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NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By J. Nick Pitts I am not sorry for being white. And you shouldn't be sorry for your ethnicity, either. Royce Mann's poem "White Boy Privilege" is the latest video to go viral, with mainstream outlets like CNN and USA Today picking up the story. Performing his slam poem in front of his peers at a school in Atlanta, Mann apologizes repeatedly for something he had no control over. "Dear women, I'm sorry. Dear black people, I'm sorry. ... Dear everyone who isn't a middle- or upper-class white boy, I'm sorry.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
The Hollywood of the 1930s - swank watering holes, Deco manses, pristine beaches, roofs of Spanish tile - has never looked so good. If Woody Allen gets one thing right in Café Society , his 47th (!) feature, it's the hiring of cinematographer Vittorio Storaro. But maybe even that was a mistake. Enlisting the director of photography of such seared-in-memory masterworks as Apocalypse Now and The Conformist only reinforces how forgettable just about everything, and everyone, in Café Society is/are.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By J. Nick Pitts I am not sorry for being white. And you shouldn't be sorry for your ethnicity, either. Royce Mann's poem "White Boy Privilege" is the latest video to go viral, with mainstream outlets like CNN and USA Today picking up the story. Performing his slam poem in front of his peers at a school in Atlanta, Mann apologizes repeatedly for something he had no control over. "Dear women, I'm sorry. Dear black people, I'm sorry. ... Dear everyone who isn't a middle- or upper-class white boy, I'm sorry.
NEWS
July 14, 2016
By Mark Tyler As I joined thousands of leaders and members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church at our bicentennial celebration against the backdrop of a nation in turmoil, a question floated in the air: Is there no balm in Gilead? The question is a verse in the Bible raised by the prophet Jeremiah and is timely after the tragic events of last week. We are a nation in search of a healing. Alton Sterling, a father of five, was shot and killed in Baton Rouge, La., when he was approached by the police.
NEWS
July 10, 2016
On June 10, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) hosted its grand finale to its fund-raising competition with the announcement of the 2016 Man and Woman of the Year. The Eastern Pa. chapter of LLS, the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to finding cures for blood cancer, set a goal of raising $500,000 in the competition, which started March 29. About 400 attended the event at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. The $384,000 in proceeds will go toward finding a cure for leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, STAFF WRITER
Michael Fraser, chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, is resigning to become executive director of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials effective next month, both groups announced Tuesday. Fraser, a sociology PhD who has held various positions in public and policy inside and outside government, took over the 16,000-member physicians' group headquartered in Harrisburg in August 2013. "Mike led PAMED at a time of change, making tough decisions to strengthen and re-position our organization," said board chair David Talenti.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman
The dates were so bad, so epically awful, that Angie started blogging about them: The man whose ex-wife showed up in the middle of their restaurant dinner and threatened to kill herself. The guy who suggested they meet in front of a bar, then confessed that he didn't drink and was strapped for cash. There were men who wanted to get married in a hot minute, men who bore no resemblance to their online profile pictures, men who sweated profusely even while sitting still. It was enough to make Angie, then a naval architect in Washington, rethink her longtime life plan: the "forever" guy, the baby, the white picket fence.
NEWS
June 6, 2016
On May 5, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania hosted its 2016 Founders Award dinner at the Union League. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania is one of the oldest historical organizations in the United States and houses one of the largest family history libraries, with more than 600,000 printed items and 21 million manuscripts. More than 235 attendees enjoyed the dinner-and-cocktail reception. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner was presented the Founder's Award, and documentary filmmaker Sam Katz was honored with the Heritage Award.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A woman whose body was found on a Society Hill street on May 7 died of natural causes, the Medical Examiner's Office said Tuesday. Lorraine Grant, 58, suffered from heart disease, Jeff Moran, the office's spokesman, said. She was found unresponsive on South Fifth Street near Lombard about 10:35 a.m. Saturday, May 7, and was pronounced dead 10 minutes later by medics at the scene, police have said. shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592 @julieshawphilly  
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The Camden County Historical Society is back, and so are "Nipper," Lord Camden, and former Camden Mayor Gwendolyn Faison. The society's grand reopening Sunday will feature a new, permanent display of an original stained-glass window depicting the trademark RCA-Victor terrier. A recently restored Raphael Senseman portrait of the British aristocrat for whom the city is named, and a panoramic new mural by Philadelphia artist Donna M. Backues, highlighting notables such as Faison, also will greet visitors for the first time.
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