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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The pulse of an incoming call waiting keeps breaking into our phone interview, so I offer to pause on hold. But Mark Tropea, the chef and owner of Sonata in Northern Liberties, doesn't flinch after a glance at caller ID. "It's a bill collector," he says. "They can wait for you. " Ah, that "wait" - for more customers, for enough momentum to turn a profit, for praise (or, failing that, just recognition that Sonata exists ) - it's a potentially numbing state of off-the-radar limbo that Tropea has refined with admirable determination.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
Hyundai made an impressive sales debut in this country by putting an attractive Georgio Giugiaro body on stale Mitsubishi technology and calling it an Excel. Now, it has complemented that subcompact piece of day-old bread with a bigger, fresher loaf named Sonata. The Sonata is a midsize sedan aimed at the family bus buyer. It competes with midsize four-doors like the Plymouth Acclaim, as well as compact sedans like the Chevy Corsica, Honda Accord and Toyota Camry. As it did with the Excel, the South Korean manufacturer is pitching price with the Sonata.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Malcolm Bilson has been near the front in the search for the true sound of Mozart's piano music. The search is, of course, impossible, since central heating, the internal combustion engine, new diets, rising noise levels and advances in medicine have made it impossible to recapture fully the sense or sound of the late 18th century in Vienna. Bilson comes close, since he plays a handsome Philip Belt instrument, a re- creation of the fortepiano Mozart used, and has dug deeply into the keyboard performance practice of the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In this fiddle-rich town, Ju-Young Baek's recital Sunday afternoon made history of sorts - with the violinist's playing the complete solo sonatas of Eugene Ysaye. The program marked Baek's professional debut in Philadelphia; curiously, it also was the professional debut for the sonatas that Ysaye began composing in the late 19th century and which are considered a stunning bridge into the 20th. The Belgian composer was a remarkable virtuoso, pedagogue and champion of new music. His six sonatas make fearsome demands on interpreters, but Baek, a 21-year-old South Korean native and graduate of the Curtis Institute, made light of their technical requirements, playing with a poise that was always musical.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph de Pasquale, principal violist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, gave a disappointing recital with Vladimir Sokoloff at the piano at Curtis Hall in Center City yesterday afternoon. For whatever reason, these two musicians, clearly capable of much better, just did not seem to have their hearts in the program, and their performances were both perfunctory and clearly under-rehearsed. The lion's share of their attention appeared to have been devoted to the long-winded and only intermittently convincing viola sonata of Arnold Bax, which dominated the proceedings both by its length and by its central position on the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Charting Beethoven's evolution from being the most genial guardian of the classical style to its executioner is an exercise done vividly and not infrequently through the string quartets and piano sonatas. But Peter Wiley and Anna Polonsky took audiences through the story from the vantage point of the cello sonata Sunday afternoon. Presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society in two concerts at the American Philosophical Society, at 3 and 6 p.m., it was hardly a marathon (at least for the audience)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
A string quartet on a diet? A violin sonata on steroids? However you heard Monday's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert of music for two violins, it wasn't anything typical. What looked like an enterprising but oddball program of Leclair, Milhaud, and Kreisler at the American Philosophical Society turned out to be something that really needed to be heard. With their intensive, ongoing professional association, David Kim and Juliette Kang (respectively, the concertmaster and first associate concertmaster of the Philadelphia Orchestra)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Main Line cornered the market on extraordinary piano playing over the weekend when Richard Goode played at the Haverford School's Centennial Hall - and, then, over in Roberts Hall at Haverford College, Russian pianist Tatyana Nikolaeva made a much-belated debut appearance. Goode played Beethoven sonatas Sunday afternoon; the night before, Nikolaeva interpreted preludes and fugues by J.S. Bach and Shostakovich. With programs like that, how could a piano aficionado go wrong? Nor can you ever go astray listening to an artist of Goode's caliber.
NEWS
February 1, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Lambert Orkis, pianist, and David Hardy, cellist, brought to a satisfying conclusion yesterday a valuable survey of Beethoven's complete works for piano and cello, a twin program they began at the Ethical Society Jan. 17. Traversing the range of the composer's three periods, the musicians offered the early (1798) Twelve Variations on the theme "Ein Madchen oder Weibchen" From Mozart's "Die Zauberflote," his middle-period (1808) Sonata in A major (Op. 69), and the companion Sonata in C major (Op. 102, No. 1)
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Haydn Sonata in B flat major (Hob. 41) and Sonata in G major (Hob. 40) were intended for performance in the home rather than public venues, pianist Andrew Willis said during his recital Sunday night at the Laurel Hill Mansion in Fairmount Park. The sonatas have only two movements each, instead of the standard three, sometimes four. And their relative briefness and design for performance in intimate locales have led to their designation as "the sonatas for ladies," Willis said.
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NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Most siblings look back on a childhood of pick-up football games and getting into scrapes together. Ashley, Daniel, and Andrew Hsu, on the other hand, may remember the time they played Beethoven's last three piano sonatas on a single program while still students at the Curtis Institute of Music. That time was Wednesday night in Field Concert Hall. They could have chosen a strand of Beethoven bagatelles, or taken turns with the Goldberg Variations, if the only point had been to play up the familial connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Charting Beethoven's evolution from being the most genial guardian of the classical style to its executioner is an exercise done vividly and not infrequently through the string quartets and piano sonatas. But Peter Wiley and Anna Polonsky took audiences through the story from the vantage point of the cello sonata Sunday afternoon. Presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society in two concerts at the American Philosophical Society, at 3 and 6 p.m., it was hardly a marathon (at least for the audience)
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The timing could not have been predicted or contrived. Just as Russian/American relations veer toward breakdown over the annexation of Crimea, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society presented a concert of Sergei Prokofiev's three so-called War Sonatas - Nos. 6-8, Opp 82-84 - a surprisingly overt reaction to Stalin's purges of the 1940s, played by a pianist with a certain family history of Russian persecution, Ignat Solzhenitsyn. Whatever the influence of current events on Solzhenitsyn's performance Thursday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, the impact on the audience was immeasurable.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonidas Kavakos is a marvel of exactitude. There's a Leonardo da Vinci-like quality to his playing, as if you could plot mathematically how every micro move accounts for his elegance and efficiency. In this extraordinary violinist, artist and master technician coexist in polished communion. If a listener Tuesday night had to strain a bit to hear that which is human, it was understandable. In his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Kimmel Center of four Beethoven sonatas, Kavakos was sometimes a cool customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
A string quartet on a diet? A violin sonata on steroids? However you heard Monday's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert of music for two violins, it wasn't anything typical. What looked like an enterprising but oddball program of Leclair, Milhaud, and Kreisler at the American Philosophical Society turned out to be something that really needed to be heard. With their intensive, ongoing professional association, David Kim and Juliette Kang (respectively, the concertmaster and first associate concertmaster of the Philadelphia Orchestra)
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Those who were most engaged by Stewart Goodyear's all-day Beethoven Sonatathon on Saturday were the most likely to take breaks from it. The closer you get to the music, the more it demands from you, particularly with hearing all 32 in dense succession in a single day. So the in-and-out traffic at the McCarter's full Berlind Theatre at the afternoon installment (one of three) was understandable. Beethoven ain't easy. Some followed Goodyear's performances with scores - even bringing minilamps.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The 32 Beethoven piano sonatas - often called the New Testament of keyboard music - track the epic journey from brash youth to Olympian serenity of one of Western Civilization's towering personalities. However tantalizing, the idea of hearing them all on a single day seems impossible. Surely, one wouldn't have expected such an endeavor from Stewart Goodyear, 35, the Curtis Institute graduate best known for Gershwin. Nonetheless, he'll perform all 32 sonatas Saturday in three chronological installments - 10 a.m., 3 p.m., and 8 p.m. - at Princeton's McCarter Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven's cello sonatas are not often done as a complete, chronological cycle: They run too long for a single concert, but not long enough to fill two concerts without adding some of the composer's non-sonata cello works, diluting the sense of progression in his musical thought. When performed in close to optimum, single-concert circumstances by cellist Efe Baltacigil and pianist Benjamin Hochman on Thursday at the American Philosophical Society, the sonatas came off as a motley collection - verbose in the early works, oblique in the later ones, and with a clear-cut masterpiece in the middle, the Cello Sonata No. 3 (Op. 69 )
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012
2012 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid: A family sedan delivering 35 mpg. Not a bad combination. Or is it? Price : $31,485 as tested, including a $5,500 ultimate package (details later). Marketer's pitch: "Brains. Brawn. Beauty. " Conventional wisdom: Consumer Reports says, "The hybrid version is unrefined. " Reality: CR is right. Two modes: By now everyone not living under a rock probably knows that a hybrid marries a gasoline engine with an electric motor.
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