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NEWS
January 10, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - Richard Hopkins, a British television producer who helped bring "Dancing With the Stars" to the United States, has died. He was 47. Hopkins died Saturday in Britain after an 8-month battle with cancer, Sony Music said in a statement yesterday. Over his 20-year career, Hopkins produced "Fame Academy" and "Fear Factor" in Britain, and worked on the first series of reality show "Big Brother" before developing, pitching and producing popular dance contest "Strictly Come Dancing" for the BBC. He then brought the format to America, where the show was rechristened "Dancing With the Stars.
NEWS
December 15, 1992 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The vision of a waterfront performance amphitheater in Camden is about to become reality. State officials said yesterday that the Florio administration had reached agreement with the developers of a planned 25,000-seat outdoor performing arts center near the new state aquarium, across the Delaware River from Penns Landing. Tomorrow morning, Gov. Florio and the developers, the Sony Music/PACE Partnership, are expected to announce their plans at the site. State officials hope the outdoor center, which would sponsor more than 40 concerts a year, will serve as a catalyst for economic development in the struggling area.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden activists threatened yesterday that residents would block a $38 million amphitheater planned for Camden's downtown waterfront unless they got a larger "piece of the action. " "We will not let the project move forward unless the community moves forward with it," activist Roy Jones said at a sparsely attended hearing of the Casino Reinvestment Authority (CRA) in Camden City Council chambers yesterday. He said residents would turn to demonstrations and boycotts if not satisfied.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
A RECENT column ("Pay for Play," Aug. 25) treated readers to a generous amount of record-label spin regarding legislation in Washington that would require local radio stations to pay an additional licensing fee - a performance tax - for every song aired free to listeners. While characterizing the debate as one between stations and musicians, you glossed over the fact that the group bankrolling this campaign is none other than the Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the four largest record labels in the world.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | By Matt White, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondent Brian Thevenot contributed to this report
Columbia House, a national mail-order music club, said yesterday it would close its Pitman warehouse operation Nov. 15, throwing 160 people out of work. Columbia House will consolidate the Gloucester County operation with those in Terre Haute, Ind., and Colorado City, Colo., said John Habets, vice president for human resources for Columbia House, which is based in Indiana. Pitman is the smallest of the recorded-music company's three national distribution centers, with just 4 percent of the company's operational workforce, Habets said.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No one expects conventional behavior from Michael Jackson. But the singer considered one of the most eccentric figures in show business has stunned everyone with his latest pose: labor activist and sidewalk protester. Jackson - who has recently accused Sony Music, in general, and the label president Tommy Mottola, in particular, of sabotaging sales of his 2001 album Invincible - has aligned himself with an advocacy group formed by attorney Johnnie Cochran Jr. and the Rev. Al Sharpton to address discrimination and unfair business practices in the recording industry.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The president of the local business association supervised the packing department at Columbia House for a year in 1974, working while he went to college. Somebody else thinks he knows somebody who has worked there for 23 years. The Pitman construction office has records that date to 1959. Columbia House, the mail-order music-club giant, has been a part of Pitman for a long, long time. How much longer it will be so is a different matter. The date has been set - Nov. 15 - when Columbia House will close its warehouse, costing 160 workers their jobs.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
IS KIMORA LEE Simmons secretly married? Ex-hubby Russell Simmons , daddy to the onetime pair's two daughters, Ming , 14, and Aoki , 11, tweeted so. The music mogul has stayed superfriendly with his former model/clothing designer ex, and his electronic message may have been meant to dispel rumors that Kimora Lee's involved with rapper Birdman , who just this week called the former Mrs. Simmons "luv of my life" via Instagram....
LIVING
May 16, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
So this is what George Michael meant by artistic freedom. On "Star People," one of 11 moderately inspired songs on his just-released Older (DreamWorks), the former teen heartthrob opens by complaining, obviously from firsthand knowledge, about spoiled celebrities. But his holier-than-thou routine turns bitter by the final verse: "Nothing comes for nothing, baby. That fame and fortune's heaven-sent. And who gives a f- about your problems, darling, when you can pay the rent?" Oh, George!
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
A major record label in a Philadelphia suburb? New York is home to most of the recording industry. All the major labels have offices there, where executives work behind locked glass doors in towering skyscrapers. Visitors have to pass muster with security and a receptionist, and trying to get an appointment with a major-label CEO is akin to trying to get a meeting with President Clinton. At Ruffhouse Records, none of that is true. The company is housed in a modest three-story building in Conshohocken.
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NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
IS KIMORA LEE Simmons secretly married? Ex-hubby Russell Simmons , daddy to the onetime pair's two daughters, Ming , 14, and Aoki , 11, tweeted so. The music mogul has stayed superfriendly with his former model/clothing designer ex, and his electronic message may have been meant to dispel rumors that Kimora Lee's involved with rapper Birdman , who just this week called the former Mrs. Simmons "luv of my life" via Instagram....
NEWS
January 10, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - Richard Hopkins, a British television producer who helped bring "Dancing With the Stars" to the United States, has died. He was 47. Hopkins died Saturday in Britain after an 8-month battle with cancer, Sony Music said in a statement yesterday. Over his 20-year career, Hopkins produced "Fame Academy" and "Fear Factor" in Britain, and worked on the first series of reality show "Big Brother" before developing, pitching and producing popular dance contest "Strictly Come Dancing" for the BBC. He then brought the format to America, where the show was rechristened "Dancing With the Stars.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
A RECENT column ("Pay for Play," Aug. 25) treated readers to a generous amount of record-label spin regarding legislation in Washington that would require local radio stations to pay an additional licensing fee - a performance tax - for every song aired free to listeners. While characterizing the debate as one between stations and musicians, you glossed over the fact that the group bankrolling this campaign is none other than the Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the four largest record labels in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Music in Philadelphia is a high-stakes enterprise. Justin Timberlake and Mariah Carey recorded recent work here. And since June, when Musiq, our town's latest bedroom crooner, saw his album Juslisen enter at the top of the Billboard 200, major-label talent has clogged the waiting rooms of the city's production houses. But that's only one facet of the business. A whole bunch of area artists are honing their skills the old-fashioned way - scratching for studio time, taking the lousy gigs on the lousy nights, slogging it out in clubs where pushing the envelope isn't exactly a priority.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For the Dixie Chicks, the long road Home started with Dan Rather. During an interview with the 60 Minutes II correspondent in fall 2000, Natalie Maines and sisters Martie Maguire and Emily Robison were taken aback to learn that their two chart-topping albums - which, combined, earned each woman less than $1 million - had grossed more than $200 million for Sony Music, the country-pop act's label. "We felt so stupid," said Maguire, who joined Maines and Robison in a lounge at Sony headquarters recently to talk up Home, the Chicks' all-acoustic new album.
NEWS
July 22, 2002 | By Jimi Izrael
Michael Jackson and the Rev. Al Sharpton have joined forces to fight racism, and it's the greatest show on Earth. Not since Billy Bob Thornton and Angelina Jolie have Americans been so amused and disgusted at a coupling. Who cares what their gripe is? Two media meatballs vying for a close-up makes for good television. How Jackson and Sharpton met boggles the mind (maybe at the hairdresser?) but the two have coalesced to stop inequities in the music industry that Jackson believes are predicated on race.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No one expects conventional behavior from Michael Jackson. But the singer considered one of the most eccentric figures in show business has stunned everyone with his latest pose: labor activist and sidewalk protester. Jackson - who has recently accused Sony Music, in general, and the label president Tommy Mottola, in particular, of sabotaging sales of his 2001 album Invincible - has aligned himself with an advocacy group formed by attorney Johnnie Cochran Jr. and the Rev. Al Sharpton to address discrimination and unfair business practices in the recording industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA The New York Daily News, ETOnline and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ARE THEY or are they not dating? From Tattle's view, it sure looks like J.Lo and Ben Affleck are a thang. Then again, maybe they are so close, in a "just friends" kind of way, that hanging out and shopping in a Tribeca deli is par for the course. Just last week, the photogenic pair was seen strolling about midday in Manhattan, the New York Daily News reports. Apparently Dude was searching for some item at a deli, while recently-separated Girlfriend was waiting for him, reading a newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2001 | REGINA MEDINA Staff writer Ellen Gray, New York Post and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
LOOKS LIKE troubled diva Mariah Carey needs some more R&R before she faces any softball questions from ABC newswoman Barbara Walters. The eagerly anticipated mano-a-mano, scheduled for broadcast Wednesday on "20/20," ain't happening. For now. "It's postponed at this time because she needs more time to rest," Carey's mouthpiece, Cindi Berger, told the New York Daily News. (Coincidentally, Berger also represents Walters.) Berger, however, kept mum regarding MC's current condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2001 | By JIM FARBER New York Daily News
So what drove Mariah to the brink? Exhaustion, insomnia and commercial pressures have all been cited as factors by her handlers and by the armchair shrinks of the press. But with her new CD, Mariah Carey faces something that can be just as nerve-racking: freedom. The soundtrack from her debut movie, "Glitter," finds pop's latest poster child for celebrity crackups liberated at last from what she views as the evil empire of Sony Music - ruled by her ex-benefactor/ex-husband and perceived nemesis Tommy Mottola.
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