CollectionsSocial Work
IN THE NEWS

Social Work

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rendell administration's move to privatize social-work services for homeless shelters last year stumbled badly, leaving work on many cases undone for months and causing city officials to revamp the program for the current fiscal year. City social workers had to work overtime this summer to get paperwork on neglected cases caught up, city union leaders said. "It did not work as well as we had hoped," city homeless czar Bill Parshall conceded. But Parshall said many of the problems have been corrected in a revised plan that includes both city workers and private contractors.
NEWS
April 28, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Margaret Yeakel, 89, of Havertown, a retired professor of social work at West Chester University who taught social workers in Hungary and fought for rights for the elderly in Pennsylvania, died April 17 at home of complications from hip surgery. Dr. Yeakel joined the faculty of West Chester University in the 1970s and helped develop the bachelor of arts degree in social work. She previously was director of social service at McGee Rehabilitation Hospital for several years. She and her longtime companion, Grace Ganter, a professor of social work at Temple University, cowrote Retrieval From Limbo in 1967, a book about treatment of troubled children.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanne Cwiklinski Slivka, 87, retired director of social service at the former Philadelphia State Hospital at Byberry, died Friday of lung cancer at her Trevose home. Mrs. Slivka went to work at the hospital, for many years Pennsylvania's largest psychiatric institution, in 1943 after the death of her husband, Witold "Victor" Slivka. She started as a secretary and interpreter. Within two years, she was a senior caseworker. Mrs. Slivka went on to obtain a master's degree in social work from the University of Pennsylvania in 1951.
NEWS
May 10, 2003 | By DANIEL PIPES
WHEN BILL Clinton deployed U.S. troops in Bosnia and Haiti, he was criticized for turning foreign policy into "social work. " By what authority, many asked, did the president put troops in harm's way without discernible American interests at stake? George W. Bush has made sure not to repeat this error. He deployed force twice - in Afghanistan and Iraq - and both times he made a convincing case for U.S. security requiring the elimination of the enemy regimes. But many are judging the hostilities in those two countries less in terms of what they do for Americans than how they affect the other side.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Lambert Fosnocht, 77, a former director of social workers in Chester County, died Tuesday, Oct. 9, of cancer at her home in Hershey's Mill, the retirement community near West Chester. Mrs. Fosnocht was clinical director of outpatient services at Community Services for Human Growth in Paoli, in charge of 22 social workers from 1982 to 1993, her husband, Thomas, said. The firm's clients "could have been abused, could be divorced, lost their jobs, emotionally disturbed for any number of reasons," Thomas Fosnocht said.
NEWS
November 20, 1995 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Grace Rosetta Nash was a quiet woman who didn't like anyone making a fuss over her. But the social worker was forceful when it came to looking out for the children and teens she came across in Family Court. "She didn't believe in such a thing as a bad seed," said her niece, Emma Lake ErieNash. "She never saw them as being delinquents. She believed you had to look into their circumstances. " Grace Nash was such an unassuming woman that she told her niece not to bother with a funeral for her. She made up her mind back in 1976 that she was going to donate her body to science.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Kaye spent eight years as a fashion model, traveling the world, earning thousands of dollars and sporting flashy new clothes in the pages of Harper's Bazaar, Mademoiselle and other magazines. It was a lifestyle that most people only dream about. But as her career advanced, Kaye found a growing tension between her self- image and industry expectations. The fast-paced world of New York fashion is, first and foremost, a business, one where the models are little more than commodities, she said.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony F. Bruno, 69, of Glenside, a professor of social sciences at Community College of Philadelphia and a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania, died Tuesday, Feb. 19, of cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Though his area of expertise was social work, Mr. Bruno "really was an educator. That's how he promoted himself and that's how he lived his life," said his wife, Joanne. "He was not a clinician. " Mr. Bruno, a professor at CCP since the 1970s, "specialized in teaching criminal justice courses from a social-work perspective," his wife said.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HOWARD ARNOLD might have trod the hallowed halls of the University of Pennsylvania as a teacher and administrator for 31 years, but his consciousness of the plight of suffering people was always at street level. He knew about the ravages of poverty, ignorance and violence, especially in the African-American community because his hands were always in it, trying to make it better. As a social worker, Howard Arnold was possessed of a natural gift for identifying with people on the short end of society, and a talent for helping them rise above their situations.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ann B. Hubben had always wanted to go further in her education. Hubben, a caseworker who handles foster care and adoption services for Delaware County's Children and Youth Services, said she'd found it difficult financially to return to college and had not held out hope of getting her master's degree. But Hubben and seven other CYS employees were all grins Friday at a luncheon in their honor, having fulfilled their wish in obtaining a master's degree in social work. And they had the county to thank for their advanced education.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
A new racial gap has emerged on college campuses: Too few African American students are enrolling in majors that lead to high-paying jobs. Instead of pursuing science, business, and engineering, the students are studying education and social work, according to a recent analysis of data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau. College administrators and students in interviews recognized the divide and its implications for socio-economic mobility and pay equity. "While they're in the right church, they're kind of in the wrong pews," said Anthony P. Carnevale, the director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce and lead author on the report, "African Americans: College Majors and Earnings," which was released last week.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unis Uthedra Francis, 82, of Southwest Philadelphia, a Jamaican émigré whose belief in hard work and education fueled a rise from nurse's aide to social worker, died at home Saturday, Nov. 14. "My mother was determined," daughter Elaine Hansom said. "She was just really a hardworking woman. " Born in Watermount, Jamaica, Mrs. Francis was the third child of Altimont George and Emeriah Whyte. The Whytes instilled in their daughter bedrock values - faith in God, service to community, and love of family - but above all were hard work and the importance of education.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Mary Peter Kerner, 79, a teacher and social worker who found ways to help those living on society's fringes, died Saturday, Oct. 31, of a stroke at Assisi House in Aston. She had been a member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia for 58 years. Born Frances Victoria Kerner in Philadelphia, she graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls High School. Sister Mary Peter earned a bachelor's degree in English from Neumann University in 1970 and a master's degree in social work from the Catholic University of America in Washington in 1976.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Crystal Allen was 6 when a Glassboro shelter for domestic violence survivors became her home. Her mother, Laura, a drug addict married to a drug addict, needed a safe place to live with her three young daughters. Crystal Allen doesn't remember much about those dark times in 1989, but she hasn't forgotten the refuge the shelter offered her family. And after their mother died in 2010, Allen and her sisters found a way to honor her memory while helping other domestic abuse survivors, too. Their nonprofit, all-volunteer organization, Mom's Pajamas, accepts donations of brand-new packaged pajamas for women, and distributes them to the Glassboro shelter and two similar facilities in Camden and Cumberland Counties.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT'S INTERESTING how little things can stick in your memory. Like Jim McLaughlin's No. 44. It was the number he wore when he played wide receiver on the football team of St. Francis of Assisi Parochial School in Springfield, Delaware County, back in the '50s. "It was a number he always remembered," his family said. Which might seem curious, because Jim McLaughlin went on to more athletic achievements, success in business and many charitable activities. But, apparently, in his mind he would always be No. 44. James J. McLaughlin Jr., a health-care marketer, founder of a health-care consulting business, an active alumnus of St. Joseph's University, an Air Force veteran and a devoted family man, died Friday at age 67 after a courageous battle with brain cancer.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second of two parts   'We have to support the people in Ferguson," said Kashara White, 22. "We can't let them be shot by rubber bullets while we sit here twiddling our thumbs worrying about who got shot next. We have to put our bodies on the line. " White was standing in the streets of Philadelphia on Nov. 25, the day after a grand jury decided not to indict police officer Darren Wilson, who on Aug. 9 fatally shot Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. White took part in a peaceful demonstration in Philadelphia, one organized largely via social media.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
First of two parts 'Nothing should be normal or everyday about accepting all this," says Ferguson, Mo., Democratic committeewoman Patricia Bynes. "Social media has helped ensure the images and agony stay fresh in people's minds. " Ferguson stays fresh. On Sunday, members of the St. Louis Rams did a pregame salute in protest of what they saw as police violence in the fatal Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown. That angered the St. Louis Police Association, which called on the National Football League to punish the players.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN the '60s, college students who saw the need for change at their institutions didn't file petitions or write letters. They demonstrated. Temple University wasn't immune. In 1969, students staged a sit-in in the office of president Paul Anderson to demand the admission of more African-American and Latino students, then a tiny minority of the school's student body. Anderson agreed to the demands and looked around the campus for someone who had the interest and the leadership qualities to lead a recruitment program.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
MECHANICSVILLE, Va. - It was only July, but Martha Trinca was thinking about Christmas. This year was going to be special. Her older sister Theresa was coming. Among the 10 Hunt children, Theresa stood out. The fiercely independent redhead had left the family farm, put herself through college, and reinvented herself as a social worker in Philadelphia. So on July 24, Trinca sat at her home outside Richmond, scribbling a list of possible Christmas presents. Hunt, 53, did not have many needs.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elaine M. Brody, a pioneer in social work and gerontology whose career influenced policy and services for seniors and their families, died Wednesday, July 9, of respiratory failure at her home in San Mateo, Calif. According to her own academic definition, the former Philadelphian was "very, very old" at 91 years of age. Mrs. Brody's groundbreaking research on older adults and their caretakers contributed to the birth of gerontology. Her work continues to serve as a foundation for research in the field.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|