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Soul Music

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NEWS
June 5, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
Nineteen years ago, President Jimmy Carter declared June Black Music Month. One of the people who persuaded Carter to make his declaration was Philadelphia's own Kenny Gamble. To mark this annual celebration, Big Fat Friday is highlighting African-American music all month. This week, we kick it off with . . . In a cavernous New York loft high above the city lights, where candles are aglow and the jiggy set is in attendance, Universal Records' Ricky Jones steps on stage. He's the last singer in a three-night showcase of new Universal acts all performing under the banner of "organic soul.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Soul music is the bridge between Saturday night and Sunday morning. It takes songs that could lead as easily to sin as salvation and invests them with the uplifting spirit of gospel. The heyday of soul was brief, from the early-'60s hits of Solomon Burke to the late-'60s dominance of Aretha Franklin. But as long as Saturday night turns into Sunday morning, soul survives. Bobby King and Terry Evans know a few things about survival. They've been soul singers since the mid-'60s, when they left the South - and their respective gospel choirs - in hopes of achieving stardom in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Are today's younger listeners sorely lacking knowledge of soul music, especially the protest classics of the 1960s and '70s? So suggests Salamishah Tillet, University of Pennsylvania assistant professor of English and Africana Studies, in her scene-setting liner notes for the vital (and in all ways Philly-connected) John Legend and the Roots collaborative project "Wake Up!" (Columbia, A-) , focused on period anthems of the Civil Rights Movement and leading our new releases parade today.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Raphael Saadiq is in a good mood. And why shouldn't he be? Soul-hop's finest player and producer put out his first solo CD in four years, The Way I See It; he has songs in Beyonc?'s forthcoming film, Cadillac Records; and he is opening for John Legend. We dig Legend, but the order should be reversed. Saadiq's no dummy, however. He knows people have short-term memories, despite the mega-hits his band Tony! Toni! Tone! recorded between 1988 and 1996. Saadiq, 42, realizes he barely toured for his previous solo dynamos, 2002's Instant Vintage and 2004's Ray Ray, while he was producing records for Whitney, D'Angelo, Joss Stone and the Roots.
LIVING
January 30, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's like a Rolling Stones song from the '70s: You're strutting down the city sidewalk like a peacock, pimp hat cocked on your head. When you get to the corner of 15th and South, you hear James Brown's "Hi-Heel Sneakers" wafting through the air along with the smoky smell of barbecue ribs. You follow the beat and the aroma into Bob & Barbara's, where the music is blaring, the bar is packed, and the Pabst Blue Ribbon is flowing like the Mississippi - it's Juke, Jerk and Jive: Soul Barbecue night, which, on the second and fourth Wednesday of every month, re-creates the sounds, smells, and cut-rate prices of a Southern juke joint.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Who was that sweet lady passing out the Watchtower at 30th Street Station? And who would dare not take a copy from so earnest and charming a devotee of the faith? It was a devotion to the Jehovah's Witnesses that on many days led Ruby Gamble to hike from Stenton Avenue to City Hall with other witnesses, buttonholing passers-by and delivering their message of hope. Then she'd track down possible converts at the train station and other venues that might offer up interested people - or at least the curious.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
James Carr, the troubled 1960s soul-music master best known for his 1966 recording of "(At the) Dark End of the Street," has died of cancer in Memphis. He was 58. Mr. Carr, who died on Sunday, produced a limited body of work, releasing only a handful of singles for the tiny Goldwax label in the '60s before returning to recording in the 1990s. But the artistic accomplishments of the gospel-trained singer, who was born in Clarksdale, Miss., stand at the pinnacle of Memphis soul. He never achieved the success of contemporaries such as Otis Redding, Percy Sledge, or even label mate O. V. Wright, but his abilities as a song interpreter of spectacular emotional depth surpassed them all. Mr. Carr's rugged-voiced reading of Chips Moman and Dan Penn's "Dark End of the Street," later recorded by Aretha Franklin and the Flying Burrito Brothers, among others, is the definitive 2 1/2-minute soul-music exploration of forbidden love.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERB WARD, a Philadelphia R&B singer of the '60s and '70s, had the unusual distinction of being more popular in England at one point in his career than at home. His hit "Honest to Goodness" did make a splash when it was played on WHAT-AM in Philly in 1969, but in England it sold more than half a million copies. Another song, "Strange Change," was released on the Philadelphia Buddy label in 1965, then had a second life when it was re-released in 1970 in England and became a huge hit. Herb was also featured in a recent film about soul music for British television called "The Strange World of Northern Soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Do you like soul music? Sweet soul music? If so, you're definitely part of the music majority that laid a slew of pop and R&B awards on George Michael at the recent American Music Awards, and that's helped put albums like Michael's "Faith" and Stevie Winwood's "Roll With It," Joe Cocker's "Unchain My Heart" and Toots Hibbert's "Toots in Memphis" into the running for tonight's 31st annual Grammy Awards, which start at 8 on Channel 10. ...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
On Sunday, Betty Davis - the funk singer, not the actress - will get her due. "We thought it was time," Funky All-Star Revue vocalist Mharlyn Merritt said of the homage. "Very few people heard of her, and she influenced so many people - you can hear her in Macy Gray," Merritt said. Thus Soul Sundays, a weekly funk party at Tritone, will remember the Nasty Gal who gave us the "Anti Love Song. " The event will include DJ Steve Ferrell and the Funky All-Star Revue, which has pared its sessions with Ferrell down to once a month.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Mister Mann Frisby, For the Daily News
* IN PERFORMANCE AT THE WHITE HOUSE: WOMEN OF SOUL. 9 p.m. Monday, WHYY12. WASHINGTON, D.C. - On a blustery March morning, the heat was turned way up inside the White House as first lady Michelle Obama welcomed more than 120 students (including 20 from Olney Charter High) to celebrate "Women of Soul. " First came an interactive student workshop in the State Dining Room - "I'm Every Woman: The History of Women in Soul. " That evening, some major figures in that history strutted their soulful stuff at a concert that was filmed to air Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Celebrating the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the concert hall has never been easy. Where do you start? His activism? Culture? The poetry behind his ideals? In a rare appearance at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, Orchestra 2001 under James Freeman celebrated King on Saturday in any way it could: major new works by Richard Danielpour and Jay Fluellen plus the youthful Play On, Philly! Orchestra and a gospel choir, all of which will be repeated at 3 p.m. Sunday at Swarthmore College's Lang Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Piano-playing soul man John Legend has just released Love in the Future , his first recording since Wake Up! , the 2010 cover song collaboration with Philadelphia hip-hop band the Roots. These are busy days for the 34-year-old University of Pennsylvania alumnus, Class of 1999, who grew up as John Stephens in Springfield, Ohio. In addition to letting loose Love in the Future , which was artfully produced with the assistance of old friend Kanye West, the singer married swimsuit model Chrissy Teigen in September in Lake Como in Italy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | BY MICHAEL ELKIN, For the Daily News
WEST Philadelphia-born and -raised, Colman Domingo makes no pretense of passing as a prince of Bel-Air. No need to; at 43, he's more a poobah of film and stage. And he's got the credits to prove it, from Steven Spielberg's recent, Oscar-winning "Lincoln" to Spike Lee's "Passing Strange," a 2009 film based on a play that Domingo appeared in and won an off-Broadway Obie Award for. You'll also see him this fall in Lee Daniels' "The Butler," about White House butler Eugene Allen.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERB WARD, a Philadelphia R&B singer of the '60s and '70s, had the unusual distinction of being more popular in England at one point in his career than at home. His hit "Honest to Goodness" did make a splash when it was played on WHAT-AM in Philly in 1969, but in England it sold more than half a million copies. Another song, "Strange Change," was released on the Philadelphia Buddy label in 1965, then had a second life when it was re-released in 1970 in England and became a huge hit. Herb was also featured in a recent film about soul music for British television called "The Strange World of Northern Soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2012 | By Jonathan Takiff and Daily News Staff Writer
"YOU'D BE shocked at some of the big-name  R&B artists — from Patti LaBelle and Gladys Knight to  Jeffrey Osborne, James  Ingram, Smokey Robinson  and Howard Hewitt —  who no longer  have a recording deal," said Philly-based recording executive Randall Grass.  "The neighborhood  ‘mom and pop'  record stores which supported this music have pretty much gone away," he mourned. "And nowadays it's very hard for a seasoned artist to get a slot even on Urban Adult radio.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Who was that sweet lady passing out the Watchtower at 30th Street Station? And who would dare not take a copy from so earnest and charming a devotee of the faith? It was a devotion to the Jehovah's Witnesses that on many days led Ruby Gamble to hike from Stenton Avenue to City Hall with other witnesses, buttonholing passers-by and delivering their message of hope. Then she'd track down possible converts at the train station and other venues that might offer up interested people - or at least the curious.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
What's in a name, you might ask? Well, we are, with several of the more interesting (and curiously branded) musical artists hitting town this coming week. Roy Book Binder: We'd swear he used to spell it Bookbinder. Then again, Keith Richards used to go by Keith Richard. Let's just be happy this seasoned practioneer of Delta blues and ragtime is still serving up fingerpicked acoustic music and amusing stories. And he has two big dates to commemorate - what would have been Robert Johnson's 100th birthday last Sunday, and Roy's just-announced booking at the 50th Philadelphia Folk Festival in August.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
STEVE APPLEBAUM spent much of his life haunting the numerous venues around the region where his beloved urban-harmony music groups were performing. To say Steve had a passion for this kind of music would be an understatement. He was a fanatic. Steve accumulated an enormous cache of records, many featuring the once-popular, but many largely forgotten, groups that practiced R&B, doo-wop and soul music, known as "urban harmony. " It was almost as though the different jobs he held to keep body and soul together were incidental to his restless search for musical harmony.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Are today's younger listeners sorely lacking knowledge of soul music, especially the protest classics of the 1960s and '70s? So suggests Salamishah Tillet, University of Pennsylvania assistant professor of English and Africana Studies, in her scene-setting liner notes for the vital (and in all ways Philly-connected) John Legend and the Roots collaborative project "Wake Up!" (Columbia, A-) , focused on period anthems of the Civil Rights Movement and leading our new releases parade today.
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