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Soft Boys

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
In his notes to Underwater Moonlight, Matador's new two-CD rerelease of the Soft Boys' 1980 swan song with additional tracks and rehearsal tapes, David Fricke asks: Did punk-rock and the end of the '70s have to mean the end of joy, literacy and bright voices? No was the answer from singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock, guitarist Kimberly Rew, drummer Morris Windsor, and bassist Matthew Seligman, who started up the Soft Boys in 1976 as the jangly, psychedelic, vexingly lyrical (Hitchcock has a penchant for relating to love with larval/alien metaphors)
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Robyn Hitchcock has such a well-deserved reputation as an oddball - all those songs about insects, fish and viscous fluids - that it is easy to overlook his considerable talents as a melodist, guitarist and singer with a John Lennon sting in his voice. On Tuesday at the Theatre of Living Arts, Hitchcock made his ample attributes apparent as he fronted the Soft Boys, the punk-era band featuring guitarist Kimberley Rew, drummer Morris Windsor, and bassist Matthew Seligman that he founded in Cambridge, England (significantly, the birthplace of Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Robyn Hitchcock may just be the last of the great English eccentrics. Like Kevin Ayers, Roy Harper, Robert Wyatt, and his hero, Pink Floyd fire-starter Syd Barrett, Hitchcock has forever crafted a sound - alone or with his first notable ensemble, the Soft Boys - whimsically and surrealistically literate with melodies steeped in folk traditionalism, psychedelia, and art-pop. His lyrics, sung in a gloriously nasal English accent reminiscent of a young Lennon or Bowie, express pent-up ire, frustration, mirth, and joy, while dazzling the listener/reader with their bold, odd intelligence and black humor.
NEWS
April 2, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
So, Robyn Hitchcock, longtime darling of the rock and roll underground, how has your life changed since the release of your first major-label album, Globe of Frogs? "It means we get the ceiling repainted each week," he said from a hotel in Atlanta, where he and his group, the Egyptians, were preparing for a brief tour of the United States that brings them to Trenton's City Gardens tonight and to the Chestnut Cabaret on Monday. "I also get lots of duplicate information in the form of memos.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | by Sara Sherr For the Daily News
Lenola and Atom and His Package, two local treasures, get ready to release new albums this week. Tonight at the Upstage (at 10, 22 S. 3rd St., 215-627-4825, $6) are New Jersey psych-popsters Lenola, treating us to "Treat Me to Some Life" (File 13), which continues in the same melodic direction of 1999's "My Secret Name" (Tappersize). The band continues growing as songwriters, closing the gap between '60s psychedelia, hazy '80s Britpop, and Elephant Six, and basically finding beauty wherever they can. Opening is The Photon Band's Art DiFuria and The Science Of. Atom and His Package, the one person in Philadelphia who is likely to make you smile despite yourself, heads an all-ages bill at the Rotunda (7 p.m. Wednesday, 4012 Walnut St., www.r5productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2001 | by Jonathan Takiff Daily News Staff Writer
THE YOUNG FRESH FELLOWS and THE SOFT BOYS, 8 tonight, TLA, 334 South Street. Tickets: $18. Info: 215-922-1011. Scott McCaughey is one perverse and confusing guy - bless his pointed little head. I mean, like, how can you trust someone who fronts two different rock groups and then has the nerve to "pit" them as rivals in a double disc, battle of the bands shoot-out - "Young Fresh Fellows: Because We Hate You" vs. The Minus 5: "Let the War Against Music Begin" (just out on Malt/Mammoth CDs, LPs and 8-tracks)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Not to worry, dear reader: There are no creepy, crawly, disgusting creatures oozing across the screen in Robyn Hitchcock: Sex, Food, Death . . . And Insects, the one-hour documentary film being shown on the Sundance Channel at 10 p.m. on Tuesday. The dark and disturbing stuff that goes on is all inside the head - and the songs - of Hitchcock, the British singer and guitarist who plays the World Caf? Live on Monday with his band the Venus 3, which includes Peter Buck (of R.E.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Robyn Hitchcock, who will appear at Haverford College tomorrow night, is one of the most original and underrated of all current rock-music creators. This English songwriter, guitarist and singer has spent the first half of the 1980s creating literate, funny and occasionally scary visions of modern life. Singing in a scratchy murmur, Hitchcock has led two bands, the Soft Boys and the Egyptians. For both of them, he has written songs that combine rough- edged rock with verbal inventiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
There are entirely too many things to do tonight. If you've got the fortitude, you'll be rewarded by an excellent, five-band garage-punk bill at the Balcony. It's a belated celebration for Thee Minks, who just released "Songs About Boys," a pink vinyl 7-inch on local label Steel Cage Records featuring four go-go-boots-powered cuts from tattooed love girls who sound like they've lived and are still living. Boston's (mostly male) answer to Thee Minks is Downbeat 5, which includes JJ Rassler of '70s Boston punks DMZ and his powerhouse wife, frontwoman Jen Rassler.
NEWS
December 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Robyn Hitchcock was a boy, he wanted to be a mad scientist. "The only problem was I was never very good at math," says the 51-year-old singer, sitting at a Philadelphia restaurant. "Then I heard Dylan, and my soul was magnetized by music. And I wanted to be a cult figure, a curly-haired Jewish boy from Minnesota with sunglasses. " That didn't work out either, recalls Hitchcock, whose lovely, unsettling and perfectly titled new album, Spooked (Yep Roc), was recorded last winter with American roots musicians David Rawlings and Gillian Welch.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Robyn Hitchcock may just be the last of the great English eccentrics. Like Kevin Ayers, Roy Harper, Robert Wyatt, and his hero, Pink Floyd fire-starter Syd Barrett, Hitchcock has forever crafted a sound - alone or with his first notable ensemble, the Soft Boys - whimsically and surrealistically literate with melodies steeped in folk traditionalism, psychedelia, and art-pop. His lyrics, sung in a gloriously nasal English accent reminiscent of a young Lennon or Bowie, express pent-up ire, frustration, mirth, and joy, while dazzling the listener/reader with their bold, odd intelligence and black humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Not to worry, dear reader: There are no creepy, crawly, disgusting creatures oozing across the screen in Robyn Hitchcock: Sex, Food, Death . . . And Insects, the one-hour documentary film being shown on the Sundance Channel at 10 p.m. on Tuesday. The dark and disturbing stuff that goes on is all inside the head - and the songs - of Hitchcock, the British singer and guitarist who plays the World Caf? Live on Monday with his band the Venus 3, which includes Peter Buck (of R.E.M.
NEWS
December 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Robyn Hitchcock was a boy, he wanted to be a mad scientist. "The only problem was I was never very good at math," says the 51-year-old singer, sitting at a Philadelphia restaurant. "Then I heard Dylan, and my soul was magnetized by music. And I wanted to be a cult figure, a curly-haired Jewish boy from Minnesota with sunglasses. " That didn't work out either, recalls Hitchcock, whose lovely, unsettling and perfectly titled new album, Spooked (Yep Roc), was recorded last winter with American roots musicians David Rawlings and Gillian Welch.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
There are entirely too many things to do tonight. If you've got the fortitude, you'll be rewarded by an excellent, five-band garage-punk bill at the Balcony. It's a belated celebration for Thee Minks, who just released "Songs About Boys," a pink vinyl 7-inch on local label Steel Cage Records featuring four go-go-boots-powered cuts from tattooed love girls who sound like they've lived and are still living. Boston's (mostly male) answer to Thee Minks is Downbeat 5, which includes JJ Rassler of '70s Boston punks DMZ and his powerhouse wife, frontwoman Jen Rassler.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Robyn Hitchcock has such a well-deserved reputation as an oddball - all those songs about insects, fish and viscous fluids - that it is easy to overlook his considerable talents as a melodist, guitarist and singer with a John Lennon sting in his voice. On Tuesday at the Theatre of Living Arts, Hitchcock made his ample attributes apparent as he fronted the Soft Boys, the punk-era band featuring guitarist Kimberley Rew, drummer Morris Windsor, and bassist Matthew Seligman that he founded in Cambridge, England (significantly, the birthplace of Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2001 | by Jonathan Takiff Daily News Staff Writer
THE YOUNG FRESH FELLOWS and THE SOFT BOYS, 8 tonight, TLA, 334 South Street. Tickets: $18. Info: 215-922-1011. Scott McCaughey is one perverse and confusing guy - bless his pointed little head. I mean, like, how can you trust someone who fronts two different rock groups and then has the nerve to "pit" them as rivals in a double disc, battle of the bands shoot-out - "Young Fresh Fellows: Because We Hate You" vs. The Minus 5: "Let the War Against Music Begin" (just out on Malt/Mammoth CDs, LPs and 8-tracks)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
In his notes to Underwater Moonlight, Matador's new two-CD rerelease of the Soft Boys' 1980 swan song with additional tracks and rehearsal tapes, David Fricke asks: Did punk-rock and the end of the '70s have to mean the end of joy, literacy and bright voices? No was the answer from singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock, guitarist Kimberly Rew, drummer Morris Windsor, and bassist Matthew Seligman, who started up the Soft Boys in 1976 as the jangly, psychedelic, vexingly lyrical (Hitchcock has a penchant for relating to love with larval/alien metaphors)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | by Sara Sherr For the Daily News
Lenola and Atom and His Package, two local treasures, get ready to release new albums this week. Tonight at the Upstage (at 10, 22 S. 3rd St., 215-627-4825, $6) are New Jersey psych-popsters Lenola, treating us to "Treat Me to Some Life" (File 13), which continues in the same melodic direction of 1999's "My Secret Name" (Tappersize). The band continues growing as songwriters, closing the gap between '60s psychedelia, hazy '80s Britpop, and Elephant Six, and basically finding beauty wherever they can. Opening is The Photon Band's Art DiFuria and The Science Of. Atom and His Package, the one person in Philadelphia who is likely to make you smile despite yourself, heads an all-ages bill at the Rotunda (7 p.m. Wednesday, 4012 Walnut St., www.r5productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the surface, Billy Bragg and Robyn Hitchcock, who will share billing tomorrow night at the Keswick Theater, appear to be cut from the same cloth. Both are British singer-songwriters with longtime cult followings. Each is reappearing after a lengthy absence, and both are blessed with a gift of gab that often makes the spoken interludes the highlight of their concerts. But Bragg, whose new William Bloke (Elektra) is his first album in five years, and Hitchcock, whose Moss Elixir (Warner Bros.
NEWS
May 31, 1993 | By David T. Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rich Stankewicz has grown accustomed to the nicknames, the monikers that filter out of the stands from his anonymous followers. "Sloth" they call him, referring to tree-dwelling mammals who go about in a slow-moving, lazy manner. "Gorg" they yell, alluding to a big stuffed creature on a kids' television show. But Friday night, someone had a new name for Henderson's 6-foot, 2-inch, 235-pound sophomore attackman with the flattop haircut and baby face. Stankewicz, who happens to be coach Paul Stankewicz's son, just completed a scoring drive that started on the left sideline.
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