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NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo was the most important word. Whenever it was uttered, the people spoke quietly and bowed their heads. "Moo means peace in our society," said Emily Bosk, 14. "It's very important to our people. " Bosk and some of her classmates at the Friends Central School created a city-state, with its own language, as part of a nine-day interdisciplinary project involving English, social studies, science, math and other subjects. "We're trying to get kids to see their learning is not in little compartments," said Mark Fifer, one of the teachers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* RED BAND SOCIETY. 9 tonight, Fox 29. * THE MYSTERIES OF LAURA. 10 tonight, NBC10. * YOU'RE THE WORST. 10:30 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   ARE YOU READY for some high-stakes high jinks? Calling Fox's "Red Band Society" the feel-good show of the fall might be stretching it, but this drama set in a hospital ward full of adolescents with life-threatening conditions isn't nearly as scary as "Grey's Anatomy. " Because the adolescents in this show, adapted from a Spanish series, don't cut people open every week.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it was launched about 50 years ago, the USS Camden represented a milestone. The combat support ship was the final contract in the 68-year history of New York Shipbuilding Corp. in Camden, and dignitaries turned out for the occasion. They listened to the music of the Woodrow Wilson High School Band, which was dwarfed by the ship's hull as members posed with their instruments and smart uniforms. A black-and-white photograph captured the moment and is a small part of the collection of the Camden County Historical Society, now on loan to the Camden Shipyard and Maritime Museum in the 1900 block of Broadway.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child struggling for breath after a nerve-gas attack; a nurse attending to victims of barrel bombs; the tears of a Syrian doctor after a missile destroyed his hospital. Such are the images that haunt the days and nights of Rim Albezem, president of the Philadelphia chapter of the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), a humanitarian-aid group of medical professionals of Syrian descent. "People have the capacity to be very, very monstrous," Albezem said Tuesday, the same day Islamic State extremists released a video depicting the decapitation of American journalist James Foley, who was abducted in Syria two years ago. SAMS wants to be an antidote, said Albezem, 46. "It shows the capacity for good.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
AT 16, KAREN Asper-Jordan went off to the picket line as part of the Cecil B. Moore Freedom Fighters, the Philadelphia civil-rights group that helped lead the efforts to desegregate Girard College. Forty-nine years later, after an event last night inside Reading Terminal Market aimed at promoting a dialogue about race, Asper-Jordan said that she learned how much she's grown since childhood. And that she, too, had some stereotypes that have to be "broken down. " "This dialogue that we have here makes us all think," said Asper-Jordan, 65. "And it makes us evaluate ourselves and our own thought processes.
NEWS
July 29, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
FOR CELESTE A. Morello, a local historian who has applied for historical markers at various sites in the area for two decades, Old St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, in Society Hill, had the significance worthy of such an honor: It's the oldest Roman Catholic church in Philadelphia. The problem was, no one had prepared the in-depth paperwork. So, with the blessings of the church's pastor, that's exactly what she set out to do before the Dec. 1 deadline. "Because it needed it," said Morello, 56, of Norristown.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jason Allen would like to spend the summer reaching out to the community, organizing exhibits, tours, and special programs that tell the history of Camden County. But lately, the executive director of the Camden County Historical Society has been dealing more pressing needs: rehabbing the organization's deteriorating building complex in Camden. A new roof is desperately needed for Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house, and that site, along with the adjacent Camden County Museum, is awaiting about $150,000 in repairs to fix water damage caused by leaking pipes.
SPORTS
July 10, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
HE WAS Martin Luther King one day, Malcolm X another, Jackie Robinson the day after that. Nearly 100 years before each man carved his indelible mark on the tree of American history, Octavius V. Catto hacked away at it, as well, blazing a zealot's trail amid the dangerously racist backdrop of post-Civil War Philadelphia. His assassination at age 32, on the day his exhaustive voting rights efforts flipped the city's corrupt political system upside down, only emphasized the messianic impact he had on his people and his times.
REAL_ESTATE
May 12, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
One thing was clear: Keri White was ready for city life along the Northeast corridor. She was definitely not keen on moving to Arkansas, where her husband's early roots were. And after his days in law school and hers as an undergraduate at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, where they met, both were ready for a change. "So we considered several cities and decided on Philadelphia, although neither of us even knew the city," said Matt White, who began applying for jobs with law firms here.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY CHRIS RABB
RECASTING the overarching narrative that - outside of sports and music - black men and boys are assets vs. a drain on society is a radical one, based on invisible truths that are no less real. This is the apparent goal of the White House's recent My Brother's Keeper initiative. However, there is another challenging truth that makes this bold civic strategy more complex: The reason African-Americans are in this country at all is because our black ancestors were also highly valuable assets, literally.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he came to work in January, Jason Allen got a chilly reception. A boiler pump providing heat for the Camden County Historical Society building complex in Camden had broken down during the holiday break as outside temperatures plummeted to single digits. Allen, the society's executive director, quickly called in a contractor, who restored the heat but unintentionally set in motion an even bigger problem that will end up costing about $100,000. Frozen water pipes thawed, then sprouted leaks at couplings in ceilings and walls over the next few days - first in the Camden County Museum, then in the Charles S. Boyer Building, where the Richard Hineline Library and administrative offices are located, and later in Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house.
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