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NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo was the most important word. Whenever it was uttered, the people spoke quietly and bowed their heads. "Moo means peace in our society," said Emily Bosk, 14. "It's very important to our people. " Bosk and some of her classmates at the Friends Central School created a city-state, with its own language, as part of a nine-day interdisciplinary project involving English, social studies, science, math and other subjects. "We're trying to get kids to see their learning is not in little compartments," said Mark Fifer, one of the teachers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sister Mary Theodosia Linus, 98, an elementary school teacher and librarian who served at Catholic schools here and elsewhere, died Sunday, May 3, of cancer at Holy Child Center in Rosemont. She was a sister of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus for 78 years. Born in Philadelphia, Sister Theodosia was one of five children of James and Margaret Ahern Linus. Her family was large and fun-loving. Sister Theo, as she was called, inherited a bright, happy spirit that she carried with her wherever she went, her family said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine being given another human being as your 11th birthday present, as happens to Sarah, the heroine of Sue Monk Kidd's 2014 best-seller, The Invention of Wings . Kidd's fact-based story is about the lives of famed early 19th-century Quaker abolitionist Sarah Grimké and the person she was gifted, her maidservant Handful, an 11-year-old born into slavery. The novel vividly brings to life an era when such an event seemed normal; when slavery was considered natural, even righteous.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Seffrin, 70, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society, will retire next Friday after 40 years with the venerable nonprofit cancer-fighting organization, including 23 at the helm. In an interview this week, he talked about some of the 102-year-old society's accomplishments under his leadership, financial issues, and his plans.   Progress against cancer In 2009, the society (ACS) trademarked the slogan "Official sponsor of birthdays" to highlight that its work to prevent cancer, detect it early, and improve treatment helps people live longer.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police say they are searching for two men who robbed a Society Hill man with what appeared to be an AK-47 rifle outside his house earlier this month. The victim, 52, was getting out of his car on the 300 block of Fifth Street about 2:40 a.m. April 10, after arriving home from a club. That's when he was approached by two men from behind, police said. One was carrying what looked like an AK-47, police said. The men grabbed his wallet and iPhone and then fled in a white SUV. Police said they obtained surveillance footage from the unnamed club that showed the suspects inside, and, later, their SUV, following the victim.
REAL_ESTATE
March 29, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Enter the dining room of Palmer and Judy Hartl's regal rowhouse in Society Hill, and your eye is drawn to an imposing Empire buffet made of crotch mahogany. So powerful is its scale that the piece would be out of place in a less splendid setting. But here, it's right at home, sharing space with a Knabe grand piano, a glass-topped dining table, and a gilded mirror. "The dining room is my favorite place in the home, especially at night, when the lighting looks great," says Palmer Hartl, 72, who sees the same majesty in the 9,000-square-foot, four-story house that he first saw 15 years ago. Back then, the couple owned a three-acre property in Gladwyne with expansive gardens and a pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THANK GOD for the Philadelphia Film Society! On Monday, it officially announced the acquisition of the historic Prince Music Theater, on Chestnut Street near Broad. The beloved theater had been shuttered since October, when the theatrical organization that occupied the building - the American Music Theater Festival - failed to find new leadership after its board chairman died. Prince reps tell me that the beleaguered theater had been in a constant state of bankruptcy but was being floated by its board chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  'Someday My Prince Will Come" is, of course, the signature song from Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs - the animated gem that enjoyed impressive box office at the Karlton, a second-run movie house at 1412 Chestnut St., way back in the spring of 1938. "Someday My Prince Will Come" could also serve as the new anthem for film lovers across Philadelphia and, in particular, Center City, which has fewer dedicated movie screens (14) than many suburban multiplexes.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Coming to a choice parcel on Chestnut Street just west of Broad: neither a chic new condominium nor another drugstore. The Prince Music Theater isn't going anywhere. The defunct theater in the center of town was sold Thursday to the Philadelphia Film Society - a transaction that not only gives the film group a new home, but also preserves the hall's role for arts groups that cannot afford pricier venues like the Kimmel Center. The theater has already reopened for business. Its first show under new ownership - The Last Jimmy , a hip-hop musical - is slated to open March 18. It will still be known as the Prince Theater for the time being.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY ADAM ZAKHEIM
A MEASLES outbreak among more than 100 children has turned political, and apparently so has hand-washing. Earlier this month, repeating the conservative trope of an over-regulated America, Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., told a bipartisan group in our nation's capital that "restaurants should be allowed to opt out of certain regulations, like making employees wash their hands after going to the toilet. " This misguided belief in the primacy of individual liberty over the larger benefits of society often transcends political parties.
SPORTS
February 1, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - The two most recent coaches of the New England Patriots looked very relaxed, quite happy to spend a half-hour or so in each other's company yesterday morning. They turned the annual Friday Super Bowl coaches' joint news conference into a talk-show chat, hosted by affable, telegenic Pete Carroll, with Bill Belichick as the eager guest who has a movie, book or show to plug. In this case, the show airs tomorrow evening at 6:30, when Super Bowl XLIX kicks off. The quest of Belichick and the Patriots to rise above "Spygate" and "Deflategate" for the fourth championship of the Belichick-Tom Brady era runs head on into the quest of Carroll and the Seattle Seahawks to become the first repeat champions in 10 years, and vanquish any doubts about their dominance of the league at mid-decade.
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