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Solar System

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NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Jennifer A. Nagorka, Dallas Morning News Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
If there is one thing that scientists have learned to expect from the Voyager missions' 12-year odyssey, it has been the unexpected, as the striking pictures sent back from the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune generated surprise after surprise. Those large gaseous planets have conformed to the basic outlines scientists had drawn from previous observations, but Voyager pictures of their moons and rings provided dramatic detail. Photos of Jupiter's moon Io, for example, spotted nine active volcanoes on its surface, including one that spewed sulfur-laden ash over an area four- fifths the size of Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1991 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
The stars come out at the Franklin Institute this holiday weekend for the premiere of Astro Alphabet Soup, a new children's show at Fels Planetarium. Young astronomers can learn fun facts about the solar system as they explore outer space with Zoop, a fanciful creature. Featuring the ABCs as a guide, the 40-minute show introduces children to the words and names used in astronomy. Astro Alphabet Soup at Franklin Institute, Fels Planetarium, 20th Street and the Parkway, at 11:15 a.m. and 3:15 p.m. tomorrow and Sunday; weekends through March 1992.
NEWS
October 14, 2002 | By Trish Boppert
Like Rodney Dangerfield, Pluto, our solar system's puniest planet (for now, anyway) don't get no respect. Farthest from the sun, the perpetually gloomy planet is the only one that has never been visited by a spacecraft - one built by humans, anyway. But scientists long have questioned its legitimacy among the planets. Is it an escaped Neptunian moon? Is it just a big-sized glob from the Kuiper Belt, the solar-system junkyard just beyond Pluto's orbit? Whatever it is, say detractors, it ain't a planet.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first cluster of planets outside of our solar system has been discovered orbiting a star no bigger than the city of Philadelphia, a Pennsylvania State University astronomer said yesterday. "This is it," said Alexander Wolszozan, a Penn State astronomy professor. "We finally have solid, irrefutable evidence that there are planets outside of our solar system. " A scientific paper describing the discovery appears in today's issue of Science. It amplifies findings that were announced earlier this year at a scientific conference in Aspen, Colo.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | By GINO SEGRE
On Christmas Day, 1642, a boy was born under difficult circumstances. He was premature and given little chance of surviving; it was said he was so small he could be fitted into a quart pot. This young boy's father died a few months before his birth, and the boy's mother left when he was very young to pursue her own life in another city. After eight years, his mother returned, but shortly thereafter he was sent away to school, returning briefly at 17 to manage the family farm, and finally going off to college on what we would now call a scholarship.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  At NewAge Industries, what goes on under the roof has been the priority at the plastic-tubing manufacturer for 57 years. On Wednesday, all attention will be on the roof itself. There, a one-megawatt solar system consisting of 4,082 panels - a monster in terms of rooftop photovoltaic arrays and believed to be the biggest of its kind in Bucks County - will be the toast of local and state dignitaries, green-business advocates, and NewAge's 100 employees. For a plant that uses two megawatts of power a year to churn out tubing with widespread applicability - from pharmaceutical laboratories to McDonald's milk-shake machines - the solar project represents a serious cost-savings opportunity.
LIVING
November 23, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even in pictures, the surface of the sun inspires a sense of the forbidden - a subconscious fear of burnt corneas and blindness. But seen safely through the eyes of a spacecraft called SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), the sun appears as never before - its surface roiling, its wispy atmosphere erupting with flares. Some of SOHO's instruments monitor vibrations in the sun to see below the surface, mapping its internal structure. In a control room at the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center here, SOHO's pictures are beamed back to a computer screen, where scientists can see them, almost live.
LIVING
November 2, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After physicist Lawrence Krauss published a book called The Physics of Star Trek, he was sought out by NASA's administrator and asked to speak in front of meetings of NASA engineers and scientists. NASA is aiming to make science imitate science fiction - sending real spaceships beyond the confines of our little solar system and out toward the stars. Krauss told the NASA engineers that almost nothing on Star Trek would work in any sort of practical way - not antimatter propulsion or inertial dampers or warp drive.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | by Melanie C. Redmond, For the Daily News
FAR-FLUNG PLANET Astronomers from the Extrasolar Research Corporation in Pasadena, Calif., said recently that for the first time they have directly seen and photographed a planet outside our solar system. (Insert "The X-Files" theme music here.) NASA officials said the picture, taken through the Hubble Space Telescope, is the first that appears to show direct evidence of the existence of a planet outside the solar system, and I think that's a great discovery. Maybe one day, as technology advances, kids taking science class will not only have to memorize the planets in our own solar system, but those in other solar systems as well.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The NASA spacecraft Juno, en route to an unprecedented exploration of Jupiter and the origins of the solar system, lifted off Friday from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Juno launched aboard an Atlas 5 rocket at 12:25 p.m. into clear skies. The craft soared over the Atlantic then conducted two "burns" to set it on the right trajectory for a five-year, 1.7 billion-mile trip to Jupiter. "Today, with the launch of the Juno spacecraft, NASA began a journey to yet another new frontier," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
November 4, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
If, as Brian F. Keane maintains, Americans' buying decisions are motivated by (a) I want and (b) I need , where does solar power fit in? Keane, president of SmartPower, a national nonprofit organization that creates community programs for energy efficiency and clean energy, says 80 percent of Americans want solar power, but only 3 percent obtain it. "That's because we don't think we need it, because our houses and offices already come...
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Derrick H. Pitts
By Derrick H. Pitts Considering the recent close calls our planet has had with various asteroids, meteors, and comets, it's time to develop an early-warning system - a cosmic "heads up" - to detect the wanderers zooming through the solar system. The major concern, of course, is whether any of these space travelers is on a collision course with Earth. Our geologic record clearly indicates that not only have we been hit before, but in one instance, the object was large enough to significantly change the planet's environment, triggering the demise of the dinosaurs about 65 million years ago. If they couldn't survive an impact, what chance would mere humans have to survive?
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Now's your chance to see the comet that passed within 100 million miles of Earth last week. Twilight on Tuesday will provide the best photo op for Pan-STARRS. It will be visible in the Northern Hemisphere just above the western horizon - right next to a crescent moon. California astronomer Tony Phillips said the glare of the setting sun may make it difficult to see the comet with the naked eye. But he encourages casual sky gazers to give it a shot. The moon will provide an easy point of reference.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
K ATHRYN HALL, 26, of Schuylkill, is president of Power Up Gambia, a local nonprofit that provides electricity to hospitals and clinics in the West African nation of Gambia. Hall, a pediatric resident at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, founded PUG in 2006 while a premed student at Penn. Forbes magazine recently listed her as one of its "Top 30 Under 30" in the energy sector. Q: How did the idea for Power Up Gambia originate? A: I was in a cultural-exchange program to volunteer at a hospital in Gambia.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
True Green Capital Management L.L.C. and CIT Group Inc. announced the closing of $35 million of financing for a 12.3-megawatt solar rooftop system to provide power for the privatized housing community at Joint Military Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County. United Communities L.L.C., the owner of the 2,104-unit community, estimated the 13.7 million kilowatt hours produced each year by the system will provide about 40 percent of the community's annual electricity needs. United Communities is owned by First Montgomery Group of Marlton.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
LOS ANGELES - It was too expensive. It lacked editorial focus. And for a digital publication, it was strangely cut off from the Internet. That's the obituary being written in real time through posts, tweets and online chats about The Daily, the first-of-its-kind iPad newspaper, which is being shut down this month. Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. said Monday that The Daily will publish its final issue on Dec. 15, less than two years after its January 2011 launch. The app has already been removed from Apple's iTunes, where it once received lukewarm ratings.
NEWS
November 10, 2012
By Michael Lemonick Over the past few weeks, astronomers have announced not one but two extraordinary discoveries in the search for planets orbiting stars beyond the sun. The first was a world about the size of Neptune, 5,000 light-years away, whirling around in a solar system with four stars. It's something like Luke Skywalker's home world of Tatooine in the Star Wars movies, except that fictional planet sported only two suns. The second was an Earth-size planet right next door in the Alpha Centauri system, three stars that orbit one another not thousands or hundreds but a mere four light-years from our solar system.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
Frank B. McDonald, an astrophysicist and former NASA chief scientist who helped design scientific instruments for research flights into space and who was a key force behind several initiatives and programs that helped scientists peer into the reaches of the solar system, died Aug. 31 after giving a speech at a scientific symposium in Ypsilanti, Mich. He was 87. The death was announced by the University of Maryland, where Mr. McDonald had been a senior research scientist at the Institute for Physical Science and Technology.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Not long ago, Gov. Christie and New Jersey environmental groups wound up on the same side of an issue. Some of the groups actually praised the governor they are so frequently confronting. Hold the gasps. The rest of New Jersey residents can cheer as well, because it benefits them. The state took action that will make solar power somewhat more affordable. So if you're a resident who has been mulling the idea, now is the time to re-mull. Basically the state increased the amount of electricity that utilities must obtain from solar power.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
If we found life on another planet, the discovery would go a long way toward answering the deepest open questions in biology: How did life originate, how widespread is life in the universe, and are there alternative recipes for life? There's no obvious sign of life on any of our neighbors in the solar system. But desolate, frozen Mars keeps calling scientists back. In the Martian landscape, geologists see dry riverbeds and floodplains that hint at a warmer past that just might have allowed life to originate.
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