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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 10, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
HE WAS Martin Luther King one day, Malcolm X another, Jackie Robinson the day after that. Nearly 100 years before each man carved his indelible mark on the tree of American history, Octavius V. Catto hacked away at it, as well, blazing a zealot's trail amid the dangerously racist backdrop of post-Civil War Philadelphia. His assassination at age 32, on the day his exhaustive voting rights efforts flipped the city's corrupt political system upside down, only emphasized the messianic impact he had on his people and his times.
REAL_ESTATE
May 12, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
One thing was clear: Keri White was ready for city life along the Northeast corridor. She was definitely not keen on moving to Arkansas, where her husband's early roots were. And after his days in law school and hers as an undergraduate at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, where they met, both were ready for a change. "So we considered several cities and decided on Philadelphia, although neither of us even knew the city," said Matt White, who began applying for jobs with law firms here.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY CHRIS RABB
RECASTING the overarching narrative that - outside of sports and music - black men and boys are assets vs. a drain on society is a radical one, based on invisible truths that are no less real. This is the apparent goal of the White House's recent My Brother's Keeper initiative. However, there is another challenging truth that makes this bold civic strategy more complex: The reason African-Americans are in this country at all is because our black ancestors were also highly valuable assets, literally.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he came to work in January, Jason Allen got a chilly reception. A boiler pump providing heat for the Camden County Historical Society building complex in Camden had broken down during the holiday break as outside temperatures plummeted to single digits. Allen, the society's executive director, quickly called in a contractor, who restored the heat but unintentionally set in motion an even bigger problem that will end up costing about $100,000. Frozen water pipes thawed, then sprouted leaks at couplings in ceilings and walls over the next few days - first in the Camden County Museum, then in the Charles S. Boyer Building, where the Richard Hineline Library and administrative offices are located, and later in Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Page Talbott, a museum and exhibition consultant, curator, and author, has been named president and chief executive of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the society's board of councilors announced Monday. Talbott, 63, has been acting head of the society since April 2013, when former president Kim Sajet departed to become head of the National Portrait Gallery in Washington. Bruce Fenton, chairman of the society's board, said he is "thrilled" that Talbott will take over, noting she has "worked closely with historic societies and organizations across the region" for four decades.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
As a breed, Hungarian pianists are often so fiercely individual that the best of them project a distinctive sound world all their own. So it was with Dénes Várjon, whose local debut Thursday at the American Philosophical Society was a configuration of repertoire whose components weren't unknown but converged into an overall experience that went to harrowing places. The key piece at this Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert was Bartok's early-period, little-known Two Elegies , one of his most unfiltered expressionistic works, written after the demise of his relationship with violinist Stefi Geyer.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Jason R. Nathan, 84, a government official who oversaw the construction of public housing projects throughout the Northeastern United States during the 1960s, but also went out of his way to fund Society Hill's colonial-style lamp posts and brick sidewalks, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, of heart failure at a Haverford nursing home. Mr. Nathan, who spent most of his adult life in Philadelphia, was running the mid-Atlantic office of the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the period when cities across the country were clear-cutting old neighborhoods and replacing them with cookie-cutter housing towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
As writer, singer, and bandleader, Jack Terricloth has fronted the ever-changing membership of the World/Inferno Friendship Society, a band that features a percussive cabaret-punk sound, and a penchant for tall tales that combine high-mindedness and satire. They play Friday at Union Transfer. Since the W/IFS' 1997 album The True Story of the Bridgewater Astral League , Terricloth and company (as many as 30 musicians have ebbed and flowed, in, out, in), sometimes the mood has changed (gospel sounds have found their way into the mix)
BUSINESS
December 17, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When popular artists like Detroit rapper Eminem , Dutch deejay Tiesto , and dance-music boss Derek "Pretty Lights" Smith talk to their fans online or sell them gear, the software applications, customer service, even the clothing orders are routed through five suites in a converted townhouse row in Society Hill near the end of South Street. That's home to Fame House , a 26-person firm bought last month by the publicly traded electronic-music events manager SFX Entertainment of New York - it runs the Mysteryland festival and the Beatport music-download store, among other live and virtual music portals - to serve as a "digital hub" for the ways music makers reach and sell to their fans.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Amy Worden and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
  NEW YORK The annual migration of the commonwealth's wealthiest and most powerful - otherwise known as the Pennsylvania Society gathering - roared into Manhattan this weekend. This year's event was supposed to be about the governor's race - and the question of whether Gov. Corbett will be able to overcome sagging public approval ratings to earn another term in office. Most of the Democratic candidates vying for his job made the trek to hold fund-raisers and rub elbows with potential supporters and influential advocacy groups.
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