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Sound Track

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Movie director John Hughes has been so successful at selecting hip rock music to accompany his hit films that MCA Records has given him his own record label. Thus, the release of Some Kind of Wonderful (Hughes Music/MCA ), the sound-track album to the new Hughes movie of the same name. Hughes has a fondness for arty English rock bands, and two of these, Flesh for Lulu and the March Violets, dominate the album with their yawning vocals and plodding melodies. There are also lively selections by Pete Shelley, Stephen Duffy and, best of all, a lovely version of the Elvis Presley hit "Can't Help Falling in Love" by the Irish band called Lick the Tins.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
La Bamba (Warner Bros. ) is the sound-track album to the movie of the same name about early rocker Ritchie Valens. The record features eight Valens hits performed by Los Lobos, and all sound terrific - lively, loose, yet true to the spirit of the originals. There's also a stand-out version of Buddy Holly's "Crying, Waiting, Hoping " by Marshall Crenshaw, as well as lesser performances by Brian Setzer and Howard Huntsbury. All in all, one of the few sound-track albums worth hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Movie sound-track albums are usually useless collections of hit singles in search of a context, but the one for the upcoming Robin Williams comedy Club Paradise (Columbia ) holds your interest with oddities. The most noticeable one is a duet between the film's co-star, Jamaican reggae singer Jimmy Cliff, and English rocker Elvis Costello. Their "Seven- Day Weekend" is clumsy and affable - their voices never mesh, and the melody isn't memorable, but it's a charming effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The slow, steady growth of the genre of opera recordings made from the sound tracks of films has picked up recently. Verdi's Macbeth and La Traviata and Bizet's Carmen are among the big-budget films that have made international rounds and left their recorded sound behind on LP and CD. Puccini's La Boheme is the latest, the sound track coming from a film directed by Luigi Comencini, and recorded in Paris (Erato 75450). In this recording, made in May 1987, James Conlon conducts the Orchestre National de France and the chorus of Radio France.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sylvia Rhone, the president of Elektra Records, is rattling off the summer movies with accompanying sound-track albums - Godzilla, The X-Files, Armageddon, Doctor Dolittle, the list goes on. And almost all of them have the same m.o., says Rhone: "a smorgasbord of names . . . big marketing tie-ins . . . one tent-pole song people will know, and the rest just rips off the consumer. " In the next 3 1/2 months, more than 20 films will be accessorized with a glitzy compilation album featuring music used in and, increasingly, "inspired by" the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
You don't need to see the movie to feel the tension of Patty Hearst. Buy the sound track (Nonesuch ). Slinky little synthesizer lines creep along, playing a game of cat and mouse against a throng of guitars that refuse to relinquish their steady, ear- splitting sustained notes. Percussion simmers and rattles but never boils. Chopped bits of vocal samples dart into the foreground. "Mom . . . dad?" Guitarist Scott Johnson has done what seems impossible for so many contemporary movie sound tracks: Create a work that stands on its own. Sure, the melodies don't come along and bonk you over the head.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1998 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The movie sound-track business is in hyperdrive. In 1997, music fans bought more than 45 million sound tracks, a number that will be even higher this year, thanks to the obscenely successful Titanic sound track. The classical-plus-Celine-Dion package has held the top spot on the Billboard 200 album chart for an unfathomable 14 consecutive weeks. But while multi-artist "music from and inspired by" projects work fine as keepsakes and the place to find that hit you can't get anywhere else, it's the rare sound track that holds together artistically from start to finish.
LIVING
June 27, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The summer movie season is in full swing, and that means that both the major studios and tiny independents are peddling sound tracks by an assortment of well-known and budding hit-makers. These days, it doesn't matter if a song was actually heard in the film. Most of the more sophisticated sound tracks boast new songs "inspired by" the film - or more accurately, inspired by the film studio's youth-savvy marketing department. Of course, some movies manage to incorporate lots of music - for example, I Shot Andy Warhol, Stealing Beauty and, especially, the John Travolta vehicle Phenomenon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1998 | By Tom Moon and Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Anyone requiring further proof of the record industry's shortsighted obsession with blockbuster packages over works by individual artists need look no further than The Prince of Egypt. The animated DreamWorks feature, which opens Dec. 18, has produced not one, not two, but three distinct sound-track albums, each aimed at a slightly different demographic. There's the official sound track, which contains the Whitney Houston/Mariah Carey duet "The Prince of Egypt (When You Believe)," several mood-setting moments by Israel's Ofra Haza and little else of interest to the pop audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1988 | By Nancy Shear, Special to The Inquirer
The Russian classic film Alexander Nevsky is the product of a unique collaboration between two of this century's greatest creative artists: director Sergei Eisenstein and composer Sergei Prokofiev. It is perhaps the only example of a truly great work of music being part of a great film. The performance Friday at the Mann Music Center will be a new experience even for anyone already familiar with the film: There, replacing the weak, 50- year-old recorded sound track, will be the full forces of the Philadelphia Orchestra, seated beneath a huge projection screen.
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NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last weekend, the Springfield Township library in Delaware County hosted a screening of the sing-along edition of Frozen , the Disney film in which an ice queen, Elsa, dooms her subjects to eternal frostbite until her younger sister, Anna, steps in to save the day. The children in attendance (including 12 Elsas, two Annas, and a Superman) were spellbound. Amanda Winnett, however, was less than rapt. It was, she said, about the 200th time she had watched the film with her daughter Catherine, a 4-year-old wearing filmy Frozen pajamas and clutching a magic wand that looked deceivingly like a craft-foam snowflake stapled to a Popsicle stick.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
From the sound of things, Greg Dulli still hasn't given himself a break. Since the '90s, with such psyche-stirring albums as Gentlemen , the Afghan Whigs allowed Dulli to reach into the darkest recesses of the male anima. He twisted literate lyrics of overwrought emotionalism, vengeful disgust (usually involving busted romances) and seedy self-loathing into a soulful, post-punk opera of his unmerry devising. That he shut down the Whigs only to reunite (some of) them for their first album in 16 years (2014's Do to the Beast )
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
It's no secret the Disco Biscuits love to play. Formed at the University of Pennsylvania in 1995, named for the '70s feel-good drug Quaalude, the Biscuits merged the jam-band form familiar from the Grateful Dead and the all-day-all-night sensibilities of a techno-tronic rave with electronic beats and boings to match. Along with launching Camp Bisco's music festival for improvisational bands and DJs in Upstate New York, the Biscuits play mini-fests, called City Bisco, where they take over your town and several venues for a stretch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Despite Donald Glover's pedigree as a writer for 30 Rock and his starring role on Community , there's nothing funny about his rap alter ego, Childish Gambino, and albums like Camp . Caustically witty and weirdly metaphorical with an oddly jagged sound track, yes, but hardly the stuff of stand-up or sketch comedy. Then again, during Gambino's Electric Factory show Friday, you couldn't help sensing this was performance art, with its drawing-room set and e-speak projections in accordance with the backstory of his album Because the Internet of a tweet-happy socialite bugging out in his mansion.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Don Lessem, For The Inquirer
If you ignore the blasting sound track, studded with a really odd mix of music, BBC Earth's 3-D spectacular Walking With Dinosaurs , the film version of the 1999 BBC TV show, is a pleasing, sometimes awe-inspiring rendition of life among some of the less-celebrated dinosaurs of northwestern North America. The music's not great, the jokes are corny, and sometimes the voice-overs aren't much better, especially the unaccountable Hispanic accent John Leguizamo gives to the dino-age bird Alexornis.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Vicky Hallett, Washington Post
There's a moment in the musical Les Misérables when Jean Valjean, who had spent the last 19 years imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread, narrowly escapes being sent back after snatching silver from a kindly bishop. It's a turning point for the protagonist, who uses the reprieve to launch into a song - "What Have I Done?" - and a new way of life. It's kind of like what happened to Trinity Wheeler a few years back. The production manager for the touring company of Les Misérables (currently at Philadelphia's Academy of Music)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011 | By Dan Gross
"GLEE" ACTOR Jonathan Groff , who plays Jesse St. James on the Fox hit, will sing the "Star-Spangled Banner" at 1:30 Sunday afternoon before a day of harness racing at Harrah's Chester. The Lancaster-raised actor's dad, Jim Groff , is a veteran harness driver and trainer. His son was nominated for a Tony award for his performance in Broadway's "Spring Awakening. " Gay journos Curry favor "Today Show" co-host Ann Curry and CNN's Don Lemon , formerly of NBC10, will be keynote speakers at the 21st annual National Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association convention next weekend at the Loews Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To watch the movie producer Gregoire Canvel (played by Louis-Do de Lencquesaing) walking through the streets of Paris in the heartbreaking Father of My Children is to witness a man with the weight of the world pressing down on him. In the early sequences of Mia Hansen-Love's beautifully observed family portrait, Canvel, wielding a mobile phone (or two), smoking cigarettes, fielding panicky missives from a Swedish film set, is all resilient charm. Sure, he owes millions to labs, to studios, to the banks.
NEWS
October 21, 2009 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I'm sitting with the savages in Section 205. The woman behind me keeps knocking me in the head as she tries to plant her foot on my shoulder and clamber onto the back of my seat for a better view. There goes her beer, down my wife's suede coat. "Yoooo-woooo!" the two Springsteen fans to my left shriek, and it would drown out the gorgeous trumpet, bass, and piano rendition of "Meeting Across the River. " Except that back here, 14 rows off the Spectrum floor, I'm barely hearing it anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'Maestro, what's going on?" someone asks Walter Garber - looking a lot like Denzel Washington as he casts a puzzled gaze at the giant computerized board in New York's Rail Center headquarters, its lights indicating a Lexington Avenue train stopped on the tracks. What's going on? Try a remake of The Taking of Pelham 123, the 1974 hostage drama in which a band of bad guys with funny mustaches take control of a subway car, terrorizing its passengers and giving the city a mere 60 minutes to deliver a ransom.
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