CollectionsSonny Stitt
IN THE NEWS

Sonny Stitt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 28, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jazz drummer Billy James, 73, who began playing with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra at 15 and went on to entertain fans across the nation before finally settling in Philadelphia, died at Mercy Hospital Nov. 20. Death was caused by complications from asthma, according to Danita Garrison Lyburn, his longtime companion. Mr. James played with jazz greats such as Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis and Sonny Stitt, and was a longtime mainstay at Philadelphia jazz clubs, including Ortlieb's Jazzhaus and Chris' Jazz Cafe.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Among the artists appearing on Tony "TNT" Jones' first CD, "Beyond the Dream," are Sister Sledge. You may know all the words to "We Are Family," but do you remember the Sisters' names? Come up with them and we'll send you a Big Fat Friday T-shirt. Mail or bring your entry to Big Fat Friday Contest, Philadelphia Daily News, Box 7788 (400 N. Broad St.), Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. (Or fax: 215-854-5852.) Entries must be received by next Thursday; 10 winners will be selected. You must include your name, address and phone number to be eligible.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Bird, Clint Eastwood considered Charlie Parker and a paradox that recurs all too often in the lives and deaths of legendary jazz musicians: The incandescent fire of genius and creativity proved to be the very thing that destroyed them. Drug-addicted, self-destructive artists such as Parker, Thelonious Monk or Chet Baker offer such a strong dramatic profile that their enduring music becomes as much a metaphor as an expression of their anguish. Sometimes, it's refreshing to just kick back and listen to what they left us, and there is a literally priceless opportunity to do just that in An Evening at Birdland.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Jazz Columnist
The name is Buster - Buster Williams - and that's the long and the short of it. Buster says that any reference to Charles Anthony Williams, the name handed out to the nonpareil bassist when he arrived in this world, is more properly the turf of his late daddy, who traded professionally as Cholly Williams. Cholly Williams played a lot of bass hereabouts, 1930s through '50s, and he is the logical place to begin any story about Buster. Cholly lived in Camden and worked day and night to support his brood of five - four daughters and Buster.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
When you reach a certain age, "new" becomes boring and "old" becomes enticing - as it was when new. And it's in the old where Tommy Flanagan flourishes on "Sea Changes," his recent release from Evidence Music Inc., the Conshohocken jazz and blues label. Flanagan, 67, the best bebop pianist working today, reaches back 40 years to re-record tunes from the first album he recorded as a leader, 1957's "Overseas. " It's paradoxical that a pianist so dedicated to making others sound good - he was a sideman for, among others, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane, and accompanied singers Tony Bennett and Ella Fitzgerald - could still carve out a signature sound that combines elegance with finger-popping swing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It would be hard to find a more appropriate performer than Wendell Harrison to conclude the "Back to the Roots" series of concerts and workshops that began in March under the auspices of the Mill Creek Jazz and Cultural Society and the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum. The chief purpose of the project was to introduce jazz to youngsters whose musical influences never quite got around to jazz, according to Ron Wynn, director of the Mill Creek organization. He added that many of their parents fit into the same category.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1992 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A tribute to the memory and music of tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley is on the bill at the Jazz Loft at the Mill Creek Jazz & Cultural Society tonight, the final event in the current "Back to the Roots" series. It looks to be a good one. They're calling it "No Room for Squares," the title of one of Mobley's best-known numbers. Mobley, who died in 1986 at the age of 55, had more than 300 compositions to his credit. Throughout his career, Mobley played with many of the jazz greats, including Miles Davis, Art Blakey, Max Roach, Lee Morgan and Horace Silver.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1986 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Two highly unusual solo piano concerts highlight this week's jazz calendar: Sun Ra at the Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine St., on Sunday and Dr. John at Grendel's Lair Cabaret, 500 South St., on Monday. What makes Ra's solo concert at the Bride especially appealing is that he usually doesn't get an opportunity to show off his pianistics with his Arkestra. Ra plays what is commonly referred to as "arranger's piano. " No one is likely to mistake him for Keith Jarrett, but that's a point in his favor.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Singer-bandleader Billy Eckstine made beautiful music and music history during his more than 50-year career. The 78-year-old singer and bandleader died yesterday at Montefiore Hospital. He had suffered a stroke last month. Eckstine's warm baritone graced a string of 40's and 50's hits, such as "I Apologize" and "Prisoner of Love. " Known to his fans as "Mr. B," Eckstine sang romantic ballads in a strong, vibrant baritone, with impeccable diction. He was one of America's most popular singers in the late 1940s and early 50's, and the first black singer to make the cover of Life magazine and to become a national sex symbol.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
THIS TOWN has laid claim to many a jazz legend - from John Coltrane, Stan Getz and Dizzy Gillespie on down - and it used to be crawling with night spots where the talents could hone their chops. Today, you can count the clubs on one hand. Yet, there are still "at least 500 jazz musicians in the area, of all ages, trying to find work. " So says Suzanne Cloud, executive director and co-founder of the Jazz Bridge Project, now Philadelphia's most prolific nonprofit presenter of jazz and blues.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
As 16-year-old Alex Wood plays the jazz standard "Misty" on the piano, bassist Buster Williams hangs on every note. But it is the absence of sound he is listening for. "Allow the space and the air in the music to be part of the improvisation," says Williams - brow furrowed, bass resting on his shoulder - in the auditorium of Abington Friends School. Williams, 70, is a living legend of jazz, a sideman who has jammed with the likes of Miles Davis, Count Basie, Herbie Hancock, Sarah Vaughan, and Nancy Wilson.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | BY JOHN F. Morrison
WHEN THE late Frank Rizzo was Philadelphia police commissioner, he wanted Donald Wilson to be his bodyguard. Although Don was fond of Rizzo, he had to turn him down. "I'm sorry," he said, "but I have music to play. " Don was a devoted cop for 22 years, but his first love was music — jazz, to be specific. He was a virtuoso on the piano and trumpet, and played in the police band and at the jazz clubs that once flourished in Philly, performing with John Coltrane and other notables of the jazz world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
THIS TOWN has laid claim to many a jazz legend - from John Coltrane, Stan Getz and Dizzy Gillespie on down - and it used to be crawling with night spots where the talents could hone their chops. Today, you can count the clubs on one hand. Yet, there are still "at least 500 jazz musicians in the area, of all ages, trying to find work. " So says Suzanne Cloud, executive director and co-founder of the Jazz Bridge Project, now Philadelphia's most prolific nonprofit presenter of jazz and blues.
NEWS
November 28, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jazz drummer Billy James, 73, who began playing with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra at 15 and went on to entertain fans across the nation before finally settling in Philadelphia, died at Mercy Hospital Nov. 20. Death was caused by complications from asthma, according to Danita Garrison Lyburn, his longtime companion. Mr. James played with jazz greats such as Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis and Sonny Stitt, and was a longtime mainstay at Philadelphia jazz clubs, including Ortlieb's Jazzhaus and Chris' Jazz Cafe.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Saxophonists Sam Reed and Stan Wilson carry strong Philly credentials. Reed hails from South Philadelphia, where he hung out with friends such as drummer Albert "Tootie" Heath, trumpeter Ted Curson and pianist Bobby Timmons. Wilson, comes from North Philly, a product of the Simon Gratz High School band, friend to players like trumpeter Lee Morgan and bassist Reggie Workman. On Sunday, Reed, 62, and Wilson, 60, are the focus of "Last Man Standing," a show billed as "a stomp-down, drag-out, call-the-cops Battle of the Tenor Saxes.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
When you reach a certain age, "new" becomes boring and "old" becomes enticing - as it was when new. And it's in the old where Tommy Flanagan flourishes on "Sea Changes," his recent release from Evidence Music Inc., the Conshohocken jazz and blues label. Flanagan, 67, the best bebop pianist working today, reaches back 40 years to re-record tunes from the first album he recorded as a leader, 1957's "Overseas. " It's paradoxical that a pianist so dedicated to making others sound good - he was a sideman for, among others, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane, and accompanied singers Tony Bennett and Ella Fitzgerald - could still carve out a signature sound that combines elegance with finger-popping swing.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Among the artists appearing on Tony "TNT" Jones' first CD, "Beyond the Dream," are Sister Sledge. You may know all the words to "We Are Family," but do you remember the Sisters' names? Come up with them and we'll send you a Big Fat Friday T-shirt. Mail or bring your entry to Big Fat Friday Contest, Philadelphia Daily News, Box 7788 (400 N. Broad St.), Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. (Or fax: 215-854-5852.) Entries must be received by next Thursday; 10 winners will be selected. You must include your name, address and phone number to be eligible.
NEWS
October 6, 1997 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
John Wesley Farrell, a jazz musician and teacher, died of complications of cancer Sunday. He was 80 and lived in South Philadelphia. John Farrell was also known as John Ferrell and Omar Kane Bey. His family called him "Buster. " He played bass and guitar with the Eddie Cole [brother of Nat King Cole] Trio for several years, traveling throughout the country. He also performed with Charlie Parker, Frank Mobley, Mary Lou Williams, Sonny Stitt, the Mills Brothers and the Ink Spots.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Singer-bandleader Billy Eckstine made beautiful music and music history during his more than 50-year career. The 78-year-old singer and bandleader died yesterday at Montefiore Hospital. He had suffered a stroke last month. Eckstine's warm baritone graced a string of 40's and 50's hits, such as "I Apologize" and "Prisoner of Love. " Known to his fans as "Mr. B," Eckstine sang romantic ballads in a strong, vibrant baritone, with impeccable diction. He was one of America's most popular singers in the late 1940s and early 50's, and the first black singer to make the cover of Life magazine and to become a national sex symbol.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC This story includes information from Inquirer wire services
Billy Eckstine, 78, the prototypical romantic crooner whose robust baritone made every song a moment of trembling, heart-wrenching trauma, died of cardiac arrest yesterday in Pittsburgh's Montefiore Hospital. During the height of his popularity in the late '40s and early '50s, Eckstine was known for his smooth vocals and sex-symbol image. Many young men imitated his style of dress (shirts with rolled collars, jackets draped casually over the frame). "He was a dandy man, a matinee idol who set a trend in the style of menswear," singer Abbey Lincoln said yesterday.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|