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Sound Effects

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Into a thousand parts divide one man," William Shakespeare counsels his audience in the choral prologue to Henry V. ". . . Think, when we talk of horses, that you see them / Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth. " Thus did the playwright prepare the ground for his play's demands on the imagination - demands that have seldom been more pertinent than in the eight-actor production on the Arcadia Stage of the Arden Theatre Company. But the issue on this occasion is not, as it happens, whether one can have a Henry V without a full-blown battle of Agincourt.
SPORTS
August 12, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Some guys just can't take a joke. And when those guys are wearing blue, you might be in trouble, no matter who you are. Take the case of 15-year-old Paula Gibbons. Gibbons, the Long Beach Press-Telegram reports, is a volunteer in charge of the sound effects for the Long Beach Riptide of the independent Western Baseball League. You know the bit: breaking glass when a foul ball flies over the roof, a lot of "psst, psst, psst" when the opposing manager is out on the mound talking to his pitcher, a nasty "sit down in your seat" whenever an opposing batter strikes out. In the seventh inning of the Riptide's 3-2 victory over the Salinas Peppers on Saturday, a Riptide player was called out at third base on a close play.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
It's one of those weeks when the biggest new video release - one of the most popular movies in recent memory - may overshadow the other new arrivals. For some of them, it's just as well. WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (1988) (Touchstone) $22.99. 104 minutes. Bob Hoskins, Christopher Lloyd, Stubby Kaye, Joanna Cassidy. Delightfully harebrained comedy about a human private eye who solves a crime in Toontown, the Hollywood suburb in which cartoon stars live. Imagine a comic, cosmic convergence of cartoon low humor and live-action high jinks.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | By David Browne, New York Daily News
You know the situation. You're talking with a friend about the records he or she just bought and you're thinking, "I'd like to tape some of those songs. " But what if you could go into a record store, select the songs you like and leave with a tape that includes all of them? That's the idea behind the Personics Co. of Menlo Park, Calif., which debuted its system last week in 25 Los Angeles-area record stores. Customers can flip through a catalog of 2,500 songs on the system's optical-disc computer system, fill out a form, and presto - within five minutes, the record-store clerk hands you a custom-made compilation on a TDK cassette.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Jose Torres Tama has a good reason for beginning $CASINOAMERICA$ dressed in the red cape of Mephistopholes. He believes that the rise of the gaming industry amounts to America's making a deal with Satan, trading corruption of the populace for jobs and tax revenue. As the devil, he urges us to "give sleaze a chance. " Tama's views on officially sanctioned gaming are hardly original, but don't let that prevent you from seeing him. Tama is both a versatile writer who can be lyrically evocative as well as bitingly humorous, and an impressive performer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a nation, we continue to try to resolve and reconcile the Vietnam experience - why it happened, what it means and how to deal with it. On a more personal level, three new audio books offer explorations of three very different struggles. Ron Kovic, the paralyzed veteran who wrote Born on the Fourth of July (1976), now a movie, reads an abridged version of his book for Caedmon (three hours, $15.95). His story is largely one of anger and despair. Beyond Survival, a Navy pilot's account of his seven years as a prisoner of war in Hanoi, is intended to be more inspirational.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Not a dry eye in the house. Thornton Wilder's Our Town, with its combination of sentimentality and nostalgia, never fails to move people. And the Arden's lavish, leisurely production, capstone of its 20th season, proves that the old American classic is well worth reviving. Our Town is about Grover's Corners, a small New Hampshire town early in the 20th century. We get to know the Webb family and the Gibbs family; we watch Emily Webb (the lovely Rebecca Blumhagen) and George Gibbs (Peterson Townsend)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2011 | By Wesley Morris, BOSTON GLOBE
You can tell the makers of Bunraku were really excited about creating a cool, new movie world, because that's all the movie is: 118 minutes of effects, art direction, and genres. The story unites a gunslinger (Josh Hartnett) and a samurai (the androgynous Japanese pop star Gackt) for the purpose of killing a crime lord (Ron Perlman). So it's a western, a swordsman movie, and a gangster epic, yet it's none of those things. I imagine the writer and director, Guy Moshe, wanted to see what would happen if he pretended a bunch of different iconic styles and archetypal characters could be compressed into a single film.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
The day after 20 first graders and six adults were murdered at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, you'd have had a hard time convincing me anything was wonderful. The combination of the mass execution, the fiscal cliff, the Mayan Doomsday, and, heck, even the Eagles, has made this a pretty heavy holiday season. But refuge awaited inside a legendary local theater where a classic show was being offered as a timeless salve for society's woes. The stage lights are back on inside the Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, which, since 1939, has showcased the talents of such stars as Grace Kelly, Robert Redford, Walter Matthau, and Helen Hayes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Like a grand diva who can't get enough farewell tours, Les Misérables , the stage musical version, is again on a tour stop in Philadelphia against many odds. This time, it arrives amid formidable competition from the current film version that faithfully follows the musical about oppressed masses and idealistic uprisings in post-revolutionary France. By now, the touring stage shows have a fraction of the scenery seen in the Broadway original. The film is lavishly produced with major stars and has a smaller admission fee. Yet Wednesday night's opening at the packed Academy of Music clearly justified itself, thanks to a bright, unjaded cast at the top of its collective game and exercising a freedom of interpretation not always seen in touring companies that typically seek to reproduce the original-cast experience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Like a grand diva who can't get enough farewell tours, Les Misérables , the stage musical version, is again on a tour stop in Philadelphia against many odds. This time, it arrives amid formidable competition from the current film version that faithfully follows the musical about oppressed masses and idealistic uprisings in post-revolutionary France. By now, the touring stage shows have a fraction of the scenery seen in the Broadway original. The film is lavishly produced with major stars and has a smaller admission fee. Yet Wednesday night's opening at the packed Academy of Music clearly justified itself, thanks to a bright, unjaded cast at the top of its collective game and exercising a freedom of interpretation not always seen in touring companies that typically seek to reproduce the original-cast experience.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
The day after 20 first graders and six adults were murdered at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, you'd have had a hard time convincing me anything was wonderful. The combination of the mass execution, the fiscal cliff, the Mayan Doomsday, and, heck, even the Eagles, has made this a pretty heavy holiday season. But refuge awaited inside a legendary local theater where a classic show was being offered as a timeless salve for society's woes. The stage lights are back on inside the Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, which, since 1939, has showcased the talents of such stars as Grace Kelly, Robert Redford, Walter Matthau, and Helen Hayes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2011 | By Wesley Morris, BOSTON GLOBE
You can tell the makers of Bunraku were really excited about creating a cool, new movie world, because that's all the movie is: 118 minutes of effects, art direction, and genres. The story unites a gunslinger (Josh Hartnett) and a samurai (the androgynous Japanese pop star Gackt) for the purpose of killing a crime lord (Ron Perlman). So it's a western, a swordsman movie, and a gangster epic, yet it's none of those things. I imagine the writer and director, Guy Moshe, wanted to see what would happen if he pretended a bunch of different iconic styles and archetypal characters could be compressed into a single film.
SPORTS
November 22, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The NFL should expand its injury reports. It's time for the league to include media members in the updates. Most weeks, the studio hosts on ESPN, CBS, Fox, and the NFL Network would be listed as questionable (judgment) or doubtful (use of logic). With Michael Vick dominating the NFL and its story lines lately, all of them would have been upgraded to probable (hype and hyperbole). Vick's numbers weren't as cartoonish against the New York Giants on Sunday night as they were against the Washington Redskins on Monday night, partly because his receivers dropped at least two passes that should have been touchdowns.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
In ancient Athens 2,409 years ago, Socrates stood trial for, essentially, being a philospher, and for teaching the youth under his wing to ask questions. I doubt that he had a bunch of jurors as annoyingly responsive as the ones on the soundtrack that plays throughout Plato's Apology: The Trial of Socrates , a Quintessence Theatre production at Mount Airy's Sedgwick Theater. But he would have been lucky to have the stage persona of the production's Socrates, Sam Tsoutsouvas.
NEWS
September 1, 2008
Kid Simple: A Radio Play in the Flesh People in show business talk about Foley sound design - the art of creating such sound effects as footsteps, clanking chains and galloping horses with unseen props. Jack Foley, a key figure at Universal Studios back in the day, originated these techniques; now there are now whole courses in Foley. Jordan Harrison's play, Kid Simple: A Radio Play in the Flesh , is having a lively, clever production by Azuka Theatre, under Kevin Glaccum's direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Not a dry eye in the house. Thornton Wilder's Our Town, with its combination of sentimentality and nostalgia, never fails to move people. And the Arden's lavish, leisurely production, capstone of its 20th season, proves that the old American classic is well worth reviving. Our Town is about Grover's Corners, a small New Hampshire town early in the 20th century. We get to know the Webb family and the Gibbs family; we watch Emily Webb (the lovely Rebecca Blumhagen) and George Gibbs (Peterson Townsend)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
It's Christmas Eve. A television station, WKRIS, is going to tape a reading by a formerly famous actor of the traditional Christmas poem "A Visit From St. Nicholas. " Only minutes before the start, the behind-the-scenes staffers learn that this will be a live broadcast, and all of them are pressed into performance. The mistakes and the solutions are hilarious, as we watch both what happens on stage and what the home audience sees on the television monitor. Azuka Theatre's 'Twas the Night, at St. Stephen's Theatre, is an enjoyable hour that could be funnier if it were shorter, although the performance I saw was a preview and it might tighten up. At the start, we're introduced to the Russian cinematographer (John Zak)
NEWS
January 10, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
World War I. France, 1916. Two young men, fresh from Yale, volunteer as ambulance drivers. They meet two nurses, one English and one French. If you're interested in plot, all the predictable stuff follows: love, sex, letters, death, grief. (Think A Farewell to Arms. Think Casablanca.) But Pig Iron Theatre Company's Gentlemen Volunteers is thrillingly unpredictable, because along with the surprisingly moving melodrama, we get dazzling theatrical effects. These effects are created by the imagination and precision Pig Iron is famous for: no makeup, no props, no scenery - no net. The play is performed in English, in French and in mime, and the audience is herded from station to station in the vast, nearly empty Drexel Armory.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO - For the Daily News
I N THE 1930s and '40s, composers from Berlin, Vienna and Budapest came to Hollywood to invent symphonic film music. In the 1970s, when electronics began to take over, John Williams from Long Island brought symphonic music back. Five Oscars, 42 nominations and nine Grammys later, the prolific Williams is the most visible film composer in history. He'll make his first appearance at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts tomorrow night conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra. It's been estimated that 50 times more people know the theme to "Star Wars" than know Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.
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