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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Clarence Holbrook Carter is one of the marvels of American art. Two weeks shy of his 90th birthday, he's having a solo exhibition at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, mostly of paintings completed during the last two decades but including some earlier work. This is a remarkable show because it presents a painter of advanced age still thinking and painting vigorously. Carter, who lives in Milford, N.J., was an American Scene-style realist in his middle career but in later life began to adopt a more mystical attitude toward life and art. The majority of the paintings in the Michener show address eternal themes such as life and death, time and eternity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The exhibition of work by Ritzi Jacobi in the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery at University of the Arts brings the ideas of a major fiber-art innovator to Philadelphia. It's the first solo show in America for the Romanian-born Jacobi, who has lived in Germany since 1970. Jacobi initially earned her reputation in collaboration with her husband, Peter; their work was seen here in 1981 in a traveling retrospective. This show, organized by fibers professor Warren Seelig, covers her career from the mid-1980s to the present through a variety of works - tapestries, fiber sculptures, drawings and maquettes.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If solo shows could be given dedications, artist Christine Lafuente might choose to dedicate her show to Seymour Remenick, her former teacher at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Most of Lafuente's works on view at the Somerville Manning Gallery here are floral still lifes, but she has included several cityscapes of Manayunk, a frequent subject of hers. Lafuente, who lives in Philadelphia and is an artist-in-residence at the Fleisher Art Memorial, shows a Manayunk of narrow, red-brick homes, silvery windows and spots of color seen in street signs.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Edie Newhall
If there is any trend dominating Philadelphia's contemporary-art landscape at this moment, it's the DIY, rough-around-the-edges one epitomized by the work of the Dufala brothers, Steven and Billy, who came to Philadelphia from South Jersey with instinctive talents for retrofitting and reinventing everyday things and infusing them with deadpan, often dark, humor. Their ice cream truck-turned-army tank, winner of the 2009 West Grand Prize, is still their classic of the genre. For their second solo show with Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, the prolific duo have pulled out all the stops and then some.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Edith Newhall, Inquirer gallery critic
Move over, Biennale. Philadelphia's much anticipated Philagrafika 2010, an international fest of contemporary printmaking, makes its formal debut this week, offering the works of hundreds of artists at scores of venues through April 11. Its core exhibition, "The Graphic Unconcious," will be divided among galleries at Moore College of Art & Design, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Print Center, and Temple's...
NEWS
September 9, 2007 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
Being able to express his innermost feelings, perceptions and passions on canvas is particularly satisfying for 22-year-old Scott Pozen. The Cherry Hill artist, who has faced multiple challenges throughout his life because of developmental/learning disabilities, has finally found a place through his artwork where he can feel confident and accomplished. Colors of the Soul, a solo exhibition of approximately 25 of Pozen's acrylic and watercolor abstract paintings, can be seen at the Markeim Art Center in Haddonfield through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011
SEVERAL collectives housed at 319 N. 11th St. are having First Friday openings tonight: *  Grizzly Grizzly. Juried group show. * Vox Populi. Members Gabriel Boyce, Dustin Sparks and Anna Neighbor; guest artists Del Harrow and Chadwick Augustine; and video by Kuan Hwa. * Tiger Strikes Asteroid. Solo show by Gerard Brown. * Marginal Utility. Solo show by Daniel Lefcourt. * Napoleon. Member show. * Space 1026. 1026 Arch St., 2nd floor. Solo show by Tim Kerr and friends.
NEWS
September 9, 2008 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may have seemed a little like the early 1980s to John Oates, one half of the pop-soul duo Hall and Oates. There was an excited audience in the dark waving flickers of light. There were yells and screams as Oates sang "Sara Smile" and one fan asked the singer to autograph a body part. But yesterday, Oates was visiting North Penn High School, his alma mater. The audience wasn't made up of peers, but of students born long after Oates' biggest hits. The flickers in the dark weren't lighters; they were cell phone cameras.
FOOD
January 29, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carbon footprint is a hot-button concept in culinary conversation now, as pressure mounts to consider the distance some foods travel to get to our plates - and the ethical consequences of our menu choices. That makes the lineup of performances at Asian Arts Initiative, a community-based arts center at 12th and Vine Streets, especially timely. "Cooking, Culture, Community and Consumption" relies heavily on humor to show how cooking can be key to social change. "The idea is this: If you are conscious about where your food comes from and what goes into your body, you're more likely to become conscious about what is going on all around you as well," says Minneapolis-based performance artist/comedian Robert Karimi.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Yesterday was a banner day for the United States and the Philadelphia Museum of Art at the opening of the 43d Venice Biennale. American painter Jasper Johns, representing his country in a solo show organized by the Art Museum, won the grand prize as the top artist in the prestigious exhibition. Another American, Barbara Bloom, was named the best of the 86 younger artists who are showing in a section of the Biennale called Aperto '88. The third major award, for the best national pavilion, went to Italy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
In Act II Playhouse's Mark Twain Unplugged , Tom Teti, as Twain, remarks, "The works of fine literature are like wine; mine are like water. But everybody drinks water. " Much beloved, oft-quoted, occasionally banned, with a history as colorful as his characters, the author makes an excellent, lively subject for a solo show. Unfortunately, this isn't that show. Teti, who also wrote the script and appeared in a 2012 People's Light and Theatre production as Twain, dons the white linen suit, white hair and iconic droopy moustache again here.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Steve Jobs said that the "i" in all the Apple products' names stood for "Internet, individual, instruct, inform, inspire. " And although the products are patented, the use of "i" is not, and Philly Shakes' solo show, iHamlet , an adaptation by Robin Malan, seems to mean the "i" literally as "I" since the show is made up of Hamlet's lines extracted from the play and strung together. Hamlet as narcissist. And a female narcissist to boot. The set is a chair and gigantic mirror into which Melissa Dunphy gazes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Tales of rock-and-roll excess fill Most Messed U p, the coming album by the Old 97's, due at the end of April. Songs such as "Let's Get Drunk and Get It On" and "Wasted" are full of drinking, swearing, and carousing, and they sound autobiographical coming from these alt-country mainstays. They're led by Rhett Miller and Murry Hammond, who released the first 97's album 20 years ago. Most of the stories are told in retrospect, and one might hope they depict the past more than the present, for the health of the band members' livers and marriages.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Saturday Night Live , NBC's long-running comic showcase, sheds its skin every few years, along with cast members. In the most recent shedding, before the current season, SNL lost Fred Armisen, who - with "special musical guest Ian Rubbish" - comes to Underground Arts Thursday night for a solo show. With SNL since 2002, Armisen, 46, created oddball characters such as Venezuelan nightclub host Fericito, unfunny Native American comedian Billy Smith - and Rubbish, a politically perverse '70s/'80s punk guitarist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
THE COOGI sweater: Those colorful monstrosities of fabric that Bill Cosby sported weekly on his eponymous show and later rapper Notorious B.I.G. would appropriate for himself. Who knew they could be art? Jayson Musson did. Musson, who spent almost half of his 34 years learning and making art in Philadelphia, cuts up each sweater and stitches the pieces back together, stretching the finished piece so it looks like a painting from far away, but up close is filled with differing textures as the knits create mountains and valleys of color.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Three solo and three group shows hold sway currently at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, in a roundup featuring many Philadelphia artists. A degree of spontaneity stamps the double shows "Under Construction, Parts I and II," which display work by 10 regional artists currently involved in combining various aspects of construction, architecture, design and sculpture. Some use ordinary building materials, others construction-site discards. Especially compelling are robust sculptural works Acanthus Model and The Movement of Objects by Wilmington's Joe Netta, both subtle essays in texture, structure, and composition - energetic, evocative pieces that establish definite mood and atmosphere.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Edie Newhall
If there is any trend dominating Philadelphia's contemporary-art landscape at this moment, it's the DIY, rough-around-the-edges one epitomized by the work of the Dufala brothers, Steven and Billy, who came to Philadelphia from South Jersey with instinctive talents for retrofitting and reinventing everyday things and infusing them with deadpan, often dark, humor. Their ice cream truck-turned-army tank, winner of the 2009 West Grand Prize, is still their classic of the genre. For their second solo show with Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, the prolific duo have pulled out all the stops and then some.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011
SEVERAL collectives housed at 319 N. 11th St. are having First Friday openings tonight: *  Grizzly Grizzly. Juried group show. * Vox Populi. Members Gabriel Boyce, Dustin Sparks and Anna Neighbor; guest artists Del Harrow and Chadwick Augustine; and video by Kuan Hwa. * Tiger Strikes Asteroid. Solo show by Gerard Brown. * Marginal Utility. Solo show by Daniel Lefcourt. * Napoleon. Member show. * Space 1026. 1026 Arch St., 2nd floor. Solo show by Tim Kerr and friends.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Their art may be visually dissimilar, but Cecilia Biagini and Matthew Cox, who are currently having their first solo shows at Pentimenti Gallery, share an interest in pattern, repetition, construction, and materials. And, like that of many of the artists who've exhibited here, their work is meticulously made. Biagini, from Buenos Aires and now in Brooklyn, shows paintings and wall-mounted sculptures that create a sense of rhythm with repeated lines and geometric forms. In her paintings, thin parallel lines of yellow, orange, and pale blue swoop synchronistically against darker backgrounds, looking as though they're floating in space.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Edith Newhall, Inquirer gallery critic
Move over, Biennale. Philadelphia's much anticipated Philagrafika 2010, an international fest of contemporary printmaking, makes its formal debut this week, offering the works of hundreds of artists at scores of venues through April 11. Its core exhibition, "The Graphic Unconcious," will be divided among galleries at Moore College of Art & Design, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Print Center, and Temple's...
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