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Solomon Islands

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NEWS
June 5, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The prime minister of the Solomon Islands has been taken hostage and armed rebels have put up roadblocks in the islands' capital of Honiara, New Zealand's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said today. Ministry spokesman Brad Pattersfield said insurgents from the Solomon Islands' Malaita Eagle Force militia were holding Prime Minister Bartholemew Ulufa'alua hostage. He spoke after talking with New Zealand's High Commission in Honiara. In Canberra, Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said armed groups had overrun key installations in Honiara overnight in an apparent coup attempt in the country, which is 1,125 miles off Australia's northeast coast.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Japanese destroyer lurched out of the darkness on Aug. 2, 1943, and sliced the American torpedo boat in half, leaving a young skipper and dazed members of his crew clinging to the ship's bow as it bobbed like a cork in the weltering sea. Surrounded by enemy Japanese in the New Georgias, a remote archipelago in the western Solomon Islands, the shipwrecked Americans treaded water and swam and finally crawled up on the white sand of a palm-topped coral...
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an overgrown field not far from where American Marines stormed ashore on Guadalcanal, Bruce Klahr strolls through the wrecks of old amphibious tractors like a kid in a candy store. This is what he has come halfway around the world to see on his vacation, the wrecks and remnants of the Second World War. And it doesn't get much better than this - piles of live ammunition, sunken warships and a welter of airplane crash sites. A retired exporter from Boulder, Colo., Klahr, 47, fancies himself the world's most widely traveled war tourist, having visited battlefields in 102 countries, from Normandy to Corregidor, from a bridge too far in Holland to the bridge on the River Kwai in Thailand.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Typhoon Namu reached the Solomon Islands with winds of 115 m.p.h., and one news report yesterday said it might have left more than a third of the population homeless on the South Pacific island chain. There has been no official figure on the death toll or number of people made homeless in the islands, which are 1,000 miles northeast of Australia and have a population of about 240,000. Five children and three policemen were among the 50 reported missing, according to news reports reaching the Papua New Guinea capital of Port Moresby, 870 miles west of the Solomons' capital of Honiara, on Guadalcanal Island.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The first 1991 commemorative printed with the 29-cent denomination will be issued Friday to recognize the bicentennial of Vermont statehood. The design shows a stylized red farmhouse and a tilled field, with rolling hills and mountains in the background. Across the top, Vermont is printed in white lettering, and across the bottom are 1791 and USA. Vermont ratified the U.S. Constitution March 4, 1791, in Bennington and was admitted as the 14th state of the Union. This is the third stamp for Vermont.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Kristen Gelineau, Associated Press
SYDNEY, Australia - At least six bodies have been found in the sodden wreckage left by a tsunami that smashed into villages in the Solomon Islands, flattening dozens of homes in the South Pacific island chain. The 5-foot waves that roared inland on Santa Cruz Island, in the eastern Solomons, on Wednesday were too fast to outrun for five elderly villagers and one child, who died after being sucked under the rushing water, George Herming, a spokesman for the prime minister, said Thursday.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Leonard A. Levin, 76, longtime Vineland dentist and one of the first to work in mobile dental trailers aiding indigent children, died Sunday at Newcomb Medical Center, Vineland. A lifelong Vineland resident, he was a 1939 graduate of Vineland High School. Dr. Levin practiced dentistry with offices at 609 Landis Ave. in Vineland for many years. He also was the part-time dentist for the New Jersey Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland for 42 years before retiring last year. He also was the first dentist in Cumberland County - and perhaps in New Jersey - to provide dental care to indigent children through a state program using a mobile dental trailer.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Many villagers have gone without food since the disastrous Typhoon Namu killed at least 100 people when it swept through the Solomon Islands nearly a week ago, relief officials said yesterday. They said it would take at least six months before cultivation of rice and sweet potatoes - staples in the islanders' diet - could get under way again. The capital of Honiara, where about 10,000 of an estimated 100,000 homeless villagers have taken refuge, is also short of food. "We will need at least six months' food supply for the cyclone victims," one official said.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a measure of the trouble here in what might otherwise be called paradise, Barnabus Bana has a wanted poster tacked up on the wall of his front porch for a dreaded family of miscreants. They go by the name of Anopheles, come out just after dark and put the bite on just about anyone. We're talking mosquitoes, of course. And if they get you, here in the Solomon Islands, the odds are you'll go down - and go down hard. What the place lacks in crime, it makes up for in malaria, which is why the wanted poster on Bana's front porch for anopheline mosquitoes says, "Wanted dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1992 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
A dip in the pool is one favorite way to escape the summer heat. An armchair adventurer can take a plunge with two new nautical releases from Bennett Marine Video: The War Reefs: The Solomon Islands and Sub-Mersion. Both tapes deal in the remnants of World War II. In The War Reefs, (42 minutes, $19.95) diver and filmmaker Stan Waterman visits Iron Bottom Sound near Guadalcanal in the Solomons, a graveyard of ships and planes that clashed in three major naval battles. Sub-Mersion (30 minutes, $24.95)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Not all the good guys supported the Allied side in World War II. At the time, many agreed when Humphrey Bogart's bar owner Rick Blaine remarked, "I stick my neck out for nobody. " But even Bogie's Casablancan cynic would have rallied to the cause after seeing Delaware Theatre Company's rousing and resplendent production of Richard Rodgers' and Oscar Hammerstein's South Pacific. On DTC's smallish stage, the cast of 26 romps across Dirk Durosette's wicker set pieces and colorful backdrops (including a real Jeep and a model fighter plane)
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Kristen Gelineau, Associated Press
SYDNEY, Australia - At least six bodies have been found in the sodden wreckage left by a tsunami that smashed into villages in the Solomon Islands, flattening dozens of homes in the South Pacific island chain. The 5-foot waves that roared inland on Santa Cruz Island, in the eastern Solomons, on Wednesday were too fast to outrun for five elderly villagers and one child, who died after being sucked under the rushing water, George Herming, a spokesman for the prime minister, said Thursday.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
AS A BANKER, John Judge had one guiding principle: to help people own their own homes. He was an officer of Continental Savings & Loan, and he saw to it that people, mostly in the West Philadelphia neighborhood where he grew up, got the loans they needed to fulfill the dream of owning property. He went on to other banking positions and didn't retire until he was 89, when he was a director of Prudential Bancorp Inc., into which Continental had morphed. His mission always was to serve the customers and to encourage them to follow his lifelong passion for saving money.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert H. Dillard, 92, of Gladwyne, a retired Procter & Gamble executive and decorated World War II Marine, died Sunday, March 13, at Lankenau Hospital. A native of Dillard, Ga., a town named for his family, Mr. Dillard earned a bachelor's degree from Mercer University in Macon, where he played on the baseball and basketball teams. During World War II, he was an officer with the First Marine Division in the Pacific. On Guadalcanal, Lt. Dillard led his unit to help capture an airfield after his superior officers were killed.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Zoppetti, 93, formerly of South Philadelphia, a star college quarterback and retired firefighter, died Saturday at Saunders House in Wynnewood. Mr. Zoppetti, nicknamed "Zip" for his speed, led Duquesne University to a 13-12 victory over Mississippi State University in the Orange Bowl in 1937. After graduating from Duquesne in 1938, he coached football at St. Francis High School in Morgantown, W.Va., and was later an assistant coach at Duquesne. He played the 1941 football season with the Pittsburgh Steelers as a tailback before joining the Marine Corps in January 1942.
NEWS
April 7, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Davenport, 81, a University of Pennsylvania professor who designed the Pacific section of the school's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology , died March 12 of leukemia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. The peripatetic Mr. Davenport lived in Germantown, Society Hill, Manayunk and North East, Md., during the years he taught at Penn. Mr. Davenport was born and raised in Cucamonga, Calif., and in 1939 studied art and photography for a year at the Art Center School in Los Angeles before joining the U.S. merchant marine.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | By Bill Barber
Today is Aug. 14. Just another midsummer day with no particular significance, right? Well, it sure is special to me. Fifty-eight years ago, Aug. 14 was the happiest day of my life, and probably in the lives of millions of other Americans. It was the day Japan surrendered. It was the end, after many long years of struggle and suffering, of World War II. It was the day when I gratefully realized that maybe I did have a life ahead of me, after all. Until that moment, I and most of my GI buddies had many doubts about that.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Rick Horowitz
I'm just guessing here, but see if I'm on to something: The last thing you need at the start of a shiny new year is another reason to worry. You've got enough on your mind already, and besides, what's the point of turning over the calendar if you can't feel optimistic about things for at least a little while? Time's up. So what do you think about the Kyrgyz Republic? Not much, I'll bet. That's OK - you don't have to be embarrassed about it. If you're like most people, you haven't spent much time lately thinking about the Kyrgyz Republic, even with all its problems.
NEWS
December 4, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Claude Francis Koch, 82, an author, recipient of the O. Henry Award for short stories, and professor emeritus at La Salle University, died on Saturday of pneumonia at his home in Chestnut Hill. Mr. Koch grew up in the city's Fern Hill Park section and graduated from Northeast Catholic High School in 1936. He earned a bachelor's degree in business from then-La Salle College and a master's degree in creative writing from the University of Florida in 1957. Immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Mr. Koch enlisted in the United States Marine Corps.
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The prime minister of the Solomon Islands has been taken hostage and armed rebels have put up roadblocks in the islands' capital of Honiara, New Zealand's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said today. Ministry spokesman Brad Pattersfield said insurgents from the Solomon Islands' Malaita Eagle Force militia were holding Prime Minister Bartholemew Ulufa'alua hostage. He spoke after talking with New Zealand's High Commission in Honiara. In Canberra, Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said armed groups had overrun key installations in Honiara overnight in an apparent coup attempt in the country, which is 1,125 miles off Australia's northeast coast.
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