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Social Work

NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Lambert Fosnocht, 77, a former director of social workers in Chester County, died Tuesday, Oct. 9, of cancer at her home in Hershey's Mill, the retirement community near West Chester. Mrs. Fosnocht was clinical director of outpatient services at Community Services for Human Growth in Paoli, in charge of 22 social workers from 1982 to 1993, her husband, Thomas, said. The firm's clients "could have been abused, could be divorced, lost their jobs, emotionally disturbed for any number of reasons," Thomas Fosnocht said.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
John F. Connors III, 85, of Merion, a sociology professor at La Salle University for 55 years, died Thursday, Oct. 4, at home of an apparent asthma attack. Mr. Connors began teaching sociology at La Salle in 1955 and was described by his colleagues as a good professor who demanded the most of his students. "There was always a group of students waiting outside of his office for help," said Finn Hornum, who chaired the department of sociology, social work, and criminal justice for a time while Mr. Connors taught at La Salle.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
RAMONA KATHERINE Jonas was the ideal aunt. Every holiday she would show up at the homes of her numerous nieces and nephews with bags of presents. She gave one nephew a car when he started college. And she was always there cheering them on when they played sports. As a fine athlete in her youth, she also acted as an unofficial coach, especially in tennis, to help her nieces and nephews excel at their games. Ramona Jonas, a Native American and member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe in Massachusetts and a retired program specialist at the Elwyn Institute in Delaware County, died Monday.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seymour F. Kornblum, 93, who retired in 1987 after 20 years as director of the senior adult department for the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Philadelphia, died Tuesday, Aug. 21, of arteriosclerotic vascular disease at the Quadrangle, the retirement community in Haverford. In 2000, Presbyterian Senior Services presented Dr. Kornblum with its Maggie Kuhn Award, named for the Philadelphia resident who founded the Gray Panthers organization. He manifested his social conscience decades earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Laura Beitman Hoover, For The Inquirer
Debi Seltzer has always believed in reinvention. Growing up around her family's auction business, the Doylestown resident was constantly exposed to objects, sometimes eclectic, always personal, and usually affordable - even during a childhood that didn't include much money. "The fact you could walk into a room, and see everything from a little doll to family pictures to jewelry, it was fascinating," she said. "I just remember loving everything about it. " Seltzer, 39, the owner of Vintage Doylestown, is not only taking a turn giving earrings, clothing, and toy cars a second act, but after four years as a small-business owner, she's appreciating her own comeback as well.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
STEPHANIE Kacur was a teenager in Uniontown, Pa., when she was first exposed to Philadelphia — by watching "American Bandstand. " Seeing the happy teens dancing on Dick Clark's iconic TV show might not have presented a complete picture of the city, but it was enough to stir Stephanie's imagination. And she decided she wanted to live here one day. She got her wish after graduating from Penn State. Her parents gave her $100, and she arrived in the city in 1971. She got a job with the Children's Aid Society, launching a career in social work that extended almost 40 years.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Max Silverstein, 100, of Center City, a faculty member from 1966 to 1977 at what is now the School of Social Policy and Practice at the University of Pennsylvania, died of cerebrovascular disease Thursday, May 3, at his home. After retiring from Penn, he was chairman of the Mayor's Public-Private Task Force on Homelessness for Mayor W. Wilson Goode in the late 1980s. A task force committee estimated in 1987 that between 900 and 1,500 of the city's 10,000 homeless people were mentally ill, and that the system for dealing with them was in disarray.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
JoAnn Splon Downes, 81, of Center City, a social worker who was one of the pioneers of hospital-affiliated hospice care in Philadelphia, died of Parkinson's disease on Easter, April 8, at home. "She was comforted by the presence and spirit of family gathered for the holiday," her children wrote in a tribute to their mother. In 1978, Mrs. Downes had been a social worker in Philadelphia for two decades when she was asked by a friend, Dr. Jeffrey Hartzell, to be administrator for a new program he was establishing at Pennsylvania Hospital - the first hospital-based hospice service in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2012 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In September 2009, the dating site eHarmony told Lisa and Ray that they might make a good pair. Looking at his profile, Lisa saw that Ray "was passionate about making a difference in the world, and I was intrigued by that. " Ray, who grew up in Cherry Hill, had moved to Camden to try to help revitalize that city. He is CEO of the nonprofit Latin American Economic Development Association, which helps to start and grow small businesses. Lisa, who lived in the Art Museum neighborhood, sent him a message through the eHarmony site.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cathryn Coate most certainly is not a cheerleader for the commercial real estate business, describing it as "very competitive, very cutthroat, real nasty. " Her initial impressions of the industry's brokers? "Sort of an oily salesman," was one way she put it in an interview last week. Another was: "Manipulative. " So it was a stunner to many who knew her when Coate became a commercial real estate broker 14 years ago. "I don't think anyone could have imagined this is what she would do," said Diane Dalto, a consultant to the arts community, which Coate was influential in getting Ed Rendell to embrace when he was mayor.
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