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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2012 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR A WHILE there, it seemed like serious "hi-fi" sound was going down for the count. Digital music players, stressing cutes and convenience, have made bulkier - but better-sounding - CD players and discs seem old-school. Low-fi, DIY basement recordists suggest it's cool to cut corners on miking and studio acoustics, minor details that add so much warmth, realism and connection between music maker and listener. And don't get me started about the chilly artificiality of the whole electronica/dance pop scene.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeremy Bloom - former Olympic skier, Philadelphia Eagle, and nonprofit-foundation boss - has been raising millions for his next career: replacing corporate ad-purchase professionals with automatic ad-view and spend-tracking software. Bloom's company, Integrate, said this week that it has raised $11 million from Comcast Ventures, cable-TV mogul John Malone's Liberty Global, and the Colorado-based Foundry Group. Foundry also invested $4.2 million in 2010. Integrate says it helps advertisers mine today's complex media markets - in which Americans are split into many thousands of micro-audiences - by sorting the enormous piles of our browsing and shopping data collected by websites, media companies, and merchants and then using it to rank viewership and purchases that follow consumer exposure to ads. The system replaces people with software.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
BioClinica Inc. is a bit unusual these days in the region's pharmaceutical industry. It is hiring. The company creates computer software to read and measure images, such as brain scans of tumors, and to digest the huge amounts of data related to clinical studies that drug companies sponsor. The company had 522 employees at the end of 2011 and hopes to add 55 by year's end, with most of the current job listings pegged for headquarters in Newtown, Bucks County, and its site in Audubon, Montgomery County.
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Aharon Wasserman was frustrated by the sheaves of papers he received every night. As deputy field director in the Georgia office of Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign, the Cumberland County, N.J., native's job was to collate daily canvassing reports, crunching data on issues such as who got registered and who was likely to vote. One evening, the 21-year-old Rutgers University junior, who had taken a leave to join the campaign, grabbed another young staff member, Justin Lewis, "who wasn't so good at knocking on doors, but was pretty good at programming," Wasserman recalled recently.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012
In the Region GMH to develop student housing Real estate developer GMH Capital Partners , of Newtown Square, said it acquired 23 acres of land near the campus of Salisbury University in Salisbury, Md., where it expects to build housing for 696 students. The company also has an option to acquire an adjacent 27 acres for future development. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. - Inquirer staff Google in online safety push Google Inc. said it was launching an advertising campaign to inform consumers about online safety.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - More than five years after New Jersey passed a law to start tracking prescription drug use, the state will launch a database to monitor use of dangerous drugs with the intent of helping doctors spot abusers more quickly and authorities stop drug dealers. The database, which has been collecting information since Sept. 1, contains more than four million prescriptions. Starting this month, doctors and pharmacies, including mail-order operations, can access detailed patient information on prescriptions for painkillers, steroids, sedatives, and stimulants.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2011
VIDEO GAME systems are generating remarkable sales this holiday season. Microsoft's Xbox 360 is leading the pack (a million units sold just over the Black Friday weekend), while Sony and Nintendo also report higher than expected figures. Clearly driving the boom? A terrific bunch of new software titles for hard-core gamers and casuals alike. BLOWS UP REAL GOOD: Fresh first-person shooters are proving especially hot, selling staggering numbers (8 million to 10 million) in little more than a month.
NEWS
December 5, 2011
Delay in case of bomb suspect NEW YORK - Prosecutors and a defense lawyer agreed to delay having a grand jury weigh in on a terrorism case against a man accused of assembling a homemade bomb to blow up targets ranging from police cars to post offices, his attorney said. Jose Pimentel had been scheduled to learn Monday whether he had been indicted, but defense lawyer Lori Cohen said a deadline would be waived for about a month. "Both parties agree that this is not the case to rush into the grand jury on," she said in an e-mail.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oracle Corp. boss Larry Ellison didn't used to like this cloud-computing thing. He expected Oracle would keep selling big business software systems, updates, and maintenance onto client servers, instead of letting customers move their secure data functions online to the world computing cloud. In a famous 2008 investor conference (you can watch it on YouTube), Ellison called the cloud-computing idea "gibberish" and "crap" and "idiocy. " But on Monday, Oracle agreed to pay $1.5 billion for RightNow Technologies Inc. , a Bozeman, Mont., firm that makes cloud-based customer-management software in competition with Newtown Square-based SAP Americas , Oracle's rival.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Dennis M. Ritchie, 70, who helped shape the modern digital era by creating software tools that power everything from search engines such as Google to smartphones, was found dead Wednesday at his home in Berkeley Heights, N.J. Mr. Ritchie, who lived alone, had been in frail health in recent years after treatment for prostate cancer and heart disease, said his brother Bill. In the late 1960s and early '70s, working at Bell Labs, Mr. Ritchie made a pair of lasting contributions to computer science.
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