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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The owner of the Pennco Tech computer-training school in Bristol Township hopes that a recent lawsuit, which alleges that his company duplicated copyright-protected software, soon will be settled out of court. John Hobyak, who started the vocational and trade school in 1973, said Thursday that he began cooperating with those bringing the action against Pennco Tech when he became aware of the suit, filed in federal court in Philadelphia on April 3. "As soon as I became aware of the charges, I began working voluntarily to reach an agreement outside of the courtroom," Hobyak said.
LIVING
March 22, 1987 | By Allan S. Joffe, Special to The Inquirer
How do you get smart? How do you find sources of information on price, availability and capability of computer software? The capability question is best handled by plain talk with friends who have been through the mill. This is one way to save a bundle: learning by viewing a demonstration of their software and taking heed of their tales of woe. Also, any seminars offering to demonstrate the programs in which you are interested would be well-worth attending. The question of price in the current marketplace is easily handled by a subscription to the Computer Shopper.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SAP AG, the German business-software company that has its American headquarters in Newtown Square, said yesterday that its first-quarter 2006 sales increased 22 percent to $634 million from $521 million in the first quarter of 2005. All dollar figures are calculated based on the average euro-to-dollar currency exchange rate for 2005. SAP's profit was $338.4 million, or $1.09 a share, an 11 percent increase over the corresponding quarter in 2005, when profit was $304.8 million, or 98 cents a share.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1998 | By Kent Steinriede, FOR THE INQUIRER
Call the Domino's on South Street with an order for a large pepperoni pizza with olives and a chain reaction begins. Not only does a cook cover a disc of dough with tomato sauce, cheese and the toppings and slide it into the oven, but the shop operator has to reorder more of whatever it took to make that pizza from Domino's Jessup, Md., distribution center. Domino's Pizza Inc., the franchiser based in Ann Arbor, Mich., is increasingly relying on a small Fort Washington software firm to help it decide how much sausage, cheese, dough and pizza boxes its distribution centers should order from its suppliers.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Systems & Computer Technology Corp. says boldly that none of its competitors can match the features of its new Banner computer software for keeping university student records. "We think it'll set a new standard for institutions to judge software," said Susan Sheraton, senior director of software product marketing for the Malvern company, which provides software and computer-systems management for universities and government bodies. In announcing the Banner software on Tuesday, SCT said it had already signed its first purchaser, the 16-member West Virginia Network for Educational Telecomputing in Morgantown, W. Va. The announcement is one more indication that SCT may finally be seeing light at the end of a three-year-long tunnel, Rodney L. Everhart, vice president for finance and administration, said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Chester County enterprise that develops software for financial institutions has announced a $3.2 million expansion project expected to add 65 jobs in the next three years. Automated Financial Systems Inc. (AFS) and its affiliate, Littlewood, Shain & Co., plan to start construction next spring of a 35,000-square-foot building on 4.2 acres adjacent to their offices at 123 Summit Dr. AFS has developed software for such tasks as processing loan applications and accounting for loan payments.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1988 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
Digital's newest software system won't turn you into a great novelist, but it could prevent you from sounding like a fool. The VAX Grammar Checker, billed as the world's first software to corrects documents that analyzes sentence structure, will spot those embarrassing little flaws that make you wince when you re-read old business correspondence. You know, the mistakes that wind up tacked to the bulletin board and circled in red, or highlighted in the company newsletter. The program, which costs about $200 and can be used only on Digital computer systems, was developed by linguistic experts at Houghton Mifflin, the publishing company.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reality Online Inc. is a small software company with big plans for cashing in on the personal-finance revolution that is already sweeping the United States and, in Reality's vision, is soon to touch the rest of the world. Two parallel forces - the aging of the baby boomers and the proliferation of personal computers in homes - are merging, and the King of Prussia company believes this merger will translate into a powerful demand for its products. Those boomers are less concerned with buying the latest BMW and more concerned with their retirement and putting the children through college, said Douglas A. Alexander, Reality's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1997 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you own a personal computer and have access to the World Wide Web, you know how handy it is to research travel information, including fairly reliable data on airline fares. People already planning trips this way are part of what some forecasters say is a big growth business. Jupiter Communications, a New York market-research firm, estimates that the amount spent electronically for business and leisure travel worldwide will grow from $827 million this year to almost $9 billion in five years.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2001 | By Claire Furia Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
At first glance, a construction site and the Internet may not seem to have a lot in common. But from walkie-talkies to Web-enabled cellular phones, construction workers and managers use wireless technology on the job every day. That is why a small Montgomery County firm has targeted the construction industry for its software that links workers on-site to their companies' home offices. Software developed by Airput Inc., Norristown, allows construction managers to file employee time sheets and other information onto online databases using a cell phone.
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