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NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By John G. Devine, Special to The Inquirer
Six months after a truck spilled 4,000 gallons of kerosene along Route 70 in Medford, the cleanup is finally complete. Trucks arrived at the site between Chairville and Eayrestown Roads early Thursday morning to begin moving more than 300 tons of kerosene-soaked soil. The soil had been excavated from the south side of Route 70 in February to prevent groundwater contamination, but the contaminated soil was deposited on the north side of the road about 100 feet from the home of Walter and Bettie Cliver.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The dirt that's too dirty for your backyard may be just fine for the top of a landfill, the base of a highway, or the shoulder of a road. Just mix it in the right proportion, and the contaminated soil found in Burlington Township can be rendered relatively harmless and put to use elsewhere in Burlington County. The state Department of Environmental Protection revealed two weeks ago that contaminated soil had been found in two housing developments built on a former apple orchard that used arsenic, lead, DDT and other dangerous chemicals.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | By John G. Devine, Special to The Inquirer
What do you do when someone dumps 300 tons of kerosene-soaked soil about 100 feet from your home? If you are Walter and Bettie Cliver of Medford Township, you wait a few weeks to see if the people who dumped it there intend to remove it. Then you start calling the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). In February, 300 tons of kerosene-soaked soil were excavated from the south side of a 300-yard stretch of Route 70 between Chairville and Eayrestown Roads after a truck spilled more than 4,000 gallons of kerosene onto the highway.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
A crowd of about 75 residents urged the Winslow Township Committee last night to deny a soil-extraction application that would expand a mining operation in the township. The application, filed by George F. Pettinos Inc., requested approval to mine an additional 60 acres. The company filed for the expansion, to be made in three phases, to remove sand used to produce concrete and asphalt, said Curt Mitchell, the vice president of production for Pettinos. The proposal requests approval so the company can dig 65 feet below the natural surface at a plot near the corner of Williamstown-New Freedom Road and Williamstown-New Brooklyn Road.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Two different companies applying for the right to mine soil from sites in Winslow Township are scheduled to present their controversial cases in front of the Township Committee at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. The public hearing, which will be conducted at the Winslow Township Municipal Building, also will be attended by a strong township environmental group and angry residents who don't want to see any more soil-mining holes in the township. Both applications were referred back to the Township Committee by a Camden County Superior Court judge.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | By David M. Krakow, Special to The Inquirer
A $225,000 contract dispute may delay soil and groundwater testing of the Ellis toxic-waste site on Sharp Road in Evesham, a state official said last night. Frank Richardson, a site manager with the state Department of Environmental Protection, said testing at the defunct drum-recycling operation, which was scheduled to begin in late January or early February, could be pushed back to the late spring. Roy F. Weston Inc. of West Chester, Pa., conducted the first phase of tests for the DEP in 1987.
LIVING
March 1, 1987 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
It is the first day of March, and reluctant gardeners can already be overheard muttering that they only have a couple of months of grace before they have to start mowing the lawn. On the other hand, eager gardeners, who have been longing to be out with the spade and the hoe since they put the tools away last fall, face the month when spring arrives with boundless enthusiasm; the challenge is to keep them from pushing ahead too quickly. The gardening partner, for example, is wont to dash out as soon as the soil thaws and start digging over the vegetable garden.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey environmental officials said yesterday that they would send 100 drums of radon-contaminated soil to Tennessee in a pilot project that might lead to the disposal of 15,000 drums of the soil now being stored in North Jersey. The plan calls for sending the drums to Oak Ridge, Tenn., where the soil will be mixed with radioactive dirt at a facility licensed to handle radioactive waste. From there, the tainted soil will be sent to one of three federally licensed radioactive-waste disposal sites in the country.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
State environmental officials, facing a court order to remove drums of radon-tainted soil from Essex County, said yesterday that they would temporarily store the 15,000 drums from Essex and Hudson Counties at a state- owned site near Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Ocean County. The decision by Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Richard Dewling was attacked almost immediately by legislators from the Ocean County area. Several called on Dewling to resign. The announcement was the latest development in the two-year search by the DEP to find a final disposal site for the radon-contaminated soil, which was excavated from homes in Montclair, Glen Ridge and West Orange and is now stored in Montclair and Kearny.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Starting next month, soil contaminated by asbestos and other pollutants is to be excavated and hauled away from a 112-acre section of Valley Forge National Historical Park that has been closed for the last 15 years. The restoration of the site is to be completed by the summer of 2014, but a date for a public opening is uncertain, Donna Davies, manager of the project for Valley Forge Park, said in Friday. Since the autumn of 2012, work has included surveying, archaeological clearance, and soil sampling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Clean up. With typical Philadelphia capriciousness, hot dry weather gives way to hot wet tropical monsoons, and our gardens respond by both thriving and taking a beating. Don't be afraid to do some manicuring: foliage from tulip and daffodil bulbs is too ugly to bear; a few more hosta leaves burn out every time it tops 90 degrees; dead azalea blossoms still cling to the bushes. You have my permission to get rid of anything you don't like the looks of. But use the proper tools: handpicking for fine work, pruners for anything up to a half-inch in diameter, loppers up to an inch, and a saw for anything bigger.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Pay attention to the weather forecast. This is the week we walk the line between frost and not-frost. In the city, we've already gotten the all-clear, but out in the 'burbs . . . hold off on planting transplants of tomatoes, peppers, and basil until the nighttime temps are in the mid-50s. (Refer to last week's column for best ways to test soil warmth.) Lots of people have jumped the gun on this, and the results are not pretty. In the meantime, feel free to plant seeds of any of your warm-season vegetables such as beans, squash, and cukes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, Inquirer Columnist
Clean out your old seed packets. Some seeds lose potency quickly (corn and spinach,) while others last for thousands of years (ask the dead pharaohs!). You want to get rid of anything older than five years; do this test to see whether others are still viable: Take 10 seeds from a pack, wrap them in a squeezed-out wet paper towel, and put them in a plastic bag, someplace warm but not hot. (We once made school kids wear them as necklaces, and they sprouted in a week; mine, of course, came up in three days!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
  Survey your domain. What got beaten down by the winter, or broken by the late snow? Take a good look at what's going on before you start chopping and pruning. Are you finding the 3 D's - dead, diseased, damaged? Get out your pruners and start to cut away the obviously diseased and damaged stuff, but hold back on what looks dead. Chances are good that a few more weeks of warm weather will cause buds to pop out on branches you thought were goners. If you feel you must prune, cut back a little at a time until you hit green wood.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient, highly porous form of charcoal is being touted as a godsend for soil health and fertility - transforming farms, home gardens, and urban and suburban landscapes. It might even combat climate change. Any wonder they're calling biochar a "miracle product"? "It's important not to promise too much, but this is mind-popping stuff," says Dale Hendricks, owner of Green Light Plants, a wholesale organic nursery in Landenberg, Chester County, who talks up biochar to public gardens and local garden clubs, and cooks his own in barrels, kilns, and a wood stove.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Repot water-stressed, container-grown plants. We're heading into what's usually the hottest part of the summer, so now is the time to repot any pot-bound plants that are drying out too quickly. You can tell if this is going on when leaves wilt frequently, roots creep out the drain holes, or the plant actually pushes up out of the container. You can reuse the same container as long as you first loosen the roots and trim one to two inches all around the root mass. Put an inch or two of fresh soil in the bottom of the container, set the plant on top of this layer, and use more soil to fill in around the sides of the root mass.
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