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BUSINESS
September 18, 1989 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sorbus Inc., Bell Atlantic Corp.'s computer-maintenance subsidiary, will consolidate in a new 200,000-square-foot industrial and office building at The Commons, off Route 29 in Charlestown, Chester County. Half of the building is under construction and set to open in December. The developer of the building, Great Valley Development Corp., will add wings to the building that will be ready for Sorbus to occupy in April 1990. Sorbus plans to move 300 employees from sites in King of Prussia, Exton and Paoli to the new building, but corporate headquarters will remain in Frazer.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1988 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Bell Atlantic Corp. acknowledged yesterday that about 100 people working for its Sorbus Inc. computer-maintenance subsidiary had been laid off this week because of pressure from competitors, particularly IBM. Sorbus is based in the Chester County community of Frazer, but a Bell Atlantic spokeswoman said the layoffs had affected workers at Sorbus offices throughgout the nation. She said "fewer than five" employees locally had lost their jobs. The layoffs, which took place Tuesday, affected about 4 percent of Sorbus' workforce of 2,400 and involved mostly field engineers, sales managers and administrative employees, according to the spokeswoman, Nancy Stark.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1988 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may have been an odd route to success, but for William F. Whelan Jr. it seemed to work. Whelan has said he moved up the corporate ladder at Sorbus Inc. by making fun of his superiors and other executives at the company. As a "roastmaster" in the style of comedian Don Rickles, Whelan says, he was just one part of the entertainment designed to boost morale at company sales meetings. Among other entertainments, he said, were strippers and skits in which salesmen acted as oversexed women and in which a man dressed in a gorilla suit portrayed the "gay brother" of a Sorbus executive.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
The East Whiteland planning commission is considering proposals for five new buildings that would provide an additional 281,000 square feet of office space in the community. The five proposals were presented at the planning commission meeting Tuesday night. Final approval of the proposals rests with the East Whiteland Township Board of Supervisors. The largest of the five projects is planned by Sorbus, a Bell Atlantic subsidiary, which has applied to construct a 131,000-square-foot building connected by a bridge to its existing 110,000-square-foot structure.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 25 years, a company called Sorbus has made a sweet living out of providing tender, loving care for IBM computers and curing the ills that may befall them. By doing maintenance and repairs at prices as much as 20 percent below those charged by IBM, Sorbus has waxed so fat and healthy that it is breaking ground today for a building that will double the size of its Frazer headquarters to more than 250,000 square feet. The ground-breaking comes, however, just as IBM has begun to put the screws on the comfortable revenues and profits of third-party maintenance companies like Sorbus.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
The East Whiteland Board of Supervisors has voted unanimously to approve a major corporate-expansion plan that had the unanimous support of the Township Planning Commission. At its meeting Monday, the board voted 3-0 to allow the Sorbus Inc., a computer-maintenance subsidiary of Bell Atlantic, to add a three-story office building of 131,000 square feet on its 24 acres on Swedesford Road. Sorbus has a 110,000-square-foot building on the site. Sorbus must meet two requirements before the $12 million building can be occupied.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
For William F. Whelan, the man masquerading as a homosexual gorilla was just another in a series of high-spirited pranks he was renowned for masterminding at company roasts. But his bosses at Sorbus Inc. in Frazer went ape over the caper, Whelan contends, demoting him from eastern regional sales director to salesman. He quit last Friday and, in a suit filed yesterday in Chester County Court, he asked for compensatory and punitive damages of more than $200,000 from Sorbus, a computer-maintenance firm, and its parent company, Bell Atlantic Corp.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1988 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas A. Vassiliades, a former International Business Machines Corp. executive who joined Bell Atlantic Corp. a year ago, has been appointed president and chief executive officer at Bell Atlantic Customer Services Inc., the regional phone company's computer-maintenance subsidiary, the company announced yesterday. Vassiliades, 52, of Malvern also has been named chairman of Sorbus Inc. in Frazer, one of four divisions in the computer-maintenance operation. In each of the positions, he replaces another former IBM executive, Louis J. Ross, 59, who is retiring at his own request, the company said.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's the son of a Mummer, a Northeast Philly kid who made it big in high-tech management. Stephen J. Felice's career parallels the rapid innovations that have built, wrecked and reinvented some of America's biggest businesses since the 1980s while changing the way we talk to one another. A veteran of the Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic Corp. enterprise group that created Verizon, Felice is now the $10 million-a-year president and chief commercial officer of Dell Inc., which is struggling to remake itself from a big-but-aging computer supplier into a "global IT solutions provider.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keep it cool, keep it clean, and watch the eating, drinking and smoking. Sounds like a doctor's advice for you, but it is also good for your computer, according to Sorbus Inc., the nationwide computer-maintenance outfit based in Frazer, Chester County. Here are some pointers from Sorbus for keeping your personal computer happy: Keep the system away from sunlight, heat vents, radiators and open windows. Avoid etching, or burning a stationary image on the inner surface of the screen.
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NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's the son of a Mummer, a Northeast Philly kid who made it big in high-tech management. Stephen J. Felice's career parallels the rapid innovations that have built, wrecked and reinvented some of America's biggest businesses since the 1980s while changing the way we talk to one another. A veteran of the Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic Corp. enterprise group that created Verizon, Felice is now the $10 million-a-year president and chief commercial officer of Dell Inc., which is struggling to remake itself from a big-but-aging computer supplier into a "global IT solutions provider.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorized Distribution Network Inc., also known as Data Access Systems Inc., has acquired Recticon Corp., of Pottstown, for an undisclosed price, ADN said yesterday. Recticon, which makes silicon wafers and ingots for the semiconductor industry, had been a subsidiary of Walker International Industries Inc., of New York, since 1986, when it was purchased from Rockwell International Corp. Recticon, which has about 125 employees, had sales of about $7 million in 1989, according to ADN spokesman Jane Gardner.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1989 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Bell Atlantic Corp. said yesterday that the company had agreed to buy Control Data Corp.'s computer-maintenance business and merge it with Bell's Sorbus computer-maintenance subsidiary. The merger would increase Sorbus' customer base about 17 percent and make it the leading third-party maintenance provider for both IBM and Digital Equipment Corp. products, according to Bell Atlantic spokeswoman Stacey Mironov. Neither company would disclose the price Bell had agreed to pay for the business, which generated revenues of about $113 million last year, according to Control Data spokeswoman Nancy J. Foltz.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1989 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sorbus Inc., Bell Atlantic Corp.'s computer-maintenance subsidiary, will consolidate in a new 200,000-square-foot industrial and office building at The Commons, off Route 29 in Charlestown, Chester County. Half of the building is under construction and set to open in December. The developer of the building, Great Valley Development Corp., will add wings to the building that will be ready for Sorbus to occupy in April 1990. Sorbus plans to move 300 employees from sites in King of Prussia, Exton and Paoli to the new building, but corporate headquarters will remain in Frazer.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1988 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may have been an odd route to success, but for William F. Whelan Jr. it seemed to work. Whelan has said he moved up the corporate ladder at Sorbus Inc. by making fun of his superiors and other executives at the company. As a "roastmaster" in the style of comedian Don Rickles, Whelan says, he was just one part of the entertainment designed to boost morale at company sales meetings. Among other entertainments, he said, were strippers and skits in which salesmen acted as oversexed women and in which a man dressed in a gorilla suit portrayed the "gay brother" of a Sorbus executive.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1988 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Bell Atlantic Corp. acknowledged yesterday that about 100 people working for its Sorbus Inc. computer-maintenance subsidiary had been laid off this week because of pressure from competitors, particularly IBM. Sorbus is based in the Chester County community of Frazer, but a Bell Atlantic spokeswoman said the layoffs had affected workers at Sorbus offices throughgout the nation. She said "fewer than five" employees locally had lost their jobs. The layoffs, which took place Tuesday, affected about 4 percent of Sorbus' workforce of 2,400 and involved mostly field engineers, sales managers and administrative employees, according to the spokeswoman, Nancy Stark.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1988 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas A. Vassiliades, a former International Business Machines Corp. executive who joined Bell Atlantic Corp. a year ago, has been appointed president and chief executive officer at Bell Atlantic Customer Services Inc., the regional phone company's computer-maintenance subsidiary, the company announced yesterday. Vassiliades, 52, of Malvern also has been named chairman of Sorbus Inc. in Frazer, one of four divisions in the computer-maintenance operation. In each of the positions, he replaces another former IBM executive, Louis J. Ross, 59, who is retiring at his own request, the company said.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keep it cool, keep it clean, and watch the eating, drinking and smoking. Sounds like a doctor's advice for you, but it is also good for your computer, according to Sorbus Inc., the nationwide computer-maintenance outfit based in Frazer, Chester County. Here are some pointers from Sorbus for keeping your personal computer happy: Keep the system away from sunlight, heat vents, radiators and open windows. Avoid etching, or burning a stationary image on the inner surface of the screen.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1987 | The Inquirer Staff
Bell Atlantic Co. of Philadelphia announced yesterday that it was selling its computer-distribution and -service divisions in Canada and Frazer, Chester County, to a California firm for $148 million in cash. The predecessor of the California firm, MAI Basic Four Inc., sold those same divisions to Bell Atlantic in 1985. The Frazer portion being sold maintains MAI Basic Four computer equipment and is part of Sorbus Inc., the Bell Atlantic subsidiary. Sorbus is part of a Bell Atlantic computer-maintenance group that generated revenues of $243 million in this year's first nine months.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 25 years, a company called Sorbus has made a sweet living out of providing tender, loving care for IBM computers and curing the ills that may befall them. By doing maintenance and repairs at prices as much as 20 percent below those charged by IBM, Sorbus has waxed so fat and healthy that it is breaking ground today for a building that will double the size of its Frazer headquarters to more than 250,000 square feet. The ground-breaking comes, however, just as IBM has begun to put the screws on the comfortable revenues and profits of third-party maintenance companies like Sorbus.
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