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NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo was the most important word. Whenever it was uttered, the people spoke quietly and bowed their heads. "Moo means peace in our society," said Emily Bosk, 14. "It's very important to our people. " Bosk and some of her classmates at the Friends Central School created a city-state, with its own language, as part of a nine-day interdisciplinary project involving English, social studies, science, math and other subjects. "We're trying to get kids to see their learning is not in little compartments," said Mark Fifer, one of the teachers.
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SPORTS
February 1, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - The two most recent coaches of the New England Patriots looked very relaxed, quite happy to spend a half-hour or so in each other's company yesterday morning. They turned the annual Friday Super Bowl coaches' joint news conference into a talk-show chat, hosted by affable, telegenic Pete Carroll, with Bill Belichick as the eager guest who has a movie, book or show to plug. In this case, the show airs tomorrow evening at 6:30, when Super Bowl XLIX kicks off. The quest of Belichick and the Patriots to rise above "Spygate" and "Deflategate" for the fourth championship of the Belichick-Tom Brady era runs head on into the quest of Carroll and the Seattle Seahawks to become the first repeat champions in 10 years, and vanquish any doubts about their dominance of the league at mid-decade.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the grass needed cutting and money was running out, he brought in his lawn mower and took care of the grounds himself. When funds were unavailable for salaries, he didn't take a paycheck, so he could pay his small staff. And when the heat failed last winter and leaks sprouted from water pipes, he fought for quick repairs - a frustrating process still underway. Clearly, Jason Allen had his share of challenges as the first African American executive director of the Camden County Historical Society.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Bible Society will give up its tony Broadway address for one in Philadelphia's historic district. The society, which has had its headquarters in New York City for 199 years and has operations all over the world, will relocate to 401 Market St., steps from Independence Mall. Mayor Nutter will announce the nonprofit's move, which will bring more than 200 jobs to the city, at a news conference Wednesday. The society's primary mission is to engage more people with the Bible.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
When George Zhu attended Mercersburg Academy, a boarding school in central Pennsylvania, he was always told to finish his plate at dinner. The law required cafeteria workers to dump whatever prepared food was not consumed or never served. That wastefulness bothered Zhu, now a sophomore at Swarthmore College. So he spent an almost sleepless weekend in a building at Haverford College with his team of three friends - surrounded by pizza boxes and dozens of other ambitious students - searching for a solution through technology.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
All that Grace Chang Venner wanted was to bounce her husband's presumed mistress from the Society Hill apartment he had agreed to lease to her for $1 per month for the next 40 years, and she wanted to do it with as little fuss as possible. But all that failed when rather than doing it in person, she sued him in Common Pleas Court, plunging her and Stuart Venner, 62, a Brooklyn, N.Y., real estate mogul, and Panadda Pratomtang, 41, into the media spotlight for two long days. The saga began in July 2012, when Stuart Venner bought 421 Pine St., a three-story brownstone, for $900,000 as an investment property.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama and Vice President Biden are expected in Philadelphia next week, where they are scheduled to speak at the House Democrats' policy retreat in Society Hill. The two-day gathering will bring the entire caucus to the city for two days of huddling about their strategy for the next two years. Obama will speak next Thursday and Biden the following day, the White House said. Politico first reported their plans. Local congressmen hope the event will also give them a chance to show off the city as Philadelphia pushes to host the 2016 Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IT TURNS OUT when you rent a ritzy Society Hill condo to your mistress and let her pay for it with sex - as a lawsuit alleges a high-powered Brooklyn real-estate mogul did - you probably shouldn't list your wife as a property manager. But Stuart Venner, according to a civil lawsuit filed by his wife on Friday in Philadelphia, may have made that mistake. In the suit, Grace Chang Venner alleges that her husband, a Brooklyn developer, drew up a 40-year lease last January for another woman to live in a stately, three-story brick rowhouse he bought in 2012 on Pine Street near 5th. But this wasn't just any lease, the suit claims: The agreement allegedly allowed defendant Panadda Pratomtang to rent the property for $1 a month until 2053 "in return for her providing prostitution services to Board Member, [Stuart]
REAL_ESTATE
January 18, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
From the moment the elevator doors open in Alfred "Fred" Hagen's ultrachic penthouse, the swooning begins. The unit, spanning the top two floors of a trendy 12-story boutique building in Society Hill, is the pinnacle of stylish city living. Floor-to-ceiling windows stretch across the 4,000-square-foot residence, where breathtaking views pan from the city's corporate center to the stadium complex to the Delaware River, where the Ben Franklin Bridge arcs in the wake of cruising cargo ships.
NEWS
December 22, 2014
ISSUE | HOME TEAM Christie's playing wrong side of field Gov. Christie cannot be elected president, and it isn't because he could not win a Republican nomination battle fought largely on the right. Christie has doomed himself in a general election because no politician whose base of support is in the Northeast could afford to lose Pennsylvania, and no one can win Pennsylvania without faring well in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, where the bulk of the state's voters live.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - When Gov.-elect Tom Wolf heads to New York City on Friday for the annual wining, dining, and networking extravaganza known as the Pennsylvania Society, he will be the man saying No-Thank-You in the land of Thank-You-Very-Much. With many high-profile staff and cabinet positions yet to fill, Wolf will be a main attraction as he joins scores of officials, lobbyists, and political strategists at cocktail receptions and parties hosted by the well-heeled and well-connected.
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