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BUSINESS
November 20, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cathryn Coate most certainly is not a cheerleader for the commercial real estate business, describing it as "very competitive, very cutthroat, real nasty. " Her initial impressions of the industry's brokers? "Sort of an oily salesman," was one way she put it in an interview last week. Another was: "Manipulative. " So it was a stunner to many who knew her when Coate became a commercial real estate broker 14 years ago. "I don't think anyone could have imagined this is what she would do," said Diane Dalto, a consultant to the arts community, which Coate was influential in getting Ed Rendell to embrace when he was mayor.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The typical day at Camp Sequoia on the Hill School campus in Pottstown is notable for what is absent. There are no TVs or video games that lead some children to huddle by themselves in corners. There are no cellphones or laptops to take them away from their peers. Instead, the children are attending the experimental overnight camp to learn confidence and to improve their social skills - all in an atmosphere of summer fun. "It's good for campers who need help with building independence or [overcoming]
NEWS
March 5, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schelysture "Shelli" Gordon McWhorter, 73, a retired Temple University professor, died of a heart attack Tuesday, March 1, at Arbor Terrace in Chestnut Hill. Dr. McWhorter earned a bachelor's degree from Fisk University in Nashville and a master's degree in social work from Atlanta University. In the early 1960s, she was a social worker at the Lutheran Settlement House in Philadelphia. Later, she was an instructor in the School of Social Work at Temple University, and became a full professor after earning a doctorate in early childhood development from Temple.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Elizabeth "Betty" Randolph Jones, 92, of Mount Airy, a retired social-service coordinator, died of heart failure Wednesday, Feb. 16, at Chestnut Hill Hospital. A native of the East Bronx in New York City, Mrs. Jones earned a bachelor's degree from New York University and a master's degree in social work from Atlanta University. While in Atlanta, she met Sercy L. Jones, a divinity student. They married in 1943. For the next 24 years, she was a supportive pastor's wife as he ministered in churches in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland.
NEWS
June 14, 2010
Albert E. Wilkerson of Fairmount, a professor emeritus at Temple University, died of heart failure at the Visiting Nurses Association Hospice in Philadelphia on Monday, June 7, a day after his 82d birthday. Dr. Wilkerson retired in the mid-1990s after 25 years as a professor of social work at Temple. For 10 years he was associate dean of Temple's School of Social Work. He also taught graduate students at the University of Pennsylvania. He was the author of The Rights of Children: Emergent Concepts in Law and Society . A native of Durham, N.C., Dr. Wilkerson earned a bachelor's degree from Duke University and a bachelor's degree in divinity from the former Crozer Theological Seminary.
NEWS
June 9, 2010
RE FRANCIS Palmer's May 22 letter taking aim at a previous letter of mine: Socialism isn't about handouts. The working class creates nearly all the value in America. But since we are a capitalist society, most of the value generated by our hard work is taken by a tiny minority of wealthy owners in the form of profit. This is plain to see when we observe a corporation pulling in billions in profits while so many hardworking people struggle to get by on $9-$10 an hour. I envision a society where workers, the vast majority of Americans, can work hard and live comfortably.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joining "fellow members of the proud parents club," Vice President Biden told 150 graduates of the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice Monday night that each can serve as a beacon of optimism in difficult times. "The thing that I love about you all . . . is that you believe in possibilities, the possibility that you can make things better," he said. He called that belief the "fuel" that has ignited social change. Biden's daughter Ashley Biden, 28, received a kiss on the cheek from her father when she went onstage at Irvine Auditorium to accept her master's degree in social work.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joining "fellow members of the proud parents club," Vice President Biden told 150 graduates of the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice Monday night that each can serve as a beacon of optimism in difficult times. "The thing that I love about you all . . . is that you believe in possibilities, the possibility that you can make things better," he said. He called that belief the "fuel" that has ignited social change. Biden's daughter Ashley Biden, 28, received a kiss on the cheek from her father when she went onstage at Irvine Auditorium to accept her master's degree in social work.
NEWS
May 6, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teresa Ann Hagan, 62, a former teacher at Thomas Jefferson University and Hahnemann University, died of breast cancer Saturday, April 24, at her home in Schwenksville. Dr. Hagan "did research on substance abuse in pregnant women and their children" while directing a methadone program at the Family Center at Jefferson University from 1990 to 1993, said her partner, Kathleen Meyers. Dr. Hagan was also an adjunct instructor in Jefferson's College of Allied Health Sciences from 1992 to 1997 and an associate professor in Hahnemann's graduate programs in couples and family therapy from 1999 to 2001.
NEWS
October 17, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
To her friends, she was the one who made them laugh and feel special. To her chemistry professor at West Chester University, she was the well-prepared junior from Philadelphia who, in class three nights ago, "was really engaged and following this discussion of how nanoparticles grow into raindrops. " And now, to Philadelphia police, Selene K. Raynor, 21, is the 241st homicide of the year, a victim of a boyfriend with a troubled past and a semiautomatic pistol. Raynor was pregnant.
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