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Soft Drinks

NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sarah Roisman comes from a good home. Her mother, Lee, is a dentist. Her father, Richard, is a lawyer. The youngest of the family's three children, Sarah always did well in school, had well-mannered friends, and spent her summers playing softball at a camp in Maine. She sneaked her first glass of vodka at 12. By the time she celebrated her bat mitzvah, she had been drinking heavily on weekends for months. At 15, she was supporting a $100-a-day cocaine habit, popping prescription pills from her friends' parents' medicine cabinets, and consuming more than a bottle of champagne in a night.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
March 16, 2010
Cut aid to Israel The slap to America's face that Israel gave, by announcing expansion of settlements in Jerusalem, should be answered by cessation of the billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars we give Israel annually - which help construct the settlements ("Israel's apology gets a cool reception," Monday). Mere words of disapproval are not enough to dispel U.S. bias in favor of Israel, which prevents our being viewed as an honest broker in the Israeli-Palestinian dispute.
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The food and beverage industry is mobilizing against Mayor Nutter's proposed tax on sweet drinks, with a rush of activity that has City Hall bracing for a "madhouse. " Lobbyists are buttonholing City Council members. Trade groups and the unions have locked arms. Industry ads are sprouting on the air and in print extolling the good corporate citizenship of soft-drink companies. The public has weighed in with hundreds of calls and e-mails. All of this one week after the mayor proposed a 2 cents-per-ounce tax on all sweetened drinks as a way to raise revenue for the 2011 budget, and to combat obesity.
NEWS
March 2, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
KEEP YOUR wallets handy. A fee for trash collection and a tax on sugary beverages are expected to be included in Mayor Nutter's budget proposal, which he is set to unveil on Thursday, sources tell the Daily News . Details were limited on exactly how those charges would work. Sources said the trash fee was likely to be a flat per-household charge. Finance Director Rob Dubow wouldn't comment on the contents of the budget, except to again note that the city has a substantial budget gap. "We're facing really tough decisions because the size of the problem is really large and we've [already]
BUSINESS
February 24, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, some good news. Free soft drinks will soon be back on US Airways flights. Philadelphia's dominant airline said today that it will no longer charge $2 for sodas, juices, bottled water and coffee. Starting March 1, the Tempe, Ariz.-based carrier, which shuttles two-thirds of Philadelphia air travelers, will again offer complimentary nonalcoholic beverages. US Airways became the first and only major carrier last June to charge for soft drinks to offset soaring fuel costs.
NEWS
June 13, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You want a Coke at 30,000 feet? It's going to cost you $2. US Airways yesterday became the first major airline to announce that it would charge for soft drinks, among other sweeping initiatives that include layoffs, to offset spiraling fuel costs. The region's dominant airline, which transports two-thirds of the passengers at Philadelphia International Airport, also followed the lead of American and United Airlines in charging $15 for a first checked bag. US Airways said it would cut domestic capacity - seats and flights - 6 percent to 8 percent this year and next.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2008 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
South Philly produce wholesalers meet this week to review a move from the crowded Food Distribution Center to a proposed $200 million Philadelphia Regional Produce Market, on a site developer Brian O'Neill controls at 6700 Essington Ave. near Philadelphia International Airport. "That's their plan. We don't know when we're going to break ground," said James Storey, head of Quaker City Produce Co. and a leader of the wholesalers. There's no deal yet, said John Estey, chairman of the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, which would become the market's landlord.
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