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Soft Drinks

ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2003 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE PARENTS of R&B singer/actress Aaliyah ("Queen of the Damned") have reached a settlement in a negligence lawsuit over her death in a 2001 plane crash, family attorneys said. The chartered Cessna 402B carrying Aaliyah and eight others crashed shortly after takeoff on a flight from the Bahamas to the Miami suburb of Opa-Locka. Investigators believed the plane was 700 pounds overloaded. Attorneys for Aaliyah's parents, Diane and Michael Haughton, filed notice in federal court Thursday to say the case had been settled with an agreement to keep details confidential.
NEWS
September 5, 2003 | By David Montgomery
This week's $10 million "NFL Kickoff Live 2003, Presented by Pepsi Vanilla" suggests vast new horizons for the Mall in Washington. Now that the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior have determined that selling soft drinks and boosting football television ratings are excellent purposes for these historic acres, what else can be done with such an underused resource? The Potlatch Weyerhaeuser Pacific Lumber Activity Camp for Kids. So many elms, so little time. The ExxonMobil ChevronTexaco Monumental Core Oil Field.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Constar International Inc. shares lost 29 percent of their value yesterday after the Philadelphia producer of plastic bottles for food, soft drinks and other beverages reported a $4 million second-quarter loss. The stock closed at $6.29, down $2.61. The company was spun off from Crown Holdings Inc. in November at $12 a share. The company said results were poor, in part, because of price reductions agreed to in contract extensions with customers, such as PepsiCo Inc. Constar expected the lower prices to lead to higher volumes, which failed to materialize, because of unseasonably cool weather in May and June and other factors.
NEWS
July 22, 2003 | By Blondell Reynolds Brown
Congratulations to School District CEO Paul Vallas and the School Reform Commission for deciding that selling sodas to public school students is not in the children's best interest. By removing unhealthy drinks from vending machines, we will be taking a positive step in promoting healthy nutritional choices in our schools. The sale of commercially prepared food and drinks in schools can negatively affect children's diets, because many are high in calories, added sugars and fat, and low in nutrients.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after rejecting Coke's lucrative bid to be the sole beverage provider to Philadelphia schools, the financially strapped district is again scouting for an exclusive contract. District officials requested - and are reviewing - bids from several companies vying to become the exclusive supplier of 700 beverage vending machines in city schools. Among the bids under review are those from Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co. and the Pepsi Bottling Group. "We want to maximize the revenue from vending suppliers," said Kimberly A. Sangster, the district's chief procurement officer.
NEWS
February 11, 2003 | By Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are not quite ready to replace Billy Penn with a Pepsi bottle, but the folks in City Hall think there is money to be made hawking everything from soft drinks to computer software. Street administration officials said yesterday that they planned to hire a firm to look into whether Philadelphia should allow private companies to use the city's name to market their products. For a price, then, Dr Pepper could call itself the official drink of Philadelphia, or Nike could slap its name on any number of recreation centers.
NEWS
May 2, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Hospitalization of kids for obesity up dramatically Overweight children are being hospitalized at dramatically rising rates for diabetes, sleep apnea and other diseases that obesity causes or worsens. Obesity accounts for a tiny proportion of all child hospitalizations, scientists say. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported yesterday that "a disturbing increase" in the numbers has more than tripled hospital costs related to childhood obesity in the past 20 years, reaching $127 million.
SPORTS
April 29, 2001 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Carnegie Lake's windswept water rolling and swaying like California surf beneath them, Mary Obidinski and Catherine Humblet decided it was time to make some waves of their own. The finals of the Zurich Rowing World Cup - the first World Cup event ever in the United States - were eight events old at that point. And even though the field in this first post-Olympic year was as watered-down as the refreshment stands' soft drinks, no American had yet crossed the finish line first.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2001 | By Connie Langland and Evan Halper INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The school cola wars appear to be winding down. Hit by a barrage of criticism linking soda consumption to childhood obesity and other ailments, the Coca-Cola Co. said yesterday that it would seek to end the hard sell of soft drinks in schools. The company said it would offer healthier drinks as well as sodas in school vending machines; cover its giant logos on the machines; and advise bottlers against pushing exclusive contracts at schools. PepsiCo Inc. also is rethinking how it markets its products in schools, said Larry Jabbonsky, a PepsiCo spokesman.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2001 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. soft-drink sales were nearly flat last year, yet Cott Corp., the world's fourth-largest soda company, saw its U.S. sales rise 6 percent. Some analysts are confident that, by gaining market share, Cott can sustain such growth even if carbonated soft-drink sales do not return to the fast growth they experienced in the early 1990s. The Toronto-based company dominates the store-brand beverage market in the United States with 60 percent of the market, and counts Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Safeway Inc. and other large U.S. retailers among its customers.
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