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Sorrow

ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Like a promising matryoshka doll, Jeremy Denk's Tuesday night recital at the Kimmel Center kept revealing itself. The program's halves seemed split into the cerebral, Bach's Goldberg Variations , and the deeply personal, Schumann's Davidsbündlertänze . Each of these pieces released a series of smaller ones (18 movements in the Schumann, 32 in the Bach) from which sprang smaller and even more complex characterizations. This was a makeup recital; the pianist's October appearance for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society was washed out by Sandy, its program of Brahms and Liszt now lost.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On Good Friday, April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was shot by actor and Southern sympathizer John Wilkes Booth while he sat in his box at the Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C. The President, whose birthday is tomorrow, was moved to a private home across from the theater where he died the following day. A tearful Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, who had once referred to Lincoln as the "Illinois Ape," announced the death of the President....
NEWS
May 29, 2006 | By Gordon England
Each Memorial Day, America honors and mourns the loss of those who have given their lives to preserve our freedom and liberty. This patriotic tradition of remembering and recognizing American heroes began shortly after the Civil War. Since then, millions of Americans have served and fought, and many thousands have died in the line of duty. Like many who read this article, my life has been enriched by the freedom preserved for my generation by those who defeated the Axis powers during World War II. Another generation of Americans maintained our freedoms during the long 40 years of the Cold War and the bloody battles of Korea and Vietnam.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | By Ginny Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The good people of the place the police call the Badlands started small yesterday, fewer than 100 of them in front of St. Veronica's Church on the corner of Sixth and Tioga. They came to say the Stations of the Cross, a Good Friday tradition in the Catholic Church, during a two-hour march through their North Philadelphia neighborhood that was emotional and exhausting and at times, surreal. They sang joyful hymns in Spanish all along the way - up and down the drug blocks, past the video stores and corner groceries, the boarded-up rowhouses and the crowded living rooms, past the trash and devastation.
NEWS
March 9, 2009
RE JENICE Armstrong's recent column "Babes in Adultland": It's about time someone revived the discussion about the devastating social impact of children having children. Adolescents apparently don't have the maturity to know that if they can't choose abstinence, then they need to use contraception. And then they're ill-equipped, at best, to raise the children when they are born. When an adult grandparent can step in to assist, so much the better. But all too often, especially in pervasively impoverished communities, children who have children were raised by parents who were children themselves at childbirth (and whose own parents were in the same boat)
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of 9/11, most Americans felt a mixture of anger, sorrow and pride. Anger at the perpetrators. Sorrow from the unthinkable loss. Pride at the brave response. Oh, how different is Katrina. Last week, there was embarrassment at the sight of people dying of neglect in the streets of New Orleans. Shame at the violence, the extent of the looting, and the breakdown of societal norms. And disappointment, even outrage, at the slow and seemingly inadequate response of government from the top down.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | Charles Krauthammer
Whenever I hear Sept. 11 referred to as just a tragedy, I wince. The San Francisco earthquake was a tragedy. Hurricane Andrew was a tragedy. A tragedy is an act of God. Sept. 11 was an act of man. An act of war. Yes, Sept. 11 occasioned many tragedies - many terrible deaths, many terrible injuries, many terrible sorrows. These tragedies elicit a deep compassion and a shared grief. Which is why tomorrow will be a day of compassion and grief; of sorrow and remembrance; of celebration, too, of the courage and sacrifice of the heroes of that day. But more is required than homage and respect.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A love-smitten undertaker. A pretty, tough-as-nails corpse-robber. And a fluttery widow who discovers that her beloved husband left her about $1.3 million of outstanding debt. These are the only people we meet in Jeffrey Hatcher's wry, bittersweet Three Viewings, an evening of three monologues that opened Wednesday as the season-starting production of the Philadelphia Theatre Company. In the stories told by the trio, however, the population of an entire Midwestern town seems to come and go in the genteelly tasteful funeral-home foyer that designer James Noone has set on the stage of the Plays and Players Theatre.
NEWS
July 5, 1998
Unity in sorrow I have counted the fireflies on the sacred grounds of Concord and Lexington and felt the soft summer breezes blow on Cemetery Ridge. But never have I felt more American than when I walked the streets of Washington on my way to the Capitol Rotunda. It was November 1963. I was 9, and all the people around me had the same sad feeling. We were all Americans, and we had all lost our leader, our President and our dream. That night, as hundreds of us walked slowly through the cold streets of the capital, I became aware of our national sorrow.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a week of heartache, Mo'ne Davis and the Taney Dragons gave the world heart. You can tell: Davis, the hard-pitching, great-hitting member of the Dragons, will be on the cover of the Aug. 25 national issue of Sports Illustrated ( http://bit.ly/1AvkG4j ), for goodness' sake. Speaking for many, James B. Peterson, head of the department of Africana studies at Lehigh University, said, "We need this story right now, to uplift us at a time of great sorrow. "  And she was John Oliver's goo-goo-eyed opening monologue on Sunday night's Last Week Tonight on HBO, pitcher Davis and the Dragons were a rare feel-good story a grateful media world dandled like a twinkly bauble.
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