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Soft Drinks

NEWS
March 6, 2004
Before biting into why McDonald's recently decided to put its super sizes on a diet, let's all give a hearty "I'm lovin' it" to the fast food giant. This week, word leaked the chain was through with the big thing. Soon, say ciao to the Super Size (7 ounce, 610 calories) fries and Super Size (41 ounce, 410 calories) soft drinks at 13,000 McDonald's outlets in the United States. The changes are part of a nutritional transformation so radical, you wonder whether there soon will be ads showing Ronald McDonald doing Pilates.
NEWS
January 22, 2004
See why AAA fleeing So AAA Mid-Atlantic is moving to Delaware and the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce is going to "conduct an autopsy to learn what happened" (Jan. 17, "AAA set to leave Phila. for Delaware"). Philadelphia officials appear to be baffled that their package of targeted tax incentives didn't woo the company to stay here in Philadelphia. It's actually fairly straightforward. Companies, particularly small companies, often look at marginal tax rates and regulatory burdens when considering where to locate.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District's proposed ban on sales of sodas and other sweetened beverages to students is the latest and biggest evidence of a sea change in the cola wars in the region's schools. From Vineland to Lower Merion, school districts that once happily considered entering into exclusive contracts for beverage vending machines with Coke and Pepsi distributors have expressed doubts about such pacts. And soft drink companies say they are backing away from offering the deals because they are not worth the cost.
NEWS
January 15, 2004 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sodas are out. Juice is in. The Philadelphia School District plans to impose one of the nation's toughest beverage policies later this year, banning sodas, iced teas, and other sweetened drinks from all vending machines and school cafeterias. The new policy, which is expected to be officially approved Wednesday by the School Reform Commission, will allow only water, milk and 100 percent juice to be sold in the schools, effective June 30. Sales of "sports" drinks will be permitted in high school athletic areas.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
A new study has shown that America's teens are fatter than teens in 14 other nations. Meanwhile, the American Academy of Pediatrics has declared that sodas and sweetened drinks are contributing to childhood obesity, discouraging milk consumption, and causing cavities. Now, here's what may sound like a trick question: As a school district, what would you do? For an increasing number of districts nationwide, the answer is a no-brainer: Stock only milk, water and juice in cafeteria lines and vending machines.
NEWS
December 14, 2003 | By Oliver Prichard and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Jonathan P. Luna rose out of a Bronx public housing complex to become a successful federal prosecutor. Smart and magnetic, he seemed destined for even bigger things. To his friends and colleagues, Luna's life appeared to be as tidy as the suburban subdivision where he had settled down: At 38, he was a well-regarded assistant U.S. attorney in Baltimore, married to an obstetrician, and proud father of two young sons. "I just had such extraordinarily high expectations for Jonathan," said U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis, who presided over several of Luna's cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2003 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE PARENTS of R&B singer/actress Aaliyah ("Queen of the Damned") have reached a settlement in a negligence lawsuit over her death in a 2001 plane crash, family attorneys said. The chartered Cessna 402B carrying Aaliyah and eight others crashed shortly after takeoff on a flight from the Bahamas to the Miami suburb of Opa-Locka. Investigators believed the plane was 700 pounds overloaded. Attorneys for Aaliyah's parents, Diane and Michael Haughton, filed notice in federal court Thursday to say the case had been settled with an agreement to keep details confidential.
NEWS
September 5, 2003 | By David Montgomery
This week's $10 million "NFL Kickoff Live 2003, Presented by Pepsi Vanilla" suggests vast new horizons for the Mall in Washington. Now that the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior have determined that selling soft drinks and boosting football television ratings are excellent purposes for these historic acres, what else can be done with such an underused resource? The Potlatch Weyerhaeuser Pacific Lumber Activity Camp for Kids. So many elms, so little time. The ExxonMobil ChevronTexaco Monumental Core Oil Field.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Constar International Inc. shares lost 29 percent of their value yesterday after the Philadelphia producer of plastic bottles for food, soft drinks and other beverages reported a $4 million second-quarter loss. The stock closed at $6.29, down $2.61. The company was spun off from Crown Holdings Inc. in November at $12 a share. The company said results were poor, in part, because of price reductions agreed to in contract extensions with customers, such as PepsiCo Inc. Constar expected the lower prices to lead to higher volumes, which failed to materialize, because of unseasonably cool weather in May and June and other factors.
NEWS
July 22, 2003 | By Blondell Reynolds Brown
Congratulations to School District CEO Paul Vallas and the School Reform Commission for deciding that selling sodas to public school students is not in the children's best interest. By removing unhealthy drinks from vending machines, we will be taking a positive step in promoting healthy nutritional choices in our schools. The sale of commercially prepared food and drinks in schools can negatively affect children's diets, because many are high in calories, added sugars and fat, and low in nutrients.
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