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BUSINESS
January 29, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
BioClinica Inc. is a bit unusual these days in the region's pharmaceutical industry. It is hiring. The company creates computer software to read and measure images, such as brain scans of tumors, and to digest the huge amounts of data related to clinical studies that drug companies sponsor. The company had 522 employees at the end of 2011 and hopes to add 55 by year's end, with most of the current job listings pegged for headquarters in Newtown, Bucks County, and its site in Audubon, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yardley software-maker Prophet 21 Inc. said yesterday it was being acquired by Activant Solutions Inc., an Austin, Texas-based business-to-business software firm, for $215 million. Prophet 21 makes e-commerce software for distributors in industries including ones dealing in fasteners, electrical, medical and plumbing. It employs about 530, two-thirds of them in Yardley. The firm is on pace to do $85 million in sales this year, Prophet 21 chief executive officer Chuck Boyle said.
NEWS
May 12, 2010
GSI Commerce Inc., King of Prussia, said Wednesday it acquired VendorNet, a Boynton Beach, Fla., provider of software to manage e-commerce supply-chain solutions, such as inventory management. VendorNet's clients include the Franklin Mint, Neiman Marcus, David's Bridal, Spiegel, Nine West and Lands' End. The purchase price was not disclosed, but privately held VendorNet has 32 employees, a GSI Commerce spokeswoman said. GSI operates websites for retailers, manufacturers and other companies.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Army National Guard has thousands of computers, terminals and printers gathering dust in warehouses nationwide because it was slow to buy the software - the "electronic brains" - needed to make the computer systems work, congressional investigators said yesterday. The computer gear, which cost $17.5 million, has sat unused for a year - and will sit sealed in crates for up to two more years - before all the software is available, investigators told the House Energy and Commerce Committee's oversight and investigations subcommittee.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Computer buffs: The Chester County Library in Exton just spent $5,000 on all sorts of software, ranging from "Word Perfect" to the ever-popular "Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego. " Check it out. Literally. For the last four years, the library has operated a computer center for patrons and had an assortment of programs that could be used in the building's computer center. But two weeks ago, a lending program for software was begun. Now, software disks can be checked out a week at a time, just like books.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Acknowledging the apparent necessity for a computer system to help with everything from class scheduling to keeping alumni records, the Abington school board has delayed a decision to purchase a software system for computers they have not yet purchased. The district had suggested purchasing the software first because prices on computers are falling. After more than two hours of sometimes heated questioning of the $95,790 proposal from software company Howard Guess & Associates, the board voted 8-1 to table the issue Tuesday night.
LIVING
December 18, 1995 | By John J. Fried and William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It's beginning to look a lot like . . . the last few shopping days before Christmas. And Hanukkah has arrived. If you still haven't figured out what to get all the computer users clogging that worn-out sliver of notebook paper you call a shopping list, don't panic! There's still time to make it a jolly, holly software holiday. And if you're among the millions of new computer owners or plan to give a new machine as a family present, you'll want plenty of software at hand to satisfy the "let-me-try, let-me-try" cries that will ring in your ears.
NEWS
September 14, 2011
Scala, an Exton software developer, said today it appointed Tom Nix as chief executive officer, effective Nov. 1. Nix, now a company vice president, will succeed Gerard Bucas, who is retiring after nine years as CEO. Scala provides software for digital signs used on billboards, in doctors' offices and in advertising management.    -Paul Schweizer
BUSINESS
May 4, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University's mandate that every student have a Macintosh computer is paying off in an unexpected form - cash - for 22 students and faculty members, and for the university. The 22 have earned $10,000 in royalties on educational software that they developed for use at Drexel and that is now being sold nationwide by Kinko's Copies, a national chain of photocopying stores. The money will be split between the university and the individuals, with $6,000 going to Drexel and $4,000 to be shared by the 22 software developers.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1996 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A software-installation error wreaked havoc yesterday with Bell Atlantic Corp.'s directory-assistance service across its local-phone territory, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, four other mid-Atlantic states and the District of Columbia. The problem affected hundreds of thousands of customers who were unable to get a phone number or had to wait a long time for one. Bell Atlantic spokesman Eric W. Rabe said the problem appeared to have been created over the weekend by human error during a routine software upgrade.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 29, 2015
They started at opposite ends of the region, in far suburbs. But the demands of hiring new tech talent have converged in Center City Philadelphia, for both Linode , a Galloway Township Internet cloud-hosting provider, and iPipeline , an Exton insurance-software maker. Each is opening new offices downtown to house young software professionals who would rather avoid long rides to their outer-county headquarters. Both are basing their urban tech workers in skylit, repurposed low-rise buildings - brick or stone walls, wood floors, fancy windows - instead of the high-rent (by Philadelphia standards)
BUSINESS
December 7, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
It's the most wonderful time of the year for Gizmo Guy. He gets to play not-so-secret Santa, whispering gadget ideas for the loved ones on your shopping list. This week, he's dreaming of red hot (and cool) tech "tools" that will make the holidays brighter. Next week, he'll yammer on with some of the best software you can play on the thingamajigs. Virtually there. For entertainment, education, and armchair traveling, virtual-reality hardware and software could be the next big thing.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
An FBI data expert told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that he found a prodigious number of deleted file fragments on accused stalker John Hart's computers, including two Internet programs that enable a user to disguise the computer's identity. Michael Irvin testified that the websites - "Spoof Your IP Address" and "Spoofing Demystified" - offer software that would have let Hart cloak his computer during Internet searches for private information about CBS3 newscaster Erika von Tiehl. Spoofing is the term for making a computer's unique Internet Protocol (IP)
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
RJMetrics is adding in excess of a third more space to its offices at Center City's Widener Building, according to PernaFrederick Commercial Real Estate, which represented the software startup in the expansion. The company will now occupy more than 21,500 square feet on the fourth and 15th floors of the 18-story building at One South Penn Square, PernaFrederick said in a release Tuesday. RJMetrics, which specializes in data infrastructure and analytics software, has operated out of the building since early 2014, PernaFrederick said.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., said Friday it agreed to buy Gecko Health Innovations Inc., a privately-held company that makes software and other products to remind patients to take their respiratory medicine. A Teva spokeswoman declined to reveal the price of the acquisition of the Cambridge, Mass. company. Through the deal, Teva will get Gecko's CareTRxTM, which is a hardware and software product designed to keep track of patient use of inhalers. People suffering from asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often use an inhaler to help them breath more easily.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA Regional Rail trains were delayed Thursday afternoon by 45 to 60 minutes following a software failure in SEPTA's control center. Trains throughout the regional network were affected, starting at about 1:20 p.m., SEPTA spokesman Manuel Smith said. The software was essential for controlling rail interlockings and passenger announcements, Smith said, and all trains were halted. The software issues "were resolved at 1:40 p.m. and they were able to get railroad running again," Smith said.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maker Brad Litwin, 59, makes kinetic sculptures in his East Oak Lane studio, including a line he calls MechaniCards - intricately laser-cut paper made into tiny, greeting-generating machines. They're sold online, at MechaniCards.com, and at museum stores, including those of the Princeton Art Museum and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His start Litwin can't really pinpoint it: He's worked as an engineer, animator, musician, and artist. "In 2010, I was sitting in my studio and looking at some boxes I had on the shelf, CD mailers actually . . .. I was thinking it'd be neat to have a machine inside one of those.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PTC , a Needham, Mass., software conglomerate that has focused on the Internet of Things - sensors and software that help machines share data so people don't have to - said Tuesday it had agreed to buy Wayne-based ColdLight Solutions L.L.C. and its Neuron data-analytics software platform for $105 million. The deal follows PTC's 2014 purchase of Exton-based ThingWorx , which helps corporate clients process user data from "smart connected products" for $112 million, plus a bonus if sales rise.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When newly developed software works - when clients start buying it - the talk gets big fast: "We are changing the way code is built," says Chris Gali, cofounder of Enterprise Cloudworks , from the conference room past the pool table in his high-rise offices at 1818 Market St. "Right now, we are 52 people. By the end of the year, we will be 75. My belief is that in two and a half years, we'll be 350, right here on Market Street, Philadelphia," says Jim Rourke, the firm's president.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAP SE, the German-based business-software company with North American headquarters in Newtown Square, says it will cut 2,200 of its 74,400 worldwide jobs as it pushes cloud-based and in-memory-database services to offset the drop in sales growth for enterprise software systems. But the company, which employs 2,500 in Newtown Square, is still hiring. SAP had 50,000 employees in 2010 and about 66,000 by the end of 2013; head count has risen since then. "We're looking for people who can contribute to growth," and who have "networks" of business contacts to whom they can sell SAP services, spokesman Andy Kendzie said.
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