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BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get a giant creature named after you? The world's largest dinosaur, Dreadnoughtus schrani - Schran's Fearless - honors Adam Schran , founder of a Philadelphia software firm, who looks and sounds as if he is still a student at brainy Haverford College, where he graduated in 1998. Schran's name was pinned on by the dinosaur's discoverer, the rugged, precise scholar Schran calls "Dr. Ken. " That would be Drexel paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara , whose team found fossil bones of the 65-ton creature in Argentina's barren Patagonia region, shipped them home to Philly, and put scholars to work decoding them in his top-floor lab at Papadakis Hall.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former supermarket employee was arrested in Radnor on Friday for allegedly "upskirting" - using a cellphone to surreptitiously video unsuspecting women - in another grocery store. Brian Bailey, 52, of the 300 block of West Johnson Street, was arrested and is being held in Montgomery County on a probation violation for a similar crime, said Lt. Andy Block of the Radnor police. Bailey is charged with two counts of invasion of privacy, disorderly conduct, and harassment, according to Block.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
The morning of July 17, Dîner en Blanc opened final Web registration for those wishing to attend its annual pop-up picnic in Philadelphia on Aug. 21. About 10,000 people on a waiting list attempted to log in - and swiftly crashed Dîner en Blanc's registration system, based at international headquarters in Montreal. This was not the first time that the volunteer-run organization (DEB) has encountered online registration glitches over its now third year in Philadelphia. The event itself - whose location is disclosed only moments before its start - has run smoothly.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
R ANDY RAYESS and Pratham Mittal, both 23, are Penn grads and co-founders of VenturePact, a Center City firm that provides clients with outsourced software development. The firm started in fall 2012 building software services, and evolved into a marketplace last year. I spoke with Rayess, who lives in Old City. Q: How did you come up with the idea for VenturePact? A: We worked at startups and realized they couldn't build software and were always looking for developers.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to an in-kind grant from Siemens valued at $750 million, Pennsylvania State University's Great Valley campus in Malvern will offer hands-on experience to its first undergraduate students next month. The grant from Siemens will provide engineering and manufacturing software to nine Penn State campuses, including Great Valley, which is launching a bachelor's degree in engineering program. Students will have access to the same software used by companies to develop and manufacture products.
NEWS
June 5, 2014
E RIC KING, 30, of Northern Liberties, is founder and CEO of Grand Round Table, a startup on 3rd Street near Market that develops software to help doctors make complicated diagnoses. GRT, which launched in 2012, is getting the correct diagnoses about 70 percent of the time. The company, which was part of the first DreamIt Health accelerator in 2013, has three full-time employees and has raised $110,000 from the Wharton Venture Initiation Program and Ben Franklin Technology Partners.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
When Leonard Tau's father opened his dental practice in New York in 1971, attracting business required very little effort. "My dad put a shingle up, and the patients just came," Tau said. By the time Tau started his practice in Northeast Philadelphia in 2007, the Internet had made life anything but smile-worthy for dentists. What are now more than 100 websites that collect and republish consumer reviews (Yelp, Angie's List, etc.) can turn a patient's miserable experience with a root canal into a reputation nightmare for a dentist.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
How much does "pay-to-play" contracting cost the public? About $45 million, in one episode at the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, according to a recent analysis of a contract for computer software. The analysis concluded that the turnpike commission paid far too much and received far too little when it bought a software system from Ciber Inc., of Greenwood Village, Colo., whose former vice president has been charged by state prosecutors with giving gifts to turnpike officials to win contracts.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Metro Bank P.L.C. , the fast-growing, 25-branch British bank started by Commerce Bancorp founder Vernon Hill , has raised $637 million (385 million UK pounds) from past investors. Contributors include hedge funds SAC Capital Advisors , headed by Steve Cohen , and Moore Capital Management L.L.C. , both of New York. Also, mutual fund managers Fidelity Investments and Wellington Management Co. , whose clients include Vanguard Group , and real estate investors Reuben Brothers , based in Switzerland, and Richard LeFrak , chairman of his namesake New York company.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Venture capitalists invested $420.3 million in Philadelphia-area companies last year, up 1.2 percent from the year before, according to the MoneyTree Report by PricewaterhouseCoopers L.L.P. and the National Venture Capital Association. The report, released Friday and based on data from Thomson Reuters, also showed that venture capitalists nationally invested $29.4 billion in 3,995 deals, a 7 percent increase in dollars and a 4 percent increase in deals. Locally, the number of companies receiving venture capital equity investments increased 9.9 percent to 122 from 111. In the fourth quarter, 34 Philadelphia-area companies received $81.6 million in investments.
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