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NEWS
October 22, 2004
THE FACT that Lynn Cheney and the right-wing pundits pounced on John Kerry for mentioning the vice president's daughter is indicative of how far they had to stretch in order to find fault with Kerry at the debate. If this is the worst thing that they could come up with, they are clearly grasping at straws. The entire ordeal could have been avoided if George Bush wasn't in favor of incorporating discrimination into the Constitution. It is unconscionable that Mr. Cheney is not willing to stand up to ensure that his own daughter is assured the same rights that he enjoys.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Sally Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Virginia Allen Geyelin, 95, of Villanova, a society writer for the Evening Bulletin and a travel agent, died Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Geyelin was born into the society she chronicled. She graduated from Agnes Irwin School in 1924, and that year made her debut at a tea in her home in Rittenhouse Square and at a dance given by her parents at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. A lifelong tennis player, she won the women's doubles tennis championship at the Penn Athletic Club in 1931 and also won tennis tournaments at Mount Desert Island in Maine, where her family summered every year.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cliff Hall, a noted society entertainer and bandleader whose career was cut short two decades ago by a stroke, died yesterday. He was 77 and lived in Lake Worth, Fla. The Cliff Hall Orchestra, which still performs around the country, came under the direction of Hall's close friend and associate, Neal Smith, when Hall suffered a stroke 22 years ago at the height of his popularity. Smith, whose orchestra played for parties at the past Presidential Inaugural, said: "Three or four of us owe our whole musical careers to him. He did so much for us. He was the greatest entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Staff Writer Scott Flander
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Thursday, April 28, 1994.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
White House chief of staff Howard H. Baker Jr. was caught ruminating recently on the general drift of American idealism, or more accurately, the lack thereof. He saw a "bland society" out there, a "passive, comfortable" society where "materialism is a palliative" and patriotism and values are passe. In a way, his remarks provided a nice backdrop for another unburdening: the commencement address to Ohio State University law graduates by William J. Brennan Jr., the U.S. Supreme Court's senior justice.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BY STEVE PURCELL
Socialization is the process whereby an individual is inculcated with the values of his society. It begins the second a baby peeks from out of his mother's womb. Socialization is the process whereby an individual learns right and wrong, as his society defines it; the standards of success in his society and how he can achieve them; his obligations as a citizen. Socialization is accomplished through participation in family and neighborhood. It is accomplished through participation in religious, educational and political institutions.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
A federal judge in Washington had no hesitation last week in ordering the Justice Department to reveal the names of almost 1,200 people it jailed after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "Secret arrests are 'a concept odious to a democratic society,' and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours," said U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler, quoting an earlier ruling in her own decision. . . . The [U.S. State Department] continues to insist . . . that secrecy was necessary to keep information from Osama bin Laden and other terrorists still at large.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Delaware County Historical Society has concluded its long search for a permanent home with the purchase yesterday of a second facility, a three-story former downtown bank building. The building will be used as a museum, research center, archive and document reproduction center, and as the site for many of the society's youth-education programs. The 21,000-square-foot building most recently was used for offices and as a check-cashing center. Before that, it housed the Delaware County National Bank and that bank's successors.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ruth Jones of Thorndale remembers when trains rumbled through Caln Township and stopped at the tidy cream-and-brown freight station off Route 30 in Thorndale. The trains took on coal for their steam engines and, in later years, the station was the place where farmers from the surrounding area loaded their cattle on special freight cars. The station was demolished about 1942. And for many years it seemed as though it was only longtime residents such as Jones who could bring it back, at least in memory.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo was the most important word. Whenever it was uttered, the people spoke quietly and bowed their heads. "Moo means peace in our society," said Emily Bosk, 14. "It's very important to our people. " Bosk and some of her classmates at the Friends Central School created a city-state, with its own language, as part of a nine-day interdisciplinary project involving English, social studies, science, math and other subjects. "We're trying to get kids to see their learning is not in little compartments," said Mark Fifer, one of the teachers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The Camden County Historical Society is back, and so are "Nipper," Lord Camden, and former Camden Mayor Gwendolyn Faison. The society's grand reopening Sunday will feature a new, permanent display of an original stained-glass window depicting the trademark RCA-Victor terrier. A recently restored Raphael Senseman portrait of the British aristocrat for whom the city is named, and a panoramic new mural by Philadelphia artist Donna M. Backues, highlighting notables such as Faison, also will greet visitors for the first time.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A woman was found dead on a Society Hill street Saturday morning, police said. The woman, who appeared to be in her 50s, was found unresponsive on South Fifth Street near Lombard Street about 10:35 a.m., police said. She was pronounced dead 10 minutes later by medics at the scene. A police spokeswoman said the cause of death will be determined by the Medical Examiner's Office after an autopsy is conducted. - Julie Shaw
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The law signed by Gov. Wolf on Sunday legalizing medical marijuana in Pennsylvania provides for an ambitious set of research programs to track how the drug works on the 17 health conditions listed in the law. But investigations are already underway, and the Pennsylvania Medical Society held a telephone conference Wednesday to discuss recent scientific findings. Many doctors remain dubious of pot's health benefits and are wary of the politics driving legalization. But the evidence of its effectiveness in some conditions is slowly mounting.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
Having great chamber music easily accessible a couple of times a week in town is greeted as the natural order of things. But it was hardly inevitable, and is largely thanks to one man: Anthony P. Checchia, founding artistic director of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. Checchia's modesty has obscured the scale of his feat; PCMS, now 30 years old, is presenting about 60 concerts per season. Checchia's fans finally caught up with him Thursday night. They filled the Perelman Theater to hear speeches, stand for an ovation in his honor, and cheer board chairman Jerry G. Rubenstein when he thanked Checchia for building "arguably the greatest chamber music series in the U.S. " No one is likely to argue.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Tom Di Nardo, For The Inquirer
'We want the public to hear great music at prices they can afford. " That has been Anthony Checchia's mantra, whether founding the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society 30 years ago, or presenting concerts 25 years before that. The society has become the largest presenter of chamber music in the country, now giving 60 concerts of major artists each season. It insists on prices from $18 to $24 (with a $4 Kimmel Center fee for shows at its Perelman Theater), though the same concert in New York a few days later goes for three times that.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Columnist
My best guy friend and I live two blocks away from each other, and we share one very particular interest: Gilbert & Sullivan. William S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan were the writer-composer duo who created 14 comic operas in the late 19th century. Their humor is satirical and heavy on wordplay and pokes fun at Victorian England and theatrical clich├ęs of the day. Don't make that face. Before Hamilton and rap musicals, there were patter-songs. While others bonded over keg stands in college, my friend and I grew close standing on stage in various G&S productions.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
Even the intermediate piano student could play through the first 30 seconds of Schubert's Piano Sonata in B Major, D. 575 and hear that something crazy is going on. It wasn't just Schubert. There are any number of ways one could map in a single program the strangely precarious state of traditional harmony, but none more deliciously subversive than the route Paul Lewis chose Thursday night. The English pianist's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital debut at the Perelman looked harmless on paper - Schubert, Brahms, and Liszt.
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
After almost 56 years of community theater, the Society Hill Playhouse is expected to close on April 1. It's putting on one last premiere - a two-night show Friday and Saturday - titled Liberty Radio Theatre , by Bill Arrowood. It's a show modeled after classic radio drama. "For an old-timey show like this, the Society Hill is the right room," Arrowood said. Deen Kogan, who cofounded the theater in 1959, is "a big noir buff," Arrowood said, "so I wrote the last episode of the play for her. " (On March 19, the theater will host "Noir at the Bar," a gala night of readings by noir authors in honor of the theater and its longtime role as host of NoirCon.)
NEWS
February 27, 2016
By W. Wilson Goode Sr. The Maasai tribe in Kenya is known around the world because its members are mighty warriors. They are fierce fighters, and they are protectors of the women and children in the villages. I speak of them not because they are mighty warriors, but because of the way they greet one another. They don't do it the way we do it. We say, "Good morning," "Good afternoon," or "Good evening. " They greet others with a question: "How are the children?" Well, how are the children?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2016
Valentine's Day @ the PFS Roxy Noon to 10:15 p.m. Sunday at the PFS at the Roxy Bring some beer or a bottle of wine for a BYO party featuring a daylong program of films about love in all its shades, including Rob Reiner's divine fantasy, The Princess Bride (rated PG; at noon); the deliciously dangerous noir Double Indemnity (no MPAA rating; 2:10 p.m.), Romeo + Juliet featuring the young Leonardo DiCaprio (PG-13; 4:30 p.m.), and James Cameron's Titanic , pairing Leo with Kate Winslet (PG-13; 7 p.m.)
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