CollectionsSociety
IN THE NEWS

Society

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo was the most important word. Whenever it was uttered, the people spoke quietly and bowed their heads. "Moo means peace in our society," said Emily Bosk, 14. "It's very important to our people. " Bosk and some of her classmates at the Friends Central School created a city-state, with its own language, as part of a nine-day interdisciplinary project involving English, social studies, science, math and other subjects. "We're trying to get kids to see their learning is not in little compartments," said Mark Fifer, one of the teachers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | John Timpane, Staff Writer
After more than half a century, the Society Hill Playhouse will close its doors permanently on April 1, according to an announcement released Thursday by cofounder Deen Kogan. The playhouse, located at 507 8th Street, was founded in 1959 by Jay and Deen Kogan in the former David Garrick Hall. The two had met as Temple students, were married in 1950, and after earning advanced degrees in theater, returned to Philadelphia, where they became part of the local theater scene. They purchased the old Garrick Hall for a reported $10,000.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | BY SIGNE WILKINSON
IN 1879, the then-wildly popular Puck Magazine published a cartoon by Joseph Keppler called "The Religious Vanity Fair. " In a two-page drawing, Keppler mockingly depicted "The Arcade of True Faith," featuring a Catholic priest selling indulgences, a hook-nosed Jew, a financial trickster Presbyterian, a polygamist Mormon, a mortify-your-body Methodist, a dotty Episcopalian priest, a rotund new-age preacher pushing the "Love Road to Heaven" and...
NEWS
December 15, 2015
NEW YORK - The 117th Pennsylvania Society gala over the weekend was odd. Odd beyond the basic oddness of thousands of Pennsylvanians trekking lemming-like each December to preen and be seen in the Big Apple in praise of home-state politics. An event long known for its annual sameness this year broke its own mold - no doubt because this year there isn't much to praise. State budget mess? Kathleen Kane? Supreme Court mess? Porngate? The Legislature? The Wolf administration?
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state budget impasse is taking some degree of shine off the forthcoming Pennsylvania Society weekend in New York City, traditionally the premiere hobnobbing event for political leaders, brokers, and candidates. On Wednesday, as lawmakers again left the Capitol without a deal, Gov. Wolf became the latest official to announce that he would not make the trip if the stalemate was not resolved. He joined a chorus of legislative leaders from both parties who have also canceled their plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though the libraries and bookstores of the world are full of great but forgotten music, significant out-of-the-blue discoveries, such as those presented on Sunday by the Delius Society, seem like flukes in the universe. Two 20th-century names almost completely unknown in the music world - Herbert Murrill (1909-1952) and Norman O'Neill (1875-1934) - arrived at the German Society of Philadelphia with music you could immediately love, though for rather different reasons. From what little we know of both composers, these pieces were departures: Murrill's from his choral works typical of the era, and O'Neill's from the incidental music he produced for plays from Shakespeare to Maeterlinck.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than four dozen people are expected to dine Thursday at the Ethical Society of Philadelphia, but it won't just be those eating who are thankful, said Barbara Pearl, one of the event's coordinators. This year, turkeys can be thankful, too. That's because the Thanksgiving dinner will be missing the traditional centerpiece - as well as any other foods that contains animal products. With the support of the local vegan community and the Ethical Society, 1906 Rittenhouse Square, Pearl is cohosting a vegan Thanksgiving potluck.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Listening to Charles Ives can be like conversing with someone both brilliant and moderately demented: You'll be taken by unexpected routes to familiar places and won't always follow the logic of how you got there. Yet Ives was often shockingly sensible in the evening of his four violin/piano sonatas by violinist Stefan Jackiw and pianist Jeremy Denk on Thursday at the Kimmel Center. The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert benefited from lots of context. A vocal quartet headed by Randall Scarlata sang the hymns incorporated into the music, and Denk, in between-performance comments, confirmed he's one of classical music's great explainers.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By David Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a blood-soaked battlefield in colonial New Jersey, a lone preacher stood tall, attempting to bring solace to his embattled compatriots. This is the pose that master sculptor Roger Wing chose for a monument at Old Pine Street Church to honor the Rev. George Duffield, a Revolutionary War preacher, co-chaplain to the Continental Congress, minister to the Pennsylvania militia, and editor of the first American Bible. Duffield led the institution at Fourth and Pine Streets that was known as the Church of the Patriots, thanks to his fiery sermons preaching no taxation without representation.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
An elderly Society Hill man walked through his front door Sunday night to find a stranger standing behind a curtain, who demanded cash and guns and then tried to steal the man's car. The 84-year-old man had been sitting in his car outside his home on the 200 block of Delancey Street when the intruder walked up to his front door and let himself in, police said. He hid behind a curtain until the homeowner walked inside, and when confronted, declared, "I was told you have guns and a lot of cash.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THREE YEARS AGO, cops rushed to the Sheraton Philadelphia Society Hill for radio calls of a disturbance and came upon a chaotic scene of multiple fights among members of one or two wedding parties. Yesterday, two men who had been charged with aggravated assault - for a police sergeant who suffered a concussion in the melee - faced a nonjury trial. But before the trial, Brian Lanza, 32, opted to plead guilty to a simple-assault charge. As part of his plea deal, he received two years' probation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|