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NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By John G. Devine, Special to The Inquirer
Six months after a truck spilled 4,000 gallons of kerosene along Route 70 in Medford, the cleanup is finally complete. Trucks arrived at the site between Chairville and Eayrestown Roads early Thursday morning to begin moving more than 300 tons of kerosene-soaked soil. The soil had been excavated from the south side of Route 70 in February to prevent groundwater contamination, but the contaminated soil was deposited on the north side of the road about 100 feet from the home of Walter and Bettie Cliver.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The dirt that's too dirty for your backyard may be just fine for the top of a landfill, the base of a highway, or the shoulder of a road. Just mix it in the right proportion, and the contaminated soil found in Burlington Township can be rendered relatively harmless and put to use elsewhere in Burlington County. The state Department of Environmental Protection revealed two weeks ago that contaminated soil had been found in two housing developments built on a former apple orchard that used arsenic, lead, DDT and other dangerous chemicals.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | By John G. Devine, Special to The Inquirer
What do you do when someone dumps 300 tons of kerosene-soaked soil about 100 feet from your home? If you are Walter and Bettie Cliver of Medford Township, you wait a few weeks to see if the people who dumped it there intend to remove it. Then you start calling the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). In February, 300 tons of kerosene-soaked soil were excavated from the south side of a 300-yard stretch of Route 70 between Chairville and Eayrestown Roads after a truck spilled more than 4,000 gallons of kerosene onto the highway.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
A crowd of about 75 residents urged the Winslow Township Committee last night to deny a soil-extraction application that would expand a mining operation in the township. The application, filed by George F. Pettinos Inc., requested approval to mine an additional 60 acres. The company filed for the expansion, to be made in three phases, to remove sand used to produce concrete and asphalt, said Curt Mitchell, the vice president of production for Pettinos. The proposal requests approval so the company can dig 65 feet below the natural surface at a plot near the corner of Williamstown-New Freedom Road and Williamstown-New Brooklyn Road.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Two different companies applying for the right to mine soil from sites in Winslow Township are scheduled to present their controversial cases in front of the Township Committee at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. The public hearing, which will be conducted at the Winslow Township Municipal Building, also will be attended by a strong township environmental group and angry residents who don't want to see any more soil-mining holes in the township. Both applications were referred back to the Township Committee by a Camden County Superior Court judge.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | By David M. Krakow, Special to The Inquirer
A $225,000 contract dispute may delay soil and groundwater testing of the Ellis toxic-waste site on Sharp Road in Evesham, a state official said last night. Frank Richardson, a site manager with the state Department of Environmental Protection, said testing at the defunct drum-recycling operation, which was scheduled to begin in late January or early February, could be pushed back to the late spring. Roy F. Weston Inc. of West Chester, Pa., conducted the first phase of tests for the DEP in 1987.
LIVING
March 1, 1987 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
It is the first day of March, and reluctant gardeners can already be overheard muttering that they only have a couple of months of grace before they have to start mowing the lawn. On the other hand, eager gardeners, who have been longing to be out with the spade and the hoe since they put the tools away last fall, face the month when spring arrives with boundless enthusiasm; the challenge is to keep them from pushing ahead too quickly. The gardening partner, for example, is wont to dash out as soon as the soil thaws and start digging over the vegetable garden.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey environmental officials said yesterday that they would send 100 drums of radon-contaminated soil to Tennessee in a pilot project that might lead to the disposal of 15,000 drums of the soil now being stored in North Jersey. The plan calls for sending the drums to Oak Ridge, Tenn., where the soil will be mixed with radioactive dirt at a facility licensed to handle radioactive waste. From there, the tainted soil will be sent to one of three federally licensed radioactive-waste disposal sites in the country.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
State environmental officials, facing a court order to remove drums of radon-tainted soil from Essex County, said yesterday that they would temporarily store the 15,000 drums from Essex and Hudson Counties at a state- owned site near Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Ocean County. The decision by Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Richard Dewling was attacked almost immediately by legislators from the Ocean County area. Several called on Dewling to resign. The announcement was the latest development in the two-year search by the DEP to find a final disposal site for the radon-contaminated soil, which was excavated from homes in Montclair, Glen Ridge and West Orange and is now stored in Montclair and Kearny.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Starting next month, soil contaminated by asbestos and other pollutants is to be excavated and hauled away from a 112-acre section of Valley Forge National Historical Park that has been closed for the last 15 years. The restoration of the site is to be completed by the summer of 2014, but a date for a public opening is uncertain, Donna Davies, manager of the project for Valley Forge Park, said in Friday. Since the autumn of 2012, work has included surveying, archaeological clearance, and soil sampling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2016
Water, weed, and mulch. Weeds are competition for available soil moisture and nutrients, and they come out a lot easier after rain or watering. Get rid of them, and then cover the naked soil with mulch to keep moisture in and new weed seeds from sprouting. If weeds have already gone to seed, don't put them in the compost bin, or you'll have three more generations of weeds growing out of it. Revel in tomatoes. This is certainly the week for it. This is the time of year when I eat nothing but toasted tomato and cheese sandwiches for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
There are nearly 5,000 school gardens across the United States, living lessons that sprout on rooftops and lawns, in greenhouses and classrooms. Of the 133 in Pennsylvania, one of the more fruitful flourishes in a former courtyard at Bucks County's Bristol Middle-High School, where 4,000 plants occupy 30,000 neatly-tended square feet. A small farm, really. In four years, the garden has grown to 21 raised beds, with an herb wall, a pond graced by a waterfall, a cistern, arbors, tree-shaded picnic benches, and a new vermiculture system in which worms turn food waste into nutrient-rich compost.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Vance Lehmkuhl, Staff Writer
THINK YOU NEED animal waste to grow strong, healthy vegetables? Naw, that's just a load of BS. In fact, the next logical step after a plant-based diet may be plant-based plants. Flying under the radar, vegan organic or "veganic" growing got a publicity boost a few months back when South Philly's Metropolis Farms became the first vegan-certified farm in the United States. (For a visit to Metropolis and interview with Jack Griffin see philly.com/veganic.) Now people are curious about this animal-free practice with the newfangled name but a long and venerable history.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Virginia A. Smith, For The Inquirer
The garden in May makes David Jensen's heart soar, especially the last two weeks, for all the floral delights popping to life around this time. Irises and daffodils are favorites, but like most gardeners, his list is way longer. "You could spend your annual vacation in the garden during those two weeks," says this former Moorestown resident and globe-trotting Comcast executive, who just might do that someday. First, he wants to share the story of his splendid South Jersey garden in a new book, The Garden Interior: A Year of Inspired Beauty (Morgan James Publishing, $17.95)
NEWS
April 15, 2016 | By Bernard Fernandez, CORRESPONDENT
ON SATURDAY night, two-time former IBF cruiserweight champion Steve "USS" Cunningham gets to come home again. In a way, he's actually doing it twice. At the relatively advanced age of 39, Cunningham (28-7-1, 13 KOs), the former bosun's mate from Southwest Philadelphia, challenges 10-years-younger WBO cruiserweight titlist (25-0, 16 KOs) Krzysztof Glowacki, of Poland, at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. It is one of three bouts to be televised via Premier Boxing Champions on NBC. The others are Marcus Browne (17-0, 13 KOs)
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