CollectionsSomalia
IN THE NEWS

Somalia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/ DAILY NEWS
Workers at the American Friends Service Committee in Center City load a 14,000-pound shipment of relief supplies bound for two orphanages in Somalia that the Quaker organization has been operating with Somali staff for the past 10 years. "We hope the 140-bale shipment . . . will be followed by larger ones," said Lucy Murphy, director of AFSC's material aids program.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - World leaders pledged new help to tackle terrorism and piracy in Somalia, but insisted Thursday that the East African nation must quickly form a stable government and threatened penalties against those who hamper its progress. Nations pledged new funding, additional training for soldiers and coast guards, increased cooperation over terrorism, and a new drive to root out those who finance and profit from piracy, after the shipping industry paid out $135 million in ransoms last year.
NEWS
December 10, 2011 | By Abdi Guled and Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - At the beginning of the year, armed Islamic extremists held sway over most of Mogadishu. Today, this war-scarred capital is secure enough to host the first visit by the U.N. secretary-general in nearly two decades. Ban Ki-moon announced during a surprise visit to Mogadishu on Friday that the United Nations will reopen its political offices in this seaside capital, a city heavily scarred by war. The announcement underscored the security progress made by African Union troops in the fight against al-Shabab militants, but also of the need for the U.N. to more closely monitor the Somali government, which is funded by foreign donors.
NEWS
October 14, 1993
Those who don't remember the past may be condemned to repeat it. But those who draw strained analogies to past events may be condemned to make new and different mistakes. The army-backed thugs who wouldn't allow U.S. and Canadian troops to land in Haiti earlier this week apparently think they can take advantage of horror and concern over the deaths of U.S. soldiers in Somalia by getting Americans to equate the two situations. They may be right. The armed toughs who harassed American officials and kept the USS Harlan County from landing shouted they would do the same to Americans as Somali rebels did. Those were the magic words, apparently.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | BY JOHN Q. COSTON
Contrary to Elmer Smith's opinion piece of Dec. 1, intervention in Somalia is not "last year's debate. " It is not last year's debate because what President Bush proposes to do is unlawful. It is amazing how people like Mr. Smith will suborn that which is lawful for what they believe to be laudable. Particularly if theirs is not the body that takes the bullet. It is strange how the dogs of war bark most vociferously when they are not less than 3,000 miles by air behind the closest general.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Three officials have been arrested for mismanaging a scholarship scheme that sends Somali students to Turkey, Somalia's education minister said Saturday, a sign that the fledgling government is committed to fighting the corruption that contributes to the country's failed-state status. Minister Maryan Qasim Ahmed said the officials were arrested for offering the scholarships to undeserving students. The officials include the ministry's former director general, who faced widespread accusations that he took bribes, Ahmed said.
NEWS
October 11, 1993 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Hell was a-poppin' last week: Earthshaking events in Russia, heartbreaking events in Somalia. On the domestic front, the plate is piled unusually high, what with the North American Free Trade Agreement, health-care reform and the need for some sober consideration of whether we actually want to make the Rev. Don Wildmon our official national television censor. So what am I stuck with? The case of the pregnant cheerleaders at Hempstead High. In New York, they wanted to know about the pregnant cheerleader case.
NEWS
August 31, 2009 | By Farah Abdi, Ridwa Abdi, and Jeremy Prestholdt
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's recent meeting with Somali President Sharif Ahmed was a reminder of his country's importance to American foreign policy and a step in the right direction. Yet it will take much more to address Somalia's desperate situation. A surge in piracy, a humanitarian crisis, and an increasing number of foreign fighters in the country all demand sustained attention. Mention of Somalia conjures images from the film Black Hawk Down or media coverage of pirate attacks.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | Associated Press
BERBERA, Somalia - Their mother was shot and they were driven through a raging civil war, destined to be pets in the Middle East - until Somali authorities intervened to save two lion cubs smuggled aboard a ship in the chaotic country's port. The two tiny cubs, a brother and sister, are believed to be rare Berbera lions because of their spotted coats. They were confiscated four weeks ago after Mogadishu's port manager reported his suspicions to Bancroft, an organization which is training African Union peacekeepers in the war-ravaged Somali capital.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration sought to assure aid groups Tuesday that they can deliver desperately needed food to famine-stricken parts of Somalia without fear of prosecution, even if some assistance is diverted to al-Qaeda-linked extremists blamed for helping to deliver hundreds of thousands of people to the brink of starvation. Administration officials said the United States had issued new guidelines on laws barring material assistance to al-Shabab - laws that humanitarian groups have criticized as a contributing factor to the crisis.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
When, in 1993, the body of an American soldier was dragged, beaten and bloodied, through the streets of Mogadishu in Somalia, Paul Watson photographed the horror, winning the Pulitzer Prize for the picture. He believes the dead soldier said to him, "If you do this, I will own you forever. " That haunting has, apparently, endured to this day, recorded in Watson's memoir, Where War Lives, and in Dan O'Brien's play The Body of an American , at the Wilma Theater until Feb. 1. The play concerns war and Watson's belief that war lives inside us. So rather than indict the inhumanity of those who inflict the misery, the play's documentary style becomes a kind of travelogue of suffering: Rwanda, Somalia, Iraq, Philippines, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Syria.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
A story Friday on a service honoring Staff Sgt. Randall Shughart, a Pennsylvanian killed in a 1993 battle in Somalia, misstated how many Pennsylvanians died in that battle. Sgt. First Class Earl Fillmore Jr., 28, of Blairsville, also died. In addition, Inquirer reporter Mark Bowden's series on the events did not receive a Pulitzer Prize. A story Friday about Camphill Village Kimberton Hills misspelled the name of the philanthropist Mabel Pew Myrin.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | BY DOYLE McMANUS
WHO EXACTLY is the enemy in the continuing U.S. war against terrorism? In some cases, the answer is: It's a secret. When the United States began its war against al Qaeda, after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the identity of the enemy was clear: Osama bin Laden and his followers, and the Taliban who protected them in Afghanistan. Congress quickly passed a resolution authorizing President George W. Bush to use "all necessary and appropriate force" against anyone who "planned, authorized, committed or aided" the 9/11 attacks, plus anyone who harbored them.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - The 2011 Somali famine killed an estimated 260,000 people, according to a new report to be published this week, officials told the Associated Press. The total more than doubles previous estimates, and half of the victims were age 5 and younger. The aid community believes tens of thousands of people died needlessly because the international community was slow to respond to early signs of approaching hunger in East Africa in late 2010 and early 2011. The toll was also exacerbated by extremist militants from al-Shabab who banned food-aid deliveries to the areas of south-central Somalia that they controlled.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Abdi Guled and Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - A barrage of bullets and two car bomb blasts rattled Mogadishu on Sunday when nine al-Shabab Islamic extremists stormed Somalia's main court complex, officials said, in a two-hour attack that shows the country's most dangerous militant group may be down but not defeated. A preliminary death toll stood at 16, including all nine attackers. The government didn't immediately publicize the number of security forces, government employees. and civilians who died. The assault was the most serious in Mogadishu since al-Shabab was forced out of the capital in August 2011.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Three officials have been arrested for mismanaging a scholarship scheme that sends Somali students to Turkey, Somalia's education minister said Saturday, a sign that the fledgling government is committed to fighting the corruption that contributes to the country's failed-state status. Minister Maryan Qasim Ahmed said the officials were arrested for offering the scholarships to undeserving students. The officials include the ministry's former director general, who faced widespread accusations that he took bribes, Ahmed said.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Jamey Keaten and Abdi Guled, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - A raid to free a French intelligence agent held captive in Somalia for three years went horribly wrong, leaving 17 Islamists and at least one French commando dead in a mud-caked farming town deep in militant territory. In the chaotic aftermath of the firefight, the hostage's fate was unclear Saturday. The Islamists denied French claims that he was killed and said they had a new prisoner - a wounded French soldier. The botched rescue in East Africa came the same day French air strikes in the West African nation of Mali targeted resurgent rebel Islamists.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The top U.S. military commander in Africa warned Monday against any premature military action in Mali, even as he said that al-Qaeda-linked extremists have strengthened their hold on the northern part of the country. Army Gen. Carter Ham said that any military intervention done now would likely fail and would set the precarious situation there back "even farther than they are today. " The African Union and United Nations are currently discussing the funding, troops, and other assistance necessary to take back northern Mali from the extremists who took control earlier this year.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Abdi Guled, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Somalia's new president survived an assassination attempt on his second day in office when two suicide bombers blew themselves up Wednesday while trying to gain access into a heavily guarded hotel that is his temporary residence, officials and witnesses said. The attack highlights the challenge that insecurity caused by an Islamist insurgency poses to Somalia's fledgling government, which is expected to help transform the east African country from being a failed state to one with functioning government.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
Syrian rebels get atrocity warning BEIRUT, Lebanon - The top U.N. human-rights official warned opposition fighters in Syria on Monday that they would not be immune from prosecution for atrocities, as videos from the Syrian city of Aleppo appeared to show a mass execution by rebel fighters of bound and blindfolded Syrian government soldiers. One of the videos, first publicized Monday on the Brown Moses blog, which curates and analyzes video evidence from Syria, showed at least 20 corpses lying in crooked rows on a bloodstained street curb.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|