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NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo was the most important word. Whenever it was uttered, the people spoke quietly and bowed their heads. "Moo means peace in our society," said Emily Bosk, 14. "It's very important to our people. " Bosk and some of her classmates at the Friends Central School created a city-state, with its own language, as part of a nine-day interdisciplinary project involving English, social studies, science, math and other subjects. "We're trying to get kids to see their learning is not in little compartments," said Mark Fifer, one of the teachers.
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NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert D. Lukens, 42, of West Chester, president of the Chester County Historical Society and a distant relative of the 19th century iron-mill owner Charles Lukens, died Sunday, Aug. 2, of cancer at his home. Mr. Lukens was a graduate of Delaware County Christian School, and received his bachelor's degree and doctorate in history from Temple University. He also held a master's degree from the University of Tennessee, in American history. Mr. Lukens began his work with the historical society in 1993 as a museum volunteer while an undergraduate.
NEWS
July 28, 2015
RONNIE POLANECZKY reminded us about the necessity of "inclusion" for everyone. The "down-side" of the Americans with Disabilities Act with intended enforcement in a society, which should automatically grant equality, is that no amount of legislation will change people's bad attitudes, nor overcome greed, ignorance or lack of common sense. For a supposedly civilized democracy, the United States can be excruciatingly barbaric. Sometimes, having too much privilege - being able to buy whatever people want instead of having to make judicious decisions to meet people's needs within what society has - is a "Macbeth" recipe for denying civil rights: double, double, toil and trouble; fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Communiy development and independent cinema combine in Movies on the Block, a series of free outdoor screenings sponsored by the Philadelphia Film Society and backed by local foundation Fierce Advocacy Fund. PFS established Movies on the Block to increase access to films across the city, adapting existing urban spaces to meet the needs of areas with "chronic concerns," such as gun violence and health issues such as obesity and diabetes. "When movie houses started, it was always a community gathering place," said Allison Koehler, education and programs director at PFS. Now, "a lot of us feel that going to the movies is an individual experience, and we want to bring back movie-going as a gathering place.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year and a half ago, most of the Camden County Historical Society's three-building complex was closed by water damage, the result of broken pipes during a severe winter cold snap. Leaks sprouted in the Camden County Museum, then in the Charles S. Boyer Building, where the Richard Hineline Library and administrative offices are located; and later in Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house. But the setback didn't stop the institution from hosting visitors and researchers even as repairs got underway and plans were made for the future - now with help from the Nonprofit Center at La Salle University in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Christine Flowers
WHEN I WAS 11, the Supreme Court legalized abortion. It jumped into the social battles that had been waging across the country at a slow boil, snatched a constitutional right from the penumbral shadows and gave dignity to the coat hanger. After all, it was this bloody symbol that had been raised to prove that women needed abortions, and when they couldn't get them they'd resort to fatal home remedies. And voila , the issue was finally laid to rest. Now let me dislodge my tongue from my cheek.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
That composer Michael Djupstrom won the 2012 International Delius Society competition speaks well for the ears of the British judges charged with choosing a work that might be programmed with chamber music by Frederick Delius. Walimai was the boldly contrasting focus Sunday at the Pennsylvania German Society when Djupstrom and violist Ayane Kozasa surrounded his piece with gentler works by Delius, Rebecca Clarke, and Frank Bridge. These two young artists accommodated such contrasting scores, finding the right voice for transcriptions of Delius's Violin Sonatas Nos. 2 and 3 and Bridge's Two Pieces , before crossing time barriers to find compelling rhythmic adventure and virtuosic flights for both instruments in Djupstrom's dramatic narrative.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sister Mary Theodosia Linus, 98, an elementary school teacher and librarian who served at Catholic schools here and elsewhere, died Sunday, May 3, of cancer at Holy Child Center in Rosemont. She was a sister of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus for 78 years. Born in Philadelphia, Sister Theodosia was one of five children of James and Margaret Ahern Linus. Her family was large and fun-loving. Sister Theo, as she was called, inherited a bright, happy spirit that she carried with her wherever she went, her family said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine being given another human being as your 11th birthday present, as happens to Sarah, the heroine of Sue Monk Kidd's 2014 best-seller, The Invention of Wings . Kidd's fact-based story is about the lives of famed early 19th-century Quaker abolitionist Sarah Grimké and the person she was gifted, her maidservant Handful, an 11-year-old born into slavery. The novel vividly brings to life an era when such an event seemed normal; when slavery was considered natural, even righteous.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Seffrin, 70, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society, will retire next Friday after 40 years with the venerable nonprofit cancer-fighting organization, including 23 at the helm. In an interview this week, he talked about some of the 102-year-old society's accomplishments under his leadership, financial issues, and his plans.   Progress against cancer In 2009, the society (ACS) trademarked the slogan "Official sponsor of birthdays" to highlight that its work to prevent cancer, detect it early, and improve treatment helps people live longer.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police say they are searching for two men who robbed a Society Hill man with what appeared to be an AK-47 rifle outside his house earlier this month. The victim, 52, was getting out of his car on the 300 block of Fifth Street about 2:40 a.m. April 10, after arriving home from a club. That's when he was approached by two men from behind, police said. One was carrying what looked like an AK-47, police said. The men grabbed his wallet and iPhone and then fled in a white SUV. Police said they obtained surveillance footage from the unnamed club that showed the suspects inside, and, later, their SUV, following the victim.
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