Archway, they joined children at circle time, read books to them, made creatures with green Play Doh, and took notes of such novelties to Israel as toys with mirrors in them.
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