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Soloist

ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
The increasing authority its curated "Solo Series" exhibitions of regional art have won for the Abington Art Center is reflected in their progressively more adventurous character. Abington's current show by four soloists is an excellent example. It doesn't genuflect before tradition, yet in several instances takes as much notice of life as of art. And like its predecessors, it has a good long run of 2 1/2 months, a rarity for contemporary work in our region. Front and center is Jedediah Morfit, who impresses because he possesses a genuine vision.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Quoting Gustav Mahler is not a wholesome activity for composers, if only because you can't give his music a cameo appearance and expect to move on. You want to hear the entire Mahler piece being quoted. The memory more than lingers. But quoting was inevitable at Wednesday's "Mahler100/Schoenberg60" concert by Mimi Stillman's Dolce Suono Ensemble in three of the five new works commissioned for the occasion. Most were songs, ostensibly, but with ambitions - and a sense of drama from the star soloist, bass Eric Owens, that often suggested operatic scenes for chamber ensemble and voice.
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard F. Robinson, 82, of Lansdowne, a church choir director, cantor, and soloist, died of complications from kidney disease Saturday, Feb. 12, at St. Francis Country House in Darby. For 25 years, Mr. Robinson led the adult choir at St. Philomena's Church in Lansdowne before becoming ill in 2007. He also was a soloist at weddings and funerals and was cantor during Masses, leading the congregation in singing and liturgical responses. Previously, he directed the men's and boy's choir at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in South Philadelphia for 15 years and for several years taught singing at the School of the Holy Child in Rosemont.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The big picture couldn't have looked more wonderful at the outset of Brahms' Ein Deutsches Requiem Tuesday at the Kimmel Center, where the piece was heard in a rare collaboration between the Dresden Staatskapelle, under Daniel Harding, and the Westminster Symphonic Choir of New Jersey's Westminster Choir College. Most often, you hear the piece performed by amateur choirs and pickup orchestras, not groups this beloved in their respective fields. Sometimes, though, the more defined a group's personality, the less easy the collaboration.
NEWS
October 5, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Great Tchaikovsky playing, an East Coast premiere by a major composer and an A-list soloist wouldn't be taken for granted in a major city. But here? Where people usually spend autumn weekends shopping and escaping urban overstimulation? The Princeton Symphony Orchestra's season-opening concert Sunday at sold-out Richardson Auditorium delivered a hugely promising manifesto under new music director Rossen Milanov, so much that even those who think they know his music profile from his years as associate conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra (which will end in 2011)
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though Samuel Barber's music was long considered a glorious postscript to a bygone era, his sweet-and-sour lyricism was the frequent starting point at Orchestra 2001's season finale last weekend. The particularly substantial 2 1/2-hour program - well prepared under conductor James Freeman - had two full concertos (both new to Philadelphia) and a new vocal work. Barber was represented only by his Knoxville: Summer of 1915, but his presence was pervasive. The irony award goes to Andrew Rudin, whose Concerto for Piano and Small Orchestra wasn't misnamed, but implied a modesty of means not borne out by this 40-minute work that covered too much musical territory for its own good - some of it not worth visiting.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Throngs of screaming young girls appeared to be giving the Philadelphia Orchestra a teenyboppers' farewell as the Japanese leg of the 2010 Tour of Asia came to a close. The minute the orchestra's buses pulled up at Tokyo Haneda International Airport for the flight to Seoul, the screaming began - and then abruptly stopped. The orchestra, as it turned out, was not the object of the crowd's Thursday-morning vigil. Some hot Korean movie star was due to alight there, and his fans were too preoccupied with his arrival to utter his name intelligibly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's startling to realize how much a single orchestral player can lift up everything going on around him or her, and no arrival has been better for the ensemble health of the Philadelphia Orchestra than that, in 2003, of Ricardo Morales. The principal clarinetist, in fact, may represent the most salutary personnel event of the orchestra's last decade. An ensemble player, however, does not a soloist make. The skills of the two jobs are not merely distinct, they're at opposite ends of the individuality spectrum.
NEWS
January 3, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Murphy, 74, an educator and a singer whom Eugene Ormandy called "Philadelphia's greatest bass-baritone," died of cancer Dec. 24 at Willow Valley Manor in Lancaster. In the early 1960s, Mr. Murphy seemed destined for international opera stardom. He studied voice in New York with famed instructor Beverly Johnson and received rave reviews for his Papageno in the Washington National Opera's production of The Magic Flute. He worked with Igor Stravinsky and recorded two works with the composer, Renard and The Nightingale.
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