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FOOD
September 26, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
There's no question that DAT is now the tape medium of choice for audiophiles and professional musicians. But will the rest of us music-loving mortals follow suit? Pop superstar Phil Collins uses his Aiwa HDS-1 portable digital audio tape recorder to review the two track mixes of his latest studio efforts. "It gives you the same quality of sound as a compact disc, so there are no surprises later on," he says. Wander through the official tapers' section at a Grateful Dead concert and you'll see a remarkable proliferation of professional grade ($2,500-$3,500)
NEWS
May 31, 2013
1TRINITRON TV (1968) Older TV-picture tubes used three separate color "guns. " Sony put 'em all together, sharpening and brightening the image - a pinnacle of TV performance that held firm for decades. 2BETAMAX (1975) The first commercially successful home-video recording system introduced the concept of "time-shifted viewing. " Scared the hell out of Hollywood, until it made them billions. 3WALKMAN (1979) The earliest high-fidelity headphone stereo portable used a medium - the compact cassette - that inventor Philips had imagined was strictly for dictation.
FOOD
May 2, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The folks from Sony had reason to beam at their recent product unveiling in New York. An annual survey conducted by Television Digest had just named Sony the No. 1 seller of video camcorders in the U.S. This was some comeback given Sony's past misfortunes with Betamax and given that the company accomplished the feat solely with camcorders in the upstart 8-mm. format. Also cause for Sony celebration was a fresh crop of innovative video products - ranging from a credit card-sized TV remote control to user-friendly camcorders and VCRs, with Sony's first consumer video-still printer and some smashing new TV sets.
NEWS
December 18, 2014
THE FUN WE'RE all having reading the embarrassing emails of Hollywood big shots is tempered by the fact that we really shouldn't be seeing them at all. The hacked Sony emails arise (very probably) from an attack by a foreign government. It's (very probably) a form a terrorism, it's illegal and death threats have been made, and that's unacceptable. Hollywood screenwriter Aaron Sorkin said as much recently when he labeled as "morally treasonous" and "spectacularly dishonorable" anyone who publishes the emails.
LIVING
June 23, 1994 | By Mike Capuzzo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, USA Today and InStyle Magazine
Music industry insiders are calling Sony's victory in a London court Tuesday over pop star George Michael a suit the record companies couldn't afford to lose. A ruling in Michael's favor would have left the door open for other artists to file similar challenges and escape their own contracts, said Stan Soocher, an entertainment attorney and editor of the journal Entertainment Law and Finance. "If record companies can't be assured of keeping artists for some time, they can't build up a catalogue," said Soocher.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Some advances in consumer electronics are so innovative and important that merely reading about them can't convey their significance. The delights of a camcorder aren't fully apparent until you've had one on your shoulder. The sound purity of the compact disc is only an abstraction until you've experienced it. So it is with Sony's marvelous little (though costly) gadget, the Video Walkman. This combination TV/VCR, which weighs 2 1/2 pounds and is the size of a large paperback, has been around for about a year, but it has yet to make much of an impression on the public at large.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
HIGH-DEFINITION TVs roughly quadrupled the resolution of the sets that came before them. Now, the industry is poised to do it again. By December, U.S. stores will sell a TV set with four times the resolution of today's best HDTVs, Sony Corp. said Wednesday. The set will measure 84 inches on the diagonal, making the screen area four times as large as the common 42-inch set. Its price will be revealed next week. There is, for now, very little video content available that can take advantage of the higher resolution.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
DAN STERLING , "the guy that brought down Sony," is from West Philadelphia. So wrote 24/7 Molly Eichel on philly.com yesterday. Sterling, you see, is the fella who wrote "The Interview," the film at the center of the Sony hacking scandal. The movie, which now may never be seen, stars James Franco and Seth Rogen as TV journalists tasked with assassinating North Korean leader Kim Jong-un . Sony canceled the theatrical release after hacker group Guardians of Peace threatened an attack on theaters screening the film.
NEWS
February 27, 2003 | By Bob Holt
If you work for a company for a long time, you will meet a lot of personalities. Sometimes you put in so many hours at your job that you see your coworkers more than your family. Many people have been fortunate enough to consider the colleagues at their workplace an extended family. I am one of those. At Sony Music in Pitman, our plant this month lost one of its family members. Mechanic Paul David Carr was repairing a truck when it slid off its lift and struck him. A few brave souls who were nearby remained composed enough to provide Paul with the best available assistance, but it was too late.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1988 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
This month, Sony delivered on what was implied three years ago when it introduced its first products using the tiny 8mm video format. Behold the complete hand-held video system known as the Video Walkman. With this 2 1/2-pound combination color TV-VCR, you can watch VHF and UHF television. You can view a prerecorded 8mm movie (they're out there somewhere). You can visit VHS-owning friends and copy their home tapes for your screen. And you can record a TV broadcast for later viewing, on the Video Walkman screen or by connecting it to a TV set. The Video Walkman's potential is dazzling.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sure, it probably would have made $25 mil had we not been all 9/11-threatened by who-knows-who, but Sony Pictures is grateful The Interview brought in $1 million in ticket sales on Christmas Day. The limited release in 331 theaters got a "fantastic" audience reaction, said Rory Bruer , Sony's president of worldwide distribution. The film, controversial because it depicts a fictional assassination attempt against North Korean leader Kim Jong Un , was also made available through on-demand platforms - YouTube Movies, Google Play, Xbox Video, and its own site www.seetheinterview.com - starting Christmas Eve. Sales figures for the on-demand market were not available.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014
YES, VIRGINIA, there is a Santa Claus. That's what the makers of "The Interview" have to be thinking, now that Sony has announced a limited theatrical release of the controversial comedy. After hackers made terror threats, Sony pulled the film. Critics including President Obama cried foul, citing First Amendment issues. Yesterday, moviegoers got word that Sony had done an about-face and had agreed to allow the movie to be shown starting on Christmas Day after all. The movie giant did not immediately say how many theaters would show the film, but it's expected that "The Interview" will open in fewer than the wide release originally planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News
TALK ABOUT blurring the lines between real life and reel life. Sony Pictures, which is having a Month From Hell for the ages, has enlisted the help of the spin-mistress who was the inspiration for the ABC prime-time soaper "Scandal. " The company that produced (and won't release) "The Interview" has asked Judy Smith to help with damage control in the wake of the cyberattack it suffered (apparently at the hands of North Korea), and its subsequent decision to keep the Seth Rogen - James Franco comedy about killing North Korean Big Cheese Kim Jong Un from public display.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985 Yesterday
CYBER TERRORISM reached Hollywood big time this past week, what with a group of hackers, believe to orginate from North Korea, taunting Sony Pictures Entertainment by releasing information, emails, etc. stolen from the company and threating employees and their families if the movie studio didn't stop the release of the controversial movie "The Interview. " Sony pulled the flick resulting in a debate over free speech in Hollywood and the rest of the country. Enjoy the trip to Celebrityville.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Thanks to Sony's quick and craven cancellation of its release of The Interview , the few critics who saw the movie in advance became not just the stiffs paid to watch this stuff, but also one of Hollywood's most exclusive audiences ever. So what did they think? Scott Foundas wrote in Variety that the film, which has drawn electronic attacks and threats tentatively linked to North Korea, is "about as funny as a communist food shortage, and just as protracted. " Referring to the coarse comedy favored by stars Seth Rogen and James Franco, Jordan Hoffman began his review in the Guardian by addressing "what's front and center on the screen: butts.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
DAN STERLING , "the guy that brought down Sony," is from West Philadelphia. So wrote 24/7 Molly Eichel on philly.com yesterday. Sterling, you see, is the fella who wrote "The Interview," the film at the center of the Sony hacking scandal. The movie, which now may never be seen, stars James Franco and Seth Rogen as TV journalists tasked with assassinating North Korean leader Kim Jong-un . Sony canceled the theatrical release after hacker group Guardians of Peace threatened an attack on theaters screening the film.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
SONY SCHMARONY. This week, when celeb watchers weren't obsessing over Amy Pascal , James Franco , Seth Rogen , Kevin Hart and the guy who played Spider-Man, we were ogling mysterious Jennifer Lawrence associate Justin Riblet , without knowing who he was. Turns out, he's Philly's own hometown hero. Sorta. J-Law and J-Rib turned heads a few days ago when he accompanied her to LAX. Wonderers speculated whether he could be a romantic liaison. Wonderers wondered wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014
THERE'S NO QUESTION the massive breach of Sony Pictures' computer system has provided a degree of titillation and amusement along with massive grief and paranoia for all concerned. But things took a dark and frightening turn yesterday when those behind the unprecedented hack (self-identified in an Orwellian manner as the "Guardians of Peace") threatened a "9/11"-style attack on movie theaters that screen "The Interview. " The film, which rolls out nationwide on Christmas Day, stars Seth Rogen and James Franco as TV gossip-show reporters who land an interview with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un , only to be asked by the CIA to assassinate him. It is generally believed that Sony's financing of the comedy is what provoked the Guardians to hack and leak the company's computer files.
NEWS
December 18, 2014
THE FUN WE'RE all having reading the embarrassing emails of Hollywood big shots is tempered by the fact that we really shouldn't be seeing them at all. The hacked Sony emails arise (very probably) from an attack by a foreign government. It's (very probably) a form a terrorism, it's illegal and death threats have been made, and that's unacceptable. Hollywood screenwriter Aaron Sorkin said as much recently when he labeled as "morally treasonous" and "spectacularly dishonorable" anyone who publishes the emails.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
THE CYBERATTACK against Sony Pictures may have uncovered a lot of embarrassing dirty laundry from studio executives, but now things are getting serious. It's affected James Bond. The producers of the Bond films have acknowledged that an early version of the screenplay for the next Bond movie, "Spectre," was among the material stolen in the Sony hack. The producers said in a statement Saturday that they are concerned that third parties who received the screenplay might seek to publish it - and warned that the material is subject to copyright protection around the world.
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