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NEWS
February 6, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It may not be sunny in Philly, but wherever the Philadelphia Orchestra goes on its current tour of the Canary Islands and Europe, rain stops, snow melts and clouds part. The sun shines figuratively as well. Ticket sales for the three-week, 14-concert tour of the Canary Islands, Iberia and Central Europe so far have been excellent. Although other U.S. orchestras are forgoing overseas tours (and lack of sponsorship forced Philadelphia to cancel this summer's round of European festivals)
NEWS
November 6, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The concerto soloist is capable of playing more notes than what is humanly possible. Named Bart 42, the violin has two bows, played simultaneously at hyperspeed from commands emanating from a laptop computer. The instrument's frenetic bowing can divide a given second into 100 partial seconds. It snowballs into an unimaginable mass of electronic sound - while also interacting with the 100 percent human Philadelphia Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra. "It's a really unique palette. The quality is dramatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What a fun concert. The Philadelphia Orchestra's concerto soloist Thursday was David Kim, celebrating his 10th anniversary as concertmaster (and obviously excited about it), with guest conductor Rafael Fr?hbeck de Burgos, who always has a welcome mat in my psyche, given how much his cogent, coloristically rich manner applies to music he does better than anybody (Falla) as well as to less-characteristic repertoire in need of his strengths (Schumann's Symphony No. 3). At the outset, the program didn't seem like something that would compete so successfully against Thursday's World Series game (Verizon Hall had hardly any empty seats)
NEWS
September 21, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Pennink, 78, a retired concert pianist, died of a heart attack Aug. 31 at his home in Huntingdon Valley. Mr. Pennink survived World War II as a teenager hiding with his family in Indonesia. Mr. Pennink, who studied music in The Hague and Paris, ceased performing 20 years ago. His last solo concert was in the late 1970s at the University of Pennsylvania, his son Mark said, though "in the mid-'80s there were some benefit concerts . . . on the property at his house. " Mr. Pennink's father was a Dutch colonial official who died in a concentration camp after the Japanese invaded the Dutch East Indies, now Indonesia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Near the end of Paradise and the Peri, where the Persian-fairy title character finally wins entry to heaven, the music grows so expansive and ecstatic it really leaves you no choice but to join in the victory and convert. But to what? Islam? Christianity? The most sensible choice is probably neither, since to feel full immersion in Schumann's masterwork you need to be nothing less highly evolved than a dedicated aesthete. Thursday's performance of the piece by Simon Rattle and the Philadelphia Orchestra - a first time for both - unveiled a rarity whose startling, febrile score and flowery text might have spoken to the sensibilities of an earlier era, but whose aesthetic, it turns out, may be more apt for our times.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
So slowly has it happened in the last decade that it's hard to see how obsequious music groups have grown. For proof, look at the Philadelphia Orchestra, which, facing audience flight, recently revealed that it would be turning to listeners for advice on repertoire. So much for the smart art of programming and the importance of guiding public taste. Thank your lucky stars, then, for Orchestra 2001. Saturday night at the Independence Seaport Museum they left me feeling grateful even for a programming failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Pennsylvania Ballet unleashed a triumph Thursday night, with its world premiere of a steamy, explosive new Carmina Burana at the Academy of Music. Any worries about replacing John Butler's version - a favorite for four decades - now can be forgotten. The hour-long ballet, choreographed by corps de ballet member and de facto resident choreographer Matthew Neenan, sped along in a revel of eruptive jumps, sexy duets and full, lush ensemble sections. Loosely based on a series of poems about drinking, gambling, fate, life and love, it was danced in an ever-changing variety of skin-tight costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Comparisons are accumulating. A year ago, violinists Janine Jansen and Julian Rachlin were, very simply, violinists. Now that these two promising soloists are an acknowledged couple - and how often do violinists get together? - they're compared to soccer star David Beckham and Spice Girl Victoria Adams - in a more genteel classical-music incarnation. At least last year. Now they're Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie with fiddles. "Omigod," said Jansen the other day on the phone from Europe.
NEWS
December 11, 2006 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's quite possible that Gloria Justen stands exactly at the precipice of classical music's past and future. You've no doubt noticed her before. The violinist, who played Prokofiev yesterday afternoon with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, is a freelancer around town, and might be the only regular substitute with the Philadelphia Orchestra whose hair color is seasonally adjusted to intense shades of artificial tint. Yesterday, it was coal-black.
NEWS
June 23, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Many musical mysteries resolve themselves if only given enough time and thought. But I'll bet that in my final moments, as my life is flashing before me, I'll still be baffled by the acoustics and sound design at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. On Night Two of the Philadelphia Orchestra summer season on Wednesday, the two halves of the concert were completely different experiences, seemingly played by vastly different orchestras. The size of the ensembles varied from one half to the next, the first having a smaller group appropriate to Mozart's Don Giovanni overture and Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 5, known as The Emperor, with the ever-welcome soloist Emanuel Ax. Whether the fault lay with the performance, the acoustics or amplification, the orchestral sound was miserable.
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