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NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Michael A. MacDowell It's debatable whether it was Einstein, Ben Franklin, Mark Twain, or none of them who said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome. What isn't debatable is the validity of the statement. Individuals, institutions, and countries should learn from past mistakes, but they don't. Take Venezuela. When Hugo Chávez, the self-styled democratic socialist, was elected president of Venezuela in 1999, the country was wealthy, possessing immense proven oil reserves.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | E.J. Dionne
There is an irony to the presidential candidacy of Bernie Sanders: The senator from Vermont is often cast as exotic because he calls himself a "democratic socialist. " Yet the most important issue in politics throughout the Western democracies is whether the economic and social world that social democrats built can survive the coming decades. Let's deal first with the tyranny of labels. Socialist has long been an unacceptable word in the United States, yet our country once had a vibrant socialist movement whose history has been well recounted by John Nichols and James Weinstein.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
When socialism is invoked in American political discourse, it's usually derisively. Prior to this election cycle, there hasn't been a self-described socialist with even remotely respectable polls in a presidential campaign since Eugene V. Debs. Since then, the term has been used mostly by conservatives as a slur or in poorly formulated broadsides equating America's public sector with the Gulag. But this year, the protest candidacy of democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is outperforming all expectations - he effectively tied Hillary Clinton in the Iowa caucuses last week and is favored to win Tuesday's New Hampshire primary - threatening to restore legitimacy to the term.
NEWS
June 20, 1996 | BY GEORGE F. WILL
The palatable result of Russia's presidential voting is that Boris Yeltsin ran slightly ahead of his principal rival, Gennady Zyuganov, a Communist, in the first round of a contest that will be settled in a runoff next month. The depressing news is that Yeltsin, assisted by foreign governments, his government and Russia's media, ran only slightly 3 percentage points ahead of the candidate promising "communism as the historic future of mankind. " Actually, some people worry that there could be a Pinochet in Russia's future.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
The Committee for the Free World, the most spirited anti-communist voice in post-Vietnam America, closed shop this week. "We've won, goodbye," explained founder Midge Decter. The most skeptical coroner has spoken. Communism is dead. Another story, however, has been largely missed: Socialism is dead too. At a recent gathering of the left (for a memorial tribute to radical historian William Appleman Williams), fellow historian Christopher Lasch, with admirable candor, said this: "We have to ask ourselves whether (Gorbachev)
NEWS
December 1, 2010
I'M SURE letter-writer Pat Dougherty believes Fox News is fair and unbiased. and that's what she wants from everyone else. Tea partiers believe everyone is wrong unless you agree with them. America rejected communism and Marxism about 50 years ago. Check your history books. As for rejecting socialism, you can state that when America rejects Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. I doubt that's going to happen anytime soon. I'm guessing your problem with Massachusetts and Nevada has to do with the Democrats still in office.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | BY MILTON FRIEDMAN, From the New York Times
Conventional wisdom these days can be summarized in the form of a syllogism. Major premise: Socialism is a failure. Even lifelong Communists now accept this proposition. Wherever socialism has been tried, it has proved unable to deliver the goods, either in the material form of a high standard of living or in the immaterial form of human freedom. Minor premise: Capitalism is a success. Economies that have used capitalism - free private markets - as their principal means of organizing economic activity have proved capable of combining widely shared prosperity and a high measure of human freedom.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | By FRANZ SCHURMANN
On Aug. 2, a communist youth newspaper in Moscow featured a cartoon on its front page showing a man in a straitjacket being carried away to a mental institution. He was screaming, "We shall live under communism. " Well before its final collapse, most Soviet citizens knew that communism, once their powerful religion-like faith, was dead. Many communists continue to hold power both in the Soviet Union and elsewhere. But those who support them do so largely because they oppose radical economic privatization, which could cost them their jobs.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By CHRISTINE O'DONNELL
MY JAW dropped at what I heard coming from the TV screen. Did he really just say that on national TV? I was watching a panel discussion on the health-care bill. The General Motors fiasco was cited as evidence of what happens when the government dabbles in the private sector. A gentleman defending the Obama bill countered by saying the problem with GM was that the government owned only 80 percent of GM - rather than all of it. I sat there stunned for a second, amazed by what he'd just admitted on national TV. Good, I thought, the socialist agenda is coming out of the closet.
NEWS
May 15, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
When Soviet media pundit Vladimir Pozner talks, as he did to an international conference of pension-fund managers here, he often throws his listeners off balance. Years of living in New York blessed - or cursed - him with an accent so flawlessly American that he might well be a drive- time radio personality. What was even more startling to his corporate audience, however, was what he was saying: In so many words, Pozner was acknowledging that seven decades of Soviet history has been based on lies.
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NEWS
August 19, 2016
ISSUE | SOCIAL SECURITY Drop income cap It seems not many people want to talk about the easiest way to fix Social Security and make it more stable, equitable, and fair ("Seeking an SS fix," Sunday). That would be to simply remove the income cap, also known as the wage base limit. That is the maximum wage subject to the Social Security tax for the year. For earnings this year, the base is $118,500. Without the cap, individuals would start paying Social Security taxes on income above the base.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, STAFF WRITER
Ten teens walk into a room. They're captives to a high school lockdown, but no one knows the reason. "Drugs," one suggests. "No, the dogs would have already sniffed out something suspicious if it was only a locker search," says another - "must be a bomb threat. Or maybe a suicide?" As speculations spread through word of mouth and hashtags, topics trend that leave some students pondering gossip's real-world implications, whether perpetuated in-person or over social media. Such is the plot of The Time We Give Each Other , a new play penned by 14 middle-school and high-school students that premiered at two public readings on Friday.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Would raising the Social Security age fix the system? Not in an equitable manner, says Gary Burtless, a senior fellow at Brookings Institution, armed with data showing that lower-income folks tend not to live as long, and thus do not collect as much from Social Security. In fact, Social Security favors the "One Percent," who have more income and better health care. As a result, high-income Americans live longer and thus reap more benefits from Social Security. Full benefits begin at 65 or 66 for those born between 1943 and 1954.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Penn National Gaming Inc. bought Rocket Games Inc., a San Franciso developer of social casino games, for $60 million in cash, plus potential incentive payments to certain Rocket executives over the next two years, the Wyomissing, Pa., casino operator said Wednesday. Among Rocket's 50 social casino games is Viva Slots Vegas, which has an audience of more than 200,000 daily players, according to Penn National, whose Penn Interactive Ventures is based in Conshohocken and operates www.hollywoodcasino.com , HollywoodSlots.com, and Hollywoodraces.com.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Michael A. MacDowell It's debatable whether it was Einstein, Ben Franklin, Mark Twain, or none of them who said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome. What isn't debatable is the validity of the statement. Individuals, institutions, and countries should learn from past mistakes, but they don't. Take Venezuela. When Hugo Chávez, the self-styled democratic socialist, was elected president of Venezuela in 1999, the country was wealthy, possessing immense proven oil reserves.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
In 2010's Catfish , Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman showed a rare intelligence about how social media gives people the illusion of intimacy while actually alienating us from one another. It was messy and ambiguous - like life. With Nerve , they repackage the same insights in a romantic thriller. It's slick and audience-friendly, like the Hollywood fantasy it sets out to be. Adapted from Jeanne Ryan's young adult novel, the film stars Emma Roberts ( Scream Queens ) as Vee, a studious, cautious high school senior from Staten Island whose one act of defiance enmeshes her in a dangerous contest cooked up on a social-media forum.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
BOTH PRESIDENTIAL candidates will take the stage in the next two weeks to try to sell us on the idea they can lead our nation. One way to demonstrate they have what it takes to be president is to tell voters how they'll keep Social Security strong for our kids and grandkids. If our nation's leaders don't act, future retirees could lose up to $10,000 a year in benefits. With a volatile stock market and fewer jobs offering pensions, today's workers and future generations will likely have an even greater need for Social Security.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
WHOEVER THOUGHT that urban farming was a way to demonstrate that black lives matter - just as much as everyone else's? The youth who started Life Do Grow Farm in North Philadelphia thought so. They say "the farm," as they call it, is about more than just growing food. It's about community building and changing the neighborhood surrounding the farm on 11th Street near Dakota, a few blocks north of Temple University. "Going to these protests [such as for Black Lives Matter]
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
A Social Security office on South Broad Street close to the Wells Fargo Center will be closed during the Democratic National Convention, though other nearby businesses say they plan to remain open. Social Security officials said the office at 3336 S. Broad St. will be closed from July 25 to 28 because of the expected DNC-related road closures and heavy traffic. The office will reopen at 9 a.m. July 29. "The street closures and rerouted traffic will make it difficult for our employees as well as the public to access the office," District Manager Joan Permar said in a statement.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
Back in 1965, when now-U.S. Rep. John Lewis led hundreds of protesters across the Edmund Pettus Bridge from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., members of African Methodist Episcopal churches were among them. A half-century later, after two black men died at the hands of police last week in Louisiana and Minnesota, A.M.E. Church members from around the world took to the streets of Center City in protest. They were among about 30,000 A.M.E. members in the city for the denomination's quadrennial conference, which ends Wednesday at the Convention Center.
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