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Soda Bread

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FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
This classic Irish quick bread - no rising time needed - lends itself to numerous creative variations. Traditional recipes often call for nothing but flour, salt, baking soda and buttermilk or yogurt. Currants are a common addition, but that's just the start. Any number of seeds, nuts, chopped dried fruit, and even chocolate can be added. For our take on soda bread, we decided to have a little of everything. We started with a rich take on the classic recipe, studding it with currants and caraway seeds.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Want to celebrate the Celtic New Year in a truly Irish tradition? Consider toasting the day with "An Evening of Poetry. " The Rev. Michael Doyle will read his original work tonight at 7 at the Walt Whitman Cultural Arts Center, Second and Cooper Streets, Camden. The program also opens the center's 1992-93 Walt Whitman Poetry Series. Father Doyle, pastor of Camden's Sacred Heart Church, is a community activist and community developer as well as a poet. He was born in County Longford, Ireland, and was ordained in Ireland, where he lived for 24 years.
NEWS
March 17, 2008 | By Elizabeth McGinley
It was 2:55 p.m., nearly dismissal time, when the P.A. box in the front of my sixth-grade classroom crackled to life: "Sister, will you send Elizabeth McGinley to the principal's office - immediately. " Sister Alice Regina looked at me - "What have you done?" clearly written on her face - and said, "All right, Elizabeth, you heard Mother Superior. " My seat mate, Mary Patricia, her blouse collar as crisp and white as it had been at 8:30 a.m., pointed to my left navy knee-high sock, which was bunched around my ankle.
FOOD
March 12, 1997 | By Lucy Barajikian, FOR THE INQUIRER
The cool, moist climate of Ireland that turns valleys and hills a lush emerald green calls for sturdy fare. Hence the popularity of such national delights as steaming bowls of nourishing Irish beef stew; baked, fried or roasted potatoes; and glasses brimming with stout - all good examples of proper "filler" fare. Woven into the fabric of the meal are the baked products of the country, and in Ireland, that means fresh-baked, compact and craggy, full-flavored Irish soda bread, a perfect addition for your own St. Patrick's Day celebration Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
From now through Monday, which is St. Patrick's Day, just about every pub, restaurant and bar with an Irish name - and many of those without one - will be serving the likes of corned beef and cabbage. At The Bards, on Walnut Street near 20th, the truth is that you can have some fine Irish food without indulging in even a forkful of that brine-cured brisket - which is certainly a worthy dish, but in no way a reflection of true Irish cuisine. The restaurant is operated by Patrick and Regina Whelan of Dublin.
FOOD
March 13, 2002 | By Marlene Parrish and Margaret M. Johnson FOR THE INQUIRER
Name five famous Irish exports. High on that list are Waterford crystal, Irish linen, Belleek china, Irish whiskey, and shamrocks. (Sorry, leprechauns aren't exported.) Now try naming five Irish gourmet dishes. It may be a bit harder, but today it's not impossible. Ireland is not, and never was, a melting pot of cultures. The country, no larger than the state of Maine, is isolated. Hanging out there in the Atlantic off the coast of England and Scotland, it was never much of a destination for conquering navies.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What's the difference between an Irishman and a Scotsman? According to Bill Reid, not that much. "They're Celtic cousins," he says. This weekend, festival promoter Reid - who is of Scottish descent and married to an Irish woman - brought together kilt-clad clans and Irish lads and lasses for a family reunion of sorts. The occasion was the fifth annual Scottish and Irish Music Festival and Fair, a midwinter celebration melding the lands' heritages, music, crafts and culture.
FOOD
November 26, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There's no TV at the bar at the Irish Bards. No accident, says Marion Ryder, one of the Irish Bard's four Irish-born owners. "We want people to talk to each other. The way they would in Ireland. " She isn't kidding. When it looked as though a friend (recently returned from a vacation in Ireland) and I were weren't getting into the spirit of the new Irish restaurant and bar, Ryder came to our table to chat. Within minutes we were laughing and swapping Irish stories.
FOOD
February 2, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine this: An hour after you walk through the door this evening, you've got dinner on the table, complete with crusty brown bread, fresh from the oven. Even if everything else you're serving came out of the freezer, this is going to make that everything else taste terrific. And it's so easy (ridiculously easy if you've got a food processor) that even if there was a bread machine under the Christmas tree this year, you might want to try this bread unplugged. It's Irish brown bread (sometimes called soda bread)
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FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
This classic Irish quick bread - no rising time needed - lends itself to numerous creative variations. Traditional recipes often call for nothing but flour, salt, baking soda and buttermilk or yogurt. Currants are a common addition, but that's just the start. Any number of seeds, nuts, chopped dried fruit, and even chocolate can be added. For our take on soda bread, we decided to have a little of everything. We started with a rich take on the classic recipe, studding it with currants and caraway seeds.
NEWS
March 17, 2008 | By Elizabeth McGinley
It was 2:55 p.m., nearly dismissal time, when the P.A. box in the front of my sixth-grade classroom crackled to life: "Sister, will you send Elizabeth McGinley to the principal's office - immediately. " Sister Alice Regina looked at me - "What have you done?" clearly written on her face - and said, "All right, Elizabeth, you heard Mother Superior. " My seat mate, Mary Patricia, her blouse collar as crisp and white as it had been at 8:30 a.m., pointed to my left navy knee-high sock, which was bunched around my ankle.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2008
Q: If an Irish soda bread recipe calls for shortening, can you use olive oil instead? Do you have a traditional Irish soda bread recipe that you can share? Thank you. - Brenda M. A: I'm envious of anyone who can say they are 100 percent or a first-generation American of any nationality because I am a 100 percent American Mutt. Oh sure, Coleman has Irish roots, but those roots have been grafted with Scottish, English, German (the list goes on) stock. But today, since we're talking about soda bread, my Irish eyes are smilin'.
FOOD
March 13, 2002 | By Marlene Parrish and Margaret M. Johnson FOR THE INQUIRER
Name five famous Irish exports. High on that list are Waterford crystal, Irish linen, Belleek china, Irish whiskey, and shamrocks. (Sorry, leprechauns aren't exported.) Now try naming five Irish gourmet dishes. It may be a bit harder, but today it's not impossible. Ireland is not, and never was, a melting pot of cultures. The country, no larger than the state of Maine, is isolated. Hanging out there in the Atlantic off the coast of England and Scotland, it was never much of a destination for conquering navies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
From now through Monday, which is St. Patrick's Day, just about every pub, restaurant and bar with an Irish name - and many of those without one - will be serving the likes of corned beef and cabbage. At The Bards, on Walnut Street near 20th, the truth is that you can have some fine Irish food without indulging in even a forkful of that brine-cured brisket - which is certainly a worthy dish, but in no way a reflection of true Irish cuisine. The restaurant is operated by Patrick and Regina Whelan of Dublin.
FOOD
March 12, 1997 | By Lucy Barajikian, FOR THE INQUIRER
The cool, moist climate of Ireland that turns valleys and hills a lush emerald green calls for sturdy fare. Hence the popularity of such national delights as steaming bowls of nourishing Irish beef stew; baked, fried or roasted potatoes; and glasses brimming with stout - all good examples of proper "filler" fare. Woven into the fabric of the meal are the baked products of the country, and in Ireland, that means fresh-baked, compact and craggy, full-flavored Irish soda bread, a perfect addition for your own St. Patrick's Day celebration Monday.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What's the difference between an Irishman and a Scotsman? According to Bill Reid, not that much. "They're Celtic cousins," he says. This weekend, festival promoter Reid - who is of Scottish descent and married to an Irish woman - brought together kilt-clad clans and Irish lads and lasses for a family reunion of sorts. The occasion was the fifth annual Scottish and Irish Music Festival and Fair, a midwinter celebration melding the lands' heritages, music, crafts and culture.
FOOD
November 26, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There's no TV at the bar at the Irish Bards. No accident, says Marion Ryder, one of the Irish Bard's four Irish-born owners. "We want people to talk to each other. The way they would in Ireland. " She isn't kidding. When it looked as though a friend (recently returned from a vacation in Ireland) and I were weren't getting into the spirit of the new Irish restaurant and bar, Ryder came to our table to chat. Within minutes we were laughing and swapping Irish stories.
FOOD
February 2, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine this: An hour after you walk through the door this evening, you've got dinner on the table, complete with crusty brown bread, fresh from the oven. Even if everything else you're serving came out of the freezer, this is going to make that everything else taste terrific. And it's so easy (ridiculously easy if you've got a food processor) that even if there was a bread machine under the Christmas tree this year, you might want to try this bread unplugged. It's Irish brown bread (sometimes called soda bread)
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