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Soft Drinks

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NEWS
August 25, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Yo Baby, Yo Baby, Yo Baby, Yo: It's a hot August night and only a tall, cool one can drown the summer doldrums. Try a Coke. Soft drinks are the only beverages sold tonight at Pulsations, the $8 million futuristic nightclub on Rt. 1 in Glen Mills. Tuesday nights are "Rated R" nights at the club, known for its Star Wars special effects and ear-boggling 25,000-watt sound system. The club is open tonight to all over 17 who can afford the $5 cover. "Rated R" night is from 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. Making an appearance tonight and every night is Pulsar, the talking, dancing robot.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
A new study has shown that America's teens are fatter than teens in 14 other nations. Meanwhile, the American Academy of Pediatrics has declared that sodas and sweetened drinks are contributing to childhood obesity, discouraging milk consumption, and causing cavities. Now, here's what may sound like a trick question: As a school district, what would you do? For an increasing number of districts nationwide, the answer is a no-brainer: Stock only milk, water and juice in cafeteria lines and vending machines.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, some good news. Free soft drinks will soon be back on US Airways flights. Philadelphia's dominant airline said today that it will no longer charge $2 for sodas, juices, bottled water and coffee. Starting March 1, the Tempe, Ariz.-based carrier, which shuttles two-thirds of Philadelphia air travelers, will again offer complimentary nonalcoholic beverages. US Airways became the first and only major carrier last June to charge for soft drinks to offset soaring fuel costs.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University is turning to Pepsi to help quench its thirst for cash. That's a lot of Pepsi. For the next five years, the Pepsi-Cola line of soft drinks will be the only ones sold on Temple's five campuses. For exclusive rights, Pepsi will be giving Temple about $4 million in vending commissions and other payments. University officials said they would use the money to buy advanced academic technology equipment and fund student scholarships and endowments for educational and cultural activities.
NEWS
March 2, 1999 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What began as a scuffle among five girls at a teenage dance club Saturday night escalated into an all-out brawl involving 250 young people, and before it ended, police said, one officer had lost several teeth and six juveniles had been arrested. "It was just a sea of bodies. Everybody was swinging, and I don't mean to the music," said Police Officer Paul Runner, one of the first officers to respond to the call about a fight shortly before 11 p.m. at Club Fusion in the Levittown Shopping Center.
NEWS
March 4, 2006 | By David Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When small amounts of benzene, a known cancer-causing chemical, were found in some soft drinks 16 years ago, the Food and Drug Administration never told the public. That is because the beverage industry told the government it would handle the problem and the FDA thought the problem was solved. A decade and a half later, benzene has turned up again. The FDA has found levels in some soft drinks higher than what it found in 1990, and two to four times higher than what is considered safe for drinking water.
NEWS
July 18, 2005 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The size of our sodas may be weighing us down, but there is some good news for our waistlines: We're not drinking as many gallons a year as we used to. A report last week noted a historic reversal in soft-drink fortunes since 1998, when individual consumption averaged 56 gallons a year. In 2004, the figure fell 7 percent, to 52 gallons. "There is a ray of hope," said Michael Jacobson, executive director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington, who wrote the report.
NEWS
March 26, 2016
By Atif Bostic Prekindergarten, community schools, and renovated parks and recreation centers are critically needed services for underserved residents in Philadelphia. But the Kenney administration's plan to fund these important programs with a beverage tax - an unstable and declining revenue source - puts them in jeopardy before they even get started. Moreover, the proposed tax, which would dramatically increase the average grocery bill, would hurt the very families that these programs are designed to serve.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | By Gabriel Escobar, Daily News Staff Writer
The deal is sweet. Until April 30, every time an RC Cola is sold, the city's homeless in the city will share in the proceeds. Royal Crown Cola, the makers of RC Cola and other soft drinks, announced the program yesterday as part of a nationwide initiative to help the homeless in 14 U.S. cities. The recipient in Philadelphia will be the Committee for Dignity and Fairness to the Homeless, which was selected by the National Coalition for the Homeless. For every case of soft drinks sold from now until April 30, the committee will get 8 cents - or a third of a cent for each soda sold.
FOOD
July 19, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
While America marks the 20th anniversary of man's landing on the moon, the folks at General Foods are quietly celebrating another extraordinary technological achievement of the 20th century. It was in 1957 that General Foods scientists gave the world and outer space their first official powdered breakfast drink - Tang. Face facts, America. One of the most enduring benefits to come from outer space since the Russians sent up a satellite named Sputnik was Tang. For many years, it was the breakfast drink of the astronauts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2016
"Nearly 250 years ago, the eyes of the world were on Philadelphia and the birth of American democracy. On Thursday, Philadelphia will again make history by becoming the second U.S. city, and the largest, to pass a tax on soft drinks. " - City Council leaders Darrell L. Clarke, Bobby Henon, Blondell Reynolds Brown, and Bill Greenlee, The Inquirer, June 14 By Mark Randall (with obvious help from Thos. Jefferson) When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dispense with the sugary brands that have consumed them, and that they have consumed, and then resume among the streets of the city that separate and unequal station to which the Laws of Economics and City Council have doomed them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the reasons they should be glad of this.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
A chorus has emerged among those skeptical of Mayor Kenney's plan to tax soda in Philadelphia: Why single out one industry? "How about doughnuts? Things like that?" former Gov. Ed Rendell, the most recent to raise the point, said last week. "I'm a big consumer of Dunkin' Donuts, but why are they exempt?" Is the idea so outrageous? Not if you look around the world. While the United States has not embraced putting broad taxes on food and beverages, other governments have - and often in the name of health.
NEWS
March 26, 2016
By Atif Bostic Prekindergarten, community schools, and renovated parks and recreation centers are critically needed services for underserved residents in Philadelphia. But the Kenney administration's plan to fund these important programs with a beverage tax - an unstable and declining revenue source - puts them in jeopardy before they even get started. Moreover, the proposed tax, which would dramatically increase the average grocery bill, would hurt the very families that these programs are designed to serve.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Mayor Kenney's administration expects to see a 55-percent drop in consumption of sugary drinks in the first year should its controversial taxing plan be approved. That is far lower than the sales drop-off estimated by the soda industry - a staggering 79 percent. Those differing projections, one of many economic factors the two sides diverge on, also lead to considerably different revenue projections for what is the first major proposal of Kenney's tenure. His administration, in new revenue projections released Monday, says the tax would reap $432 million over five years.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
In the political battle that's just begun over his proposal to tax sugary drinks, Mayor Kenney broke bread last Saturday with leaders of Big Soda. Kenney pitched his proposal directly to some of the most influential people in the soft-drink world during a private lunch meeting in swank surroundings, the newspaper has learned. In a back room at Lacroix, the French restaurant on Rittenhouse Square, Kenney and three top aides met with local soda mogul Harold A. Honickman, a few representatives of the Coca-Cola Co., and the chief executive of the American Beverage Association.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
Five years ago, when City Council last considered a soda tax, City Hall's corridors swelled with lobbyists bent on stopping it cold. Representatives of the beverage industry, grocery store owners, and interested unions all but camped out in Council offices, ready to hector members that the levy would kill jobs and unfairly burden the poor. The beverage industry was liberal in its spending, dropping big bucks on advertisements and outreach. "In one word? Intense," said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr. "I've been through some giant public policy issues - school funding, hotels, paid sick leave.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. said Monday it had agreed to sell two soft drink brands to the Japanese company Suntory Beverage & Food Ltd. for $2.1 billion so it can focus on its pharmaceutical products. Glaxo, which is based in London and operates in Philadelphia and surrounding areas, said in February that it would look for a buyer for the drink brands, Lucozade and Ribena. Those brands, which are well known in the United Kingdom but not the United States, generated about $785.5 million in sales in 2012.
TRAVEL
June 16, 2013 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
HANA, Hawaii - About 3:30 every afternoon, the Hertzes, Avises, and Budgets - a veritable red and white wave of compacts, convertibles, SUVs, and generic four-doors - surge out of town carrying thousands of day-trippers back to their glittering resorts in central and western Maui. They have experienced one of the highlights of any Hawaiian vacation - the drive along the Hana Highway, a 55-mile serpent of a road that runs past mountains half-hidden by mist, lava rocks pummeled by surf, slopes of giant green ferns, gardens of tropical plants in vibrant colors, and waterfalls tumbling out of rain forests.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Two men were accused Thursday of selling an alcoholic beverage to unlicensed retail stores throughout New Jersey. Investigators with the state Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control said they found Extracto de Malta in at least 15 supermarkets and bodegas, mainly in Hispanic neighborhoods. It was on shelves among soft drinks and placed next to Malta, a carbonated nonalcoholic beverage, they said. The ABC accused Condal Distributors of the Bronx, N.Y., of putting Extracto de Malta on the streets.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York City's Board of Health signaled strong support this week for the mayor's plan to fight obesity by banning the sale of large, sugary beverages at local restaurants. The proposal by Mayor Michael Bloomberg would prohibit licensed food-service establishments from using containers bigger than 16 ounces to serve high-calorie drinks like colas, lemonade, and punch. People would be free to buy another round, but restaurants couldn't serve the larger cups now so popular at fast-food eateries, movie theaters, and food courts.
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