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Sound And Fury

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NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By John Timpane and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're enlisting the rainbow to help an American masterpiece tell its tale the way its author intended, for the first time.   Using inks in 14 different colors, the Folio Society, based in London, has printed The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (2 vols., $345, www.foliosociety.com) the way the Nobel Prize winner said he wanted it. Neil Titman, commissioning editor for the Folio Society, calls The Sound and the Fury "the most successful limited edition we've ever had. " The society's website says "over 1,000" of the 1,480 copies ("there will be no more," says Titman)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Bombarded with sound as well as turbulent forest and wild-animal imagery, video artist Tania Mouraud's work at Slought Foundation is oriented less toward mastery of the world through action and more toward a mastery of seeing, of coming to know and feel. That's how I see the three-part video exhibit by this French artist now on view at three locations across town, and involving 11 video installations. The display's overall title is "I keep hearing the trains forever. " And this triple-header is presented by the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts (PIFA)
NEWS
August 25, 2010
I WAS SO angered reading Anthony Matthews' response to Jane Gilvary's "Cracker History 101" article. Mr. Matthews, it's people like you who keep the racist ball rolling. Ms. Gilvary was trying to make a point that not all white people are bad and that not all white people are responsible for slavery. Why can't you accept the fact that there were white people who tried to help black people? The point is, slavery happened. It was unfortunate, but what's done is done. Hitler killed millions of Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1986 | Reviewed by PAUL MARYNIAK, Daily News Staff Writer
"Whirlwind" By James Clavell. William Morrow & Co. $22.95 1,147 pages. Hard cover. There was a time when James Clavell wrote big, sprawling books that left readers crying "more. " Now he writes big, sprawling books that leave readers crying "enough. " From the memorable "Shogun," a rich and engrossing novel of Japan, Clavell's fall from grace started a few years ago with the mildly disappointing "Noble House," a novel of high finance in Hong Kong. He has plummeted to disaster with "Whirlwind," a fictional recounting of the 24 days that followed the fall of the Shah of Iran in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
When Phil Spector was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in January, he left an indelible impression. His acceptance speech was rambling, to be kind, and bodyguards seemed to guide him offstage. It looked like the behavior of a person who was out of it. Yet I later heard from several people who sat near Spector that he didn't have a drink - that this bizarre-looking behavior was a severe case of stage fright. After feeling like an outsider all his life, he was overwhelmed at this moment of homage.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1986 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Florence King is treasured by her fans as the Smart Girl's Smart Girl. As in smart and sassy. And wait until you meet her mama in Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady (Bantam, $3.95). Be warned, this is one of those fresh, funny memoirs that you are going to be reading aloud constantly to your loved one. He or she shouldn't mind, because King and her mom sound something like Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye: honest and funny. Simultaneously. She tells how she was raised - uh, make that reared - by a gentle, intellectual musician (Dad)
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | BY STEFAN D. SCHINDLER
When schools turn into war zones, children mirror a society at war with itself. Eruptions of violence in the halls of education are tragic, but no more absurd than the social fabric in which they are embedded. They are signs of that absurdity, a wake-up call, a sacrifice on the altar of a culture consumed by consumerism - the dark side of the serpent that eats its tail. When Plato said, "Society is man writ large," he illumined the principle underlying the Columbine High School massacre in April and the shootings since then.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Late-20th-century audiences can only envy their counterparts of 400 years ago. The music those ancients heard was played and sung as part of life. Intimacy was the norm; passivity was unknown in that musical setting. Everybody sang, danced, played and fairly resonated with the pulse of the music at hand. The Philadelphia Renaissance Wind Band audience had its memory refreshed to all that on Saturday when the core ensemble joined Parthenia, a New York-based consort of viols, to perform French dances and songs at the Church of St. Luke and the Epiphany.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Among the bleaker and more laughless of Woody Allen endeavors, You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger begins with a narrator paraphrasing Macbeth : "Shakespeare said life is full of sound and fury, and in the end signified nothing. " And in the end, You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger signifies pretty much nothing, too. Revisiting ideas and issues that Allen has kept in heavy rotation for decades - infidelity, death, art, the allure of youth - his 44th (44th!) film has been shot (pristinely, by Vilmos Zsigmond)
NEWS
November 18, 2006
What price for Israel? Re: "Send in the deal-makers," Nov. 12: To call James Baker a diplomatic wizard ignores glaring deficiencies in his policies vis-?-vis the Middle East. My concern about the Iraq Study Group's recommendations, of which Baker will be a principal architect, will be the way in which Israel is likely to be treated. Trudy Rubin's column ponders the question as to the price to be paid for the cooperation of Syria and Iran in stabilizing Iraq. U.S. support for Israel is a negotiating chip that always surfaces when the West needs cooperation from Islamic and Arab states.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By John Timpane and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're enlisting the rainbow to help an American masterpiece tell its tale the way its author intended, for the first time.   Using inks in 14 different colors, the Folio Society, based in London, has printed The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (2 vols., $345, www.foliosociety.com) the way the Nobel Prize winner said he wanted it. Neil Titman, commissioning editor for the Folio Society, calls The Sound and the Fury "the most successful limited edition we've ever had. " The society's website says "over 1,000" of the 1,480 copies ("there will be no more," says Titman)
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By John Timpane and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In my first year of college, I was, like many kids in the early 1970s, and today, working full time and taking a full load of courses. I often came home from my horrible busboy job at midnight or later and did homework. One night, I came in about 12:30 a.m. Dang: Big discussion in class tomorrow of William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury. It'd be my first Faulkner since the story "A Rose for Emily. " Still in my busboy's uniform, smeared with the dinners of others, I sat down with my Modern Library paperback, planning to skim.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
The Life and Music of James Brown By RJ Smith Gotham Books, 455 pp. $27.50 Reviewed by Dan DeLuca One night in 2006, the year that he would die on Christmas Day, James Brown played a show in Georgia. Not the Georgia where he was raised, but Tbilisi, Georgia, in the former Soviet Union, where the Godfather of Soul was bringing his primordially powerful music while still living up to one of his many nicknames - the Hardest-working Man in Show Business. This payday was odder than most - a 12-foot-high stage was built at one edge of an Olympic-size swimming pool, and while the band played, the audience sat on the other side of the pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Bombarded with sound as well as turbulent forest and wild-animal imagery, video artist Tania Mouraud's work at Slought Foundation is oriented less toward mastery of the world through action and more toward a mastery of seeing, of coming to know and feel. That's how I see the three-part video exhibit by this French artist now on view at three locations across town, and involving 11 video installations. The display's overall title is "I keep hearing the trains forever. " And this triple-header is presented by the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts (PIFA)
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
She didn't leave her full name or number, but today's column is brought to you in part by a reality check from Rita the Reader. "I was born Catholic and will die Catholic, but I want you and The Inquirer to keep the pressure on the hierarchy of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia," Rita railed via voice mail. "It's more than a disgrace. It's humiliating! It's criminal!" I don't know what Rita had to say about her church in 2002 or 2005, but it's a fair bet she gave the Archdiocese more credit than the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Among the bleaker and more laughless of Woody Allen endeavors, You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger begins with a narrator paraphrasing Macbeth : "Shakespeare said life is full of sound and fury, and in the end signified nothing. " And in the end, You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger signifies pretty much nothing, too. Revisiting ideas and issues that Allen has kept in heavy rotation for decades - infidelity, death, art, the allure of youth - his 44th (44th!) film has been shot (pristinely, by Vilmos Zsigmond)
NEWS
August 25, 2010
I WAS SO angered reading Anthony Matthews' response to Jane Gilvary's "Cracker History 101" article. Mr. Matthews, it's people like you who keep the racist ball rolling. Ms. Gilvary was trying to make a point that not all white people are bad and that not all white people are responsible for slavery. Why can't you accept the fact that there were white people who tried to help black people? The point is, slavery happened. It was unfortunate, but what's done is done. Hitler killed millions of Jews.
NEWS
March 9, 2007
Let us out! Has Steve Chapman ever been on a plane that has sat on the tarmac for four or more hours? ("The marketplace's penalties: Airlines know passengers will shun those who goof," commentary, Feb. 26.) He suggests that while "being stranded on the tarmac for four hours is bad," having a flight canceled may be worse. I suppose he doesn't need to walk around, go to the restroom, or eat or drink for hours on end. I assume his flights never have babies or toddlers on them.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
OPRAH WINFREY, what are you thinking? William Faulkner? Have you ever read Faulkner? Faulkner is dense, serious stuff, Oprah, rich with language. Do you really want your loyal fans to read Faulkner? Are you going to help them through the difficult passages? Answer their calls at 3 a.m. when they can't sleep because they didn't understand Page 43 (or pages 1 through 42). This time, you've gone too far. But your power is unmistakable. Within 24 hours of being chosen as your summer reading pick, a boxed set of three Faulkner novels "As I Lay Dying," "The Sound and the Fury" and "Light in August" was the No. 2 seller on Amazon.
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