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Soul Food

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NEWS
April 18, 2014
BRYANT TERRY pretty much wrote the book on vegan soul-food cooking, by which I mean 2009's Vegan Soul Kitchen (Da Capo). Not that there were no well-done guides to vegan soul food out there, but Terry's had a huge impact in mainstream and vegan worlds - and on Takia McClendon. About the book that the New York Times said "makes Southern cooking healthy and cool," McClendon related in a phone interview that "it was my first cookbook as a vegan!" Terry, she said, is "someone who really taught me how to cook," inspiring her efforts to connect her community with soul food that tastes great but omits the health, environmental and ethical downsides of traditional fare.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Sophia Tareen, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Duct tape covers a large crack in the premier booth at Hard Time Josephine's Cooking, where waitresses call you "sweetie" and customers come for the steaming shrimp bisque and homemade peach cobbler that leaves a hint of cinnamon on the tongue. Not long ago, such an eyesore at one of Chicago's top soul-food restaurants would have been unthinkable. Despite the name, times were good: Chicago was a bustling center of black America, and people in the neighborhoods savored Southern-style cooking.
FOOD
February 20, 1991 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
For the purist, the thought of "healthy" soul food is the culinary equivalent of Aretha Franklin singing "Muskrat Love" or James Brown waltzing. The two just don't fit together. Let's face it. The soul food that for generations has been so good to us, is not exactly good for us. In these health-, heart- and cholesterol-conscious times, we've been bombarded with so much negative rap on the cardio-vascular consequences of partaking of favorites like pork ribs, fried chicken, ham hocks, neck bones, black-eyed peas, collard greens, corn bread and - sigh - sweet potato pie, that we could almost give them up. After all, folks yammering incessantly about high blood pressure and heart disease can really take all the pleasure out of a hearty mound of grits smothered in onion gravy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Don't pass on Soul Food, a tender and tasty family comedy set in Chicago. Equally important, don't make the mistake of seeing this heartwarming and cholesterol-elevating film on an empty stomach. Sure, George Tillman Jr.'s movie - a hugely accomplished urban fairy tale with an all-star cast including Vanessa L. Williams and Vivica A. Fox - nourishes the spirit. But the bountiful pans across supper tables groaning with greens, brimming with baked ham, steaming of cornbread and crackling with catfish aggravate hunger pangs, while the story feeds spiritual appetites.
FOOD
September 26, 1997 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Don't go to see "Soul Food" hungry. If you do, after seeing all the catfish, macaroni and cheese, black-eyed peas and peach cobbler lovingly photographed on the big screen, you'll probably have to leave abruptly and run to the nearest soul-food restaurant. And you'd miss a feel-good film that does something very rare - shows African-American characters with heart and compassion going about their everyday lives. "Soul Food" is an unabashedly sentimental family drama that will leave your stomach growling and require some tissues for the tears you'll shed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013
COLLARD-GREEN SMOOTHIE Cherron Perry of the Dandelion Bunch has a fresh take on collard greens: Cut 3 to 4 fresh collard-green leaves into strips. Put 1 cup cold water and stevia to taste in a blender. Add 2 handfuls of the greens and 1 to 2 frozen bananas, and blend until smooth. For a thicker consistency, add 1 or 2 cups ice cubes. BLACK-EYED PEA FRITTERS Head over to Geechee Girl Rice Cafe (6825 Germantown Ave.) for an awesome remake of black-eyed peas using a food processor, dried peas, onions, bell pepper, cornmeal and seasonings.
SPORTS
December 7, 1993 | By Gwen Knapp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Joe Juliano and S.A. Paolantonio and correspondent Mike Rabun contributed to this article
Randall Cunningham - author, co-host of his own television show, commercial pitchman - says he wants to get into the restaurant business next. The Eagles quarterback, who is out with a broken leg, said he is interested in starting a soul food restaurant, "like the Hard Rock Cafe, but with soul food," in either Philadelphia or Las Vegas. "It would be a good place for people to go down and get homecooked meals," Cunningham said in an interview played last night on WHWH-AM in Princeton.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soul Food, the longest-running predominantly African American drama on TV, will have its series finale tonight at 10. Now what? "Oh wow. What am I going to do now?" lamented Lydia Peace, 32, a University City filmmaker who has been an avid viewer of the award-winning series since its 2000 debut on Showtime. "Everything was wrapped around Soul Food on Wednesday nights. " Based on the 1997 movie of the same name starring Vivica A. Fox and Mekhi Phifer, Soul Food recounted the ups and downs of the three Joseph sisters in Chicago.
FOOD
February 14, 2001 | By DeNita S.B. Morris, FOR THE INQUIRER
During February, which is Black History Month, soul food gets a lot of attention. But some folks pass up traditional African American cooking, thinking it's automatically high in fat and calories: greasy fried chicken, collard greens laced with fatback, and dense, rich desserts. But there's a new generation of at-home cooks and professional chefs who whip up tasty, low-fat versions of such beloved foods. They take what Grandma made and improve on it, using different fats (replacing lard or shortening, for example, with olive oil or canola oil)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1998 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
The video business wakes up from its holiday hangover this week, with a great batch of new movies on video. Topping the list is a funny and sad tale of two college friends. Career Girls 1/2 (1997) (Fox) 95 minutes. Katrin Cartlidge, Lynda Steadman. Director Mike Leigh's wistful, minor-key rumination about friendship and the passing of years, as two college roommates from the mid-'80s (the terrific Steadman and Cartlidge) meet six years later for a weekend of reminiscing and reflection.
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NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
For the second time this year, a "heavy mouse infestation" and a staggering list of basic health violations prompted the Philadelphia health department to ask a Sichuan Chinese restaurant near the Belmont Reservoir to close temporarily. Chun Hing, in the 4100 block of Monument Road, was cited for 39 violations last week. Many of the infractions found May 12 echoed those found in a mid-February inspection: fresh rodent droppings throughout the kitchen, inadequate handwashing by employees, food thawing at room temperature, filthy dish racks and an ice machine held together with duct tape.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2015
IT WAS the day after Thanksgiving, and the leftovers cried out from the fridge. These weren't ordinary leftovers, either. No, these were the leftovers of the gods, prepared by my mother, my aunt and my wife, LaVeta. These were the foods of my childhood, and they included every unhealthy dish that made the movie "Soul Food" a staple for DVD bootleggers. But I wasn't planning to live my food fantasy through some grainy reproduction of the Vanessa Williams classic. No, I would eat my soul food in person, but I knew I wouldn't have much time.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Evelyn likes watching movies and eating soul food, but what she loves is singing and dancing. At 13, she already has her sights set on becoming a professional singer. Engage her in conversation about her favorite recording artists, and this shy 13-year-old quickly warms up. Her other top topics are fashion trends, particularly in hair and makeup. Recently, Evelyn had the chance to learn more about the beauty industry when she visited a salon, where the owner styled her hair, manicured her nails, and gave her some beauty tips.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
BRYANT TERRY pretty much wrote the book on vegan soul-food cooking, by which I mean 2009's Vegan Soul Kitchen (Da Capo). Not that there were no well-done guides to vegan soul food out there, but Terry's had a huge impact in mainstream and vegan worlds - and on Takia McClendon. About the book that the New York Times said "makes Southern cooking healthy and cool," McClendon related in a phone interview that "it was my first cookbook as a vegan!" Terry, she said, is "someone who really taught me how to cook," inspiring her efforts to connect her community with soul food that tastes great but omits the health, environmental and ethical downsides of traditional fare.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
B ARBARA DEVAN, 32, of Southwest Philadelphia, is chef, owner and CEO of Tasties, a soul-food restaurant on 52nd Street above Girard in West Philadelphia. This month she got city approval to run a food truck in University City. She plans to open a second Tasties restaurant next month on Germantown Avenue near Queen Lane in Germantown. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Tasties? A: I started Tasties in North Philadelphia in 2007. But after a year, I took a break to really find myself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013
COLLARD-GREEN SMOOTHIE Cherron Perry of the Dandelion Bunch has a fresh take on collard greens: Cut 3 to 4 fresh collard-green leaves into strips. Put 1 cup cold water and stevia to taste in a blender. Add 2 handfuls of the greens and 1 to 2 frozen bananas, and blend until smooth. For a thicker consistency, add 1 or 2 cups ice cubes. BLACK-EYED PEA FRITTERS Head over to Geechee Girl Rice Cafe (6825 Germantown Ave.) for an awesome remake of black-eyed peas using a food processor, dried peas, onions, bell pepper, cornmeal and seasonings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013
I HAD THE PLEASURE of interviewing activist/filmmaker Byron Hurt recently about his new documentary, "Soul Food Junkies. " Hurt will screen and discuss the film Thursday during a free event at Community College of Philadelphia. More than a documentary, "Soul Food" explores a son's deep love for his father, who refused to abandon the culinary tradition's high-fat and calorie-heavy dishes even when his health was threatened. Hurt's film takes a historical, cultural and culinary journey to the origins of soul-food traditions and their complex connection to black identity.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On the label of Daisy Smith's signature applesauce, several essential ingredients aren't listed. But you can almost taste them. "Determination, perseverance, hard work, and love," says Smith, whose sauce is featured at Momma's Home Made, her new Voorhees takeout. Set between a grocery store and a gold exchange in the modest Southgate Plaza on Haddonfield-Berlin Road, Momma's Home Made celebrated its grand opening Monday. The menu is soul food with a fresh twist and a light touch.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Second of two parts. Therice Denby's career track crystallized in the late 1980s while she was enrolled at Cheyney University - but not in the classroom. Her entrepreneurial calling came in her dorm room, where she toiled over a double-burner hot plate and an electric frying pan. "I was selling food out of my room," Denby explained. Her menu included pork chop and chicken sandwiches. On weekends, she met breakfast demands with eggs, grits and potatoes. It was all forbidden by university rules so "we would buy incense to try to cover up the smell," Denby confessed recently.
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