CollectionsSomalis
IN THE NEWS

Somalis

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOGADISHU, SOMALIA - Sacks of grain, peanut-butter snacks and other food staples meant for starving Somalis are being stolen and sold in markets, an Associated Press investigation has found, raising concerns that thieving businessmen are undermining international famine-relief efforts in this nearly lawless country. The U.N.'s World Food Program acknowledged for the first time that it has been investigating food theft in Somalia for two months. The WFP strongly condemned any diversion of "even the smallest amount of food from starving and vulnerable Somalis.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
To Marty Perkins, the current mess in Somalia comes as no surprise. Perkins, who graduated from the Glen Mills School in Glen Mills, Delaware County, in 1987, was stationed in Mogadishu, Somalia, from December 1992 to February 1993. He and other Army soldiers were sent in to ensure the safe transport of food to the starving Somalis. Even then, he said in a telephone interview yesterday, the situation was a mess. Now, he calls it a "fiasco. " "Our second night there we were attacked, but it was a disorganized, kind- of-feeling-out attack," he said.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | by Michael Maren, New York Times
Once again, United Nations peacekeepers are watching Somalia's factions fight it out. This round of fighting, the heaviest since before the U.S.-led intervention in December 1992, was started by Ali Mahdi Mohammed, who means to drive Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid out of Mogadishu once and for all. U.N. inaction raises a question: If the peacekeepers aren't keeping the peace, what are they doing? Why did the Security Council extend the mandate for the operation in Somalia until the end of September?
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | By Angus Shaw, ASSOCIATED PRESS
While the wounds of war remain wide in Mogadishu, the rest of Somalia is slowly on the mend. Two good rainy seasons this year have led to bountiful fruit, grain and vegetable harvests that are finding their way to market. So, while one-fourth of Somalia's 6.5 million people still get food aid, few Somalis depend exclusively on emergency feeding and almost no one would starve if donations dried up. As a result, relief agencies are phasing out food handouts and turning to the task of rebuilding the nation's agricultural base, officials say. "The worst has passed," said Peter Jobber, head of the U.N. World Food Program in Somalia.
NEWS
July 12, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Up to 80 Somalis were killed when the U.N. launched an aerial attack with U.S. helicopter gunships on positions held by warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid today, a U.N. spokesman said. And an Associated Press photographer and two Reuters journalists were reported killed by a Somali mob today after the helicopters blasted targets in southern Mogadishu. Two other journalists were missing. The U.N. spokesman said the target of the raid was the operation command office of Aidid's Somalia National Alliance (SNA)
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Thousands of Somalis shouting "Clinton is a warlord" demonstrated against the United Nations yesterday on the spot where Pakistani soldiers were gunned down two weeks ago in an ambush that provoked a military crackdown. U.N. officials said yesterday that they were playing a waiting game in their attempts to nab warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, who has gone into hiding since a major offensive against his militia's stronghold. The hottest question since Thursday's air and ground assault has been the whereabouts of the man who has been accused of orchestrating the June 5 clash that killed 24 Pakistani U.N. soldiers and wounded 58. That clash's toll rose from 23 when a Pakistani died of wounds, said Maj. David Stockwell, a U.N. military spokesman.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | Daily News wire services
MOGADISHU DEPARTING YANKS COME UNDER FIRE Egyptian troops serving with U.N. peacekeeping forces in Somalia provided cover for their U.S. comrades yesterday as the last major American combat unit came under fire as soldiers waited to leave for home. U.S. soldiers assembling at the U.N.-controlled airfield scrambled for cover as shots fired by Somalis whistled overhead and Egyptian guards peppered the streets with return fire. Unconfirmed reports said the gunfight erupted after several Somalis tried to loot a rival gang's vehicle.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | Knight-Ridder Tribune / RICARDO MAZALAN
U.S. Marines in Somalia filed into an amphibious vehicle last week as they and other U.N. peacekeeping forces ended a two-year intervention. The mission fed thousands of starving Somalis but was unable to bring stability to the nation. The warlords who were in place before the intervention were there when it ended.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephanie had just returned from a walk to escape the agony of waiting in the house when the car pulled up. Two soldiers got out, plus her husband's buddy, John Aliveto, who had introduced her to Randy three years ago. Plus the chaplain. When she saw them, she got up from the porch, went inside and sat in Randy's navy blue easy chair. It was the nearest she could get to him now and the safest place to hear what they were about to say. After a week of anguish, of attending soldiers' funerals and Fort Bragg memorial services, of hoping that Randy, although officially missing in action in Mogadishu, might somehow turn up on TV, captured, like the battered helicopter pilot, here came the words she dreaded: Sgt. First Class Randall D. Shughart, 35, Green Beret, son of a Pennsylvania dairy farmer and husband for one year and 10 months of Stephanie A. Shughart, with whom he had planned his future, was dead.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a moment rife with dread, surprise, panic, suspense. In Captain Phillips , Paul Greengrass' white-knuckle reenactment of the 2009 hijacking of a U.S.-flagged freighter in the Arabian Sea, four Somali pirates take the bridge of the Maersk Alabama. It is the first time that Muse , the lean, stone-eyed leader of the marauders, and Richard Phillips , the mariner in charge of the giant container vessel, meet. And for Greengrass, it was a doubly crucial moment.
SPORTS
July 4, 2013
Somali Lemonade rallied from the middle of the pack and held off Miz Ida through the final sixteenth of a mile to win the $250,000 Dr. James Penny Memorial Handicap by a half-length Tuesday at Parx Racing. The winner finished the 1 1/16-mile test in 1 minute, 47.83 seconds. Under jockey Joel Rosario, Somali Lemonade paid $15.40, $6.20 and $3.20 in the Grade III race. Miz Ida paid $4.60 and $2.80. Pianist won in a photo finish over last year's runner-up, Hessonite, and paid $2.20 to show.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - The 2011 Somali famine killed an estimated 260,000 people, according to a new report to be published this week, officials told the Associated Press. The total more than doubles previous estimates, and half of the victims were age 5 and younger. The aid community believes tens of thousands of people died needlessly because the international community was slow to respond to early signs of approaching hunger in East Africa in late 2010 and early 2011. The toll was also exacerbated by extremist militants from al-Shabab who banned food-aid deliveries to the areas of south-central Somalia that they controlled.
NEWS
September 2, 2012 | By Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - When she was 17, Samia Yusuf Omar experienced a brief moment in the international spotlight when she ran a 200-meter race representing Somalia at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. Omar finished far behind other sprinters in her qualifying heat, but as a female athlete competing in the Olympics for Somalia, a country known mainly for being a failed state, she made headlines. She also got hooked on a dream: Omar wanted to train as a runner and compete internationally for her country, and to earn money to support her family.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Abdi Guled, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Defections from the al-Qaeda-linked extremist group al-Shabab are accelerating as Somalian and African Union troops take new territory around the capital, officials in Somalia say. Extremists who abandon al-Shabab risk retaliatory assassinations from fighters still loyal to the militia, but a government-run program in Mogadishu houses several hundred former fighters, many of them teenagers. It provides meals, housing, and courses on patriotism, religion, and antiviolence.
NEWS
December 24, 2011
Prince Philip, 90, gets heart stent LONDON - Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, underwent surgery Friday for a blocked coronary artery, royal officials said. A spokeswoman for Buckingham Palace said Philip, 90, would remain in the hospital for "a short time" for observation after the "very minimally invasive procedure" to implant a coronary stent. She would not say whether other members of the royal family were with the Duke of Edinburgh and declined to comment further, speaking on customary condition of anonymity.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Abdi Guled and Katharine Houreld, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Somali militants on Monday threatened to bring down Nairobi skyscrapers after Kenya sent hundreds of troops into Somalia. The threat emanated from the same lawless country in which the al-Qaeda masterminds behind 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies sought refuge. The Kenyan invasion comes at a time when al-Shabab has been weakened by famine in its strongholds, pushed from the capital of Mogadishu by African Union troops and finds itself increasingly challenged by clan militias.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Brock Vergakis, Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. - A pair of Somalian men were sentenced to life in prison Monday for their roles in the hijacking of a yacht that left all four Americans on board dead. One of the men argued he had unsuccessfully tried to persuade his fellow pirates that the two women on board should be released. The owners of the Quest, Jean and Scott Adam of Marina del Rey, Calif., along with friends Bob Riggle and Phyllis Macay of Seattle, were shot to death in February several days after being taken hostage several hundred miles south of Oman.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOGADISHU, SOMALIA - Sacks of grain, peanut-butter snacks and other food staples meant for starving Somalis are being stolen and sold in markets, an Associated Press investigation has found, raising concerns that thieving businessmen are undermining international famine-relief efforts in this nearly lawless country. The U.N.'s World Food Program acknowledged for the first time that it has been investigating food theft in Somalia for two months. The WFP strongly condemned any diversion of "even the smallest amount of food from starving and vulnerable Somalis.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|